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The Magician's Land (Magicians Trilogy) Hardcover – 5 Aug 2014

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 401 pages
  • Publisher: Viking Books (5 Aug. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670015679
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670015672
  • Product Dimensions: 16.8 x 3.3 x 24.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 391,267 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"The final part of the outstanding Magicians trilogy ... Lev Grossman manipulates fantasy genres with skill ... The Magician's Land glitters with wit, but the warp and weft of the story is shot through with emotional rawness and a sense of peril." (Daily Mail)

"Richly imagined and continually surprisingThe strongest book in Grossman’s series. It not only offers a satisfying conclusion to Quentin Coldwater’s quests, earthly and otherwise, but also considers complex questions about identity and selfhood as profound as they are entertaining … This is a gifted writer, and his gifts are at their apex in The Magician’s Land." (Edan Lepucki New York Times Book Review)

"[A] wonderful trilogy ... If the Narnia books were like catnip for a certain kind of kid, these books are like crack for a certain kind of adult ... Brakebills graduates can have a hard time adjusting to life outside ... Readers of Mr. Grossman’s mesmerizing trilogy might experience the same kind of withdrawal upon finishing The Magician’s Land. Short of wishing that a fourth book could suddenly appear by magic, there’s not much we can do about it." (Sarah Lyall New York Times)

"A wholly satisfying and stirring conclusion to this weird and wonderful tale ... Relentlessly subversive and inventive ... [Grossman] reminds us that good writing can beguile the senses, imagination and intellect. The door at the back of the book is still there, and we can go back to those magical lands, older and wiser, eager for the re-enchantment." (Washington Post)

"The Magician’s Land ... does all the things you want in a third book: winding up everyone's stories, tying up the loose ends - and giving you a bit more than you bargained for ... Starting very early in Magician's Land, Grossman kicks off a series of escalating magical battles, each more fantastic, taut, and brutal than the last ... At the same time, Grossman never loses sight of the idea of magic as unknowable and unsystematized, a thread of Borgesian Big Weird that culminates in a beautiful tribute to Borges himself. It's this welding together of adventure-fiction plotstuff and introspective, moody characterization that makes this book, and the trilogy it concludes, so worthy of your reading time, and your re-reading time." (Cory Doctorow, Boing Boing)

"Grossman makes it clear in the deepening complexity and widening scope of each volume that he understands the pleasures and perils of stories and believing in them ... The Magician's Land triumphantly answers the essential questions at the heart of the series, about whether magic belongs to childhood alone, whether reality trumps fantasy, even whether we have the power to shape our own lives in an indifferent universe." (Gwenda Bond Los Angeles Times)

"The strength of the trilogy lies ... in the characters, whose inner lives and frailties Grossman renders with care and empathy ... Quentin[’s] ... magical journey is deeply human." (New Yorker)

"The world of Grossman's ‘Magicians’ series is arrestingly original, joyful and messy. It's so vividly rendered that it's almost disappointing to remember that it doesn't, after all, exist. The overall effect is — well, there's really only one word for it: It's magical." (Chicago Tribune)

"When read straight through, the Magicians trilogy reveals its lovely shape. The world of the books wraps around itself, exposing most everything necessary by its conclusion, but occluding operations that we'll never need to see. There's still a series of mysteries and untold tales left unknown deep inside the books." (Choire Sicha Slate Book Review)

"The last (and IOHO, best) book in the hit Magicians trilogy. Savor every word." (Cosmopolitan) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

The riveting conclusion to Lev Grossman's bestselling Magicians trilogy. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By booksy on 5 Jan. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I feel bereft leaving the world of Fillory and Brakebills. Grossman has, consistently, brought all the magic of the Narnia and Harry Potter books to an adult audience. Yet he's put his own spin on things. The Magicians trilogy nods to those books - sometimes blatantly - the author doesn't try to ignore the world of Harry Potter, nor its influence (and in fact homage is occasionally directly paid to Potter). Yet the Magicians trilogy is a masterpiece in its own right. At one point during this novel, the emotions Quentin felt as a nine year old boy, first reading about Fillory, are described as those of 'awe, joy, hope and longing'. I distinctly remember those feelings while reading Narnia and The Magic Faraway Tree series as a child. It's very rare, however, to experience those emotions as an adult reading fantasy. So it speaks volumes to Grossman's skill as a writer that has managed to evoke these feelings in me as an adult reader. Each of these novels took me back to my childhood and also seamlessly created a whole new world of wonder, populated with interesting, flawed, complex characters.

