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The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True [Audiobook] [Audio CD]

Richard Dawkins , Lalla Ward
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (206 customer reviews)

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Kindle Edition 3.99  
Hardcover 17.00  
Paperback 6.29  
Audio, CD, Audiobook, Unabridged 18.98  
Audio, CD, Audiobook, 4 Oct 2011 --  
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Book Description

4 Oct 2011

What are things made of?

What is the sun?

Is there really life on other planets?

Why do bad things happen?

Throughout history, people have invented fascinating stories to explain the world we live in. Have you heard the tale of how the sun hatched out of an emu's egg? Or what about the great catfish that carries the world on its back? Has anyone ever told you that earthquakes are caused by a sneezing giant? These fantastical myths are fun - but what are the real answers to such questions?

Professor Richard Dawkins has teamed up with renowned illustrator Dave McKean to take you on an amazing journey from atoms to animals, pollination to paranoia, the big bang to the bigger picture. See the wonder of science come alive in this beautifully illustrated guide to the greatest questions on earth - and some of the answers to them.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Audio CD: 6 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Unabridged edition (4 Oct 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1442341769
  • ISBN-13: 978-1442341760
  • Product Dimensions: 14.5 x 13.2 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (206 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,629,135 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Richard Dawkins first catapulted to fame with his iconic work The Selfish Gene, which he followed with a string of bestselling books: The Extended Phenotype, The Blind Watchmaker, River Out of Eden, Climbing Mount Improbable, Unweaving the Rainbow, The Ancestor's Tale, The God Delusion, The Greatest Show on Earth, The Magic of Reality, and a collection of his shorter writings, A Devil's Chaplain.

Dawkins is a Fellow of both the Royal Society and the Royal Society of Literature. He is the recipient of numerous honours and awards, including the Royal Society of Literature Award (1987), the Michael Faraday Award of the Royal Society (1990), the International Cosmos Prize for Achievement in Human Science (1997), the Kistler Prize (2001), the Shakespeare Prize (2005), the Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science (2006), the Galaxy British Book Awards Author of the Year Award (2007), the Deschner Prize (2007) and the Nierenberg Prize for Science in the Public Interest (2009). He retired from his position as the Charles Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University in 2008 and remains a fellow of New College.

In 2012, scientists studying fish in Sri Lanka created Dawkinsia as a new genus name, in recognition of his contribution to the public understanding of evolutionary science. In the same year, Richard Dawkins appeared in the BBC Four television series Beautiful Minds, revealing how he came to write The Selfish Gene and speaking about some of the events covered in his latest book, An Appetite for Wonder. In 2013, Dawkins was voted the world's top thinker in Prospect magazine's poll of 10,000 readers from over 100 countries.

Product Description

Review

"It's the clearest and most beautifully written introduction to science I've ever read . . . Explanations I thought I knew were clarified; things I never understood were made clear for the first time." (Philip Pullman)

"I wanted to write this book but I wasn't clever enough. Now I've read it, I am." (Ricky Gervais)

"Prodigiously illustrated and beautifully designed ... I cannot think of a better, or simpler, introduction to science." (Guardian)

"From the first sentence it reads with the force and fluency of a classic ... a luminous, authoritative prose that transcends age differences." (The Times)

"With fabulous illustrations by Dave McKean, Richard Dawkins' The Magic of Reality is an outstanding science book. Written in a simple. conversational style that will appeal to adults as well as teenagers, it really does explain complex subjects clearly. Every home should have a copy of this beautifully produced book." (Marilyn Brocklehurst The Bookseller) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

See the wonder of science come alive in this fascinating guide to life's greatest questions. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
79 of 85 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book 3 Oct 2011
By samfalc
Format:Hardcover
A thoroughly excellent and charming read. I would highly recommend this book to anybody regardless of age or experience. As a young man with a fairly good knowledge of popular science I still found myself learning a lot of knew things, and even if I hadn't, the sheer clarity of thought and beauty of the writing would make it more than worthwhile. Not to mention some outstanding illustrations from Dave Mckean.

It should be on the shelves in every household for so many reasons, but I can imagine for parents looking to educate their children in critical thinking then this would be perfect. I certainly would have liked a book like this to have been available in my younger years! I think particularly the structure of the book provides an excellent framework for the content, with each chapter asking one of the profound questions which we have all asked at some point. A must buy.
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166 of 180 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reality will out 18 Sep 2011
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I am glad that Dawkins has decided to write a popular science book to include a younger audience. The clarity and humour with which he deftly expounds factual reality (is there any other kind), deserves to be accessible to all.

I read the 265 pages of this book within 24 hours of having received it, not through lack of content, rather because the content was so logical, amusing and beautifully illustrated. Award winning Dave McKean should take some credit here. The Dali-esque depictions of imaginary creatures from other planets were some of my favourites. Pictures aside, if I find a book dull, I fall to sleep very quickly. Despite being familiar with much of the content, I was riveted.

The format of each chapter deserves a mention.
1)Start with a popular misconception about how something was once