I think it's safe to say that if you've enjoyed the first two books, then this final novel will tick the same boxes for you. All the elements of the previous novels are there, with a well-balanced split between earth-based adventures and Fillory-based adventures. There's even a return to Brakebills South! And the denouement doesn't disappoint (always a worry when you've been holding out for so long to find out how it all concludes). There were no loose ends or WTF moments. It was a simply delightful journey from start to finish.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sandradan1 on 16 Jan. 2015
Format: Paperback
Thrown out of Fillory and back in the non-magical world, Quentin Coldwater retreats to his former magical university in Brooklyn. Brakebills. He becomes a professor where he teaches his discipline, described as ‘mending small things’. Remember this, it will be important later.
This is the final book of the trilogy and like book two, ‘The Magician King’, this final instalment is action-packed. The story moves between present and past, Fillory and earth, above ground, in the air and underground. Seeking adventure, and money, Quentin meets a new group of underground magicians and accepts a task for payment of $2m. On the team is Plum, who admits she once attended Brakebills too.
In parallel we get the stories of Quentin, Eliot [still in Fillory] and Plum. In order to understand the threat in the present, we have to go back in time to fill in the real story of what happened to the Chatwin children [whose true adventures inspired the novels of Fillory]. And it becomes plain that the Fillory known by Quentin from his childhood love of those novels, is incorrect. The novels were fictional and Fillory is not what it seems.
Depending on them all, is the very existence of Fillory.
A cracking finale.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rowena Hoseason HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 14 Jan. 2015
Format: Paperback
There are some book series where you can join the narrative part-way through, but Lev Grossman’s Magician trilogy isn’t one of them. If you’ve not already journeyed to Fillory, a land of mythical creatures which bears an uncanny resemblance to Narnia, then don’t start here. Go back to the first book, The Magicians, and begin in the proper place otherwise much of this final part will be utterly mystifying.

Instead of being delightfully reunited with old friends and foes, you’ll be baffled by the complex tangle of characters and realities with their ironic echoes of boy wizards and Hogwarts, secret gardens and witches in the wardrobe. In this three-book series the author has skilfully blended aspects from each and added more than a dash of his own cynical wit. The result is post-Potter, post-innocence; a sardonic and occasionally bitter journey through the looking glass. It has its moments of sheer indulgent childish delight, but it’s also as grim as any old-fashioned fairy tale…
TML is flat-out fabulous by the standards of most modern fantasy. Grossman brings originality and devious plotting to genre tropes and scatters sacred cows (or rams…) willy-nilly. However, in trying to satisfactorily wrap up all of Fillory’s plotlines he ends up with a book that feels more like a roll call at times. It sparkles less than the first episode, has none of the emotional wrench of the magnificently brutal middle book. It feels oddly lacklustre for a sweeping grand resolution which has just about every mythical beast and pivotal life-point hurled into its cataclysmic mix. With the previous books you always got the impression that some parts of the storytelling were delivered tongue-in-cheek, in-jokes verging on satire. This one seems to take itself extremely seriously.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rowena Hoseason HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 14 Jan. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
There are some book series where you can join the narrative part-way through, but Lev Grossman's Magician trilogy isn't one of them. If you've not already journeyed to Fillory, a land of mythical creatures which bears an uncanny resemblance to Narnia, then don't start here. Go back to the first book, The Magicians, and begin in the proper place otherwise much of this final part will be utterly mystifying.

Instead of being delightfully reunited with old friends and foes, you'll be baffled by the complex tangle of characters and realities with their ironic echoes of boy wizards and Hogwarts, secret gardens and witches in the wardrobe. In this three-book series the author has skilfully blended aspects from each and added more than a dash of his own cynical wit. The result is post-Potter, post-innocence; a sardonic and occasionally bitter journey through the looking glass. It has its moments of sheer indulgent childish delight, but it's also as grim as any old-fashioned fairy tale...
TML is flat-out fabulous by the standards of most modern fantasy. Grossman brings originality and devious plotting to genre tropes and scatters sacred cows (or rams...) willy-nilly. However, in trying to satisfactorily wrap up all of Fillory's plotlines he ends up with a book that feels more like a roll call at times. It sparkles less than the first episode, has none of the emotional wrench of the magnificently brutal middle book. It feels oddly lacklustre for a sweeping grand resolution which has just about every mythical beast and pivotal life-point hurled into its cataclysmic mix. With the previous books you always got the impression that some parts of the storytelling were delivered tongue-in-cheek, in-jokes verging on satire. This one seems to take itself extremely seriously.
Read more ›
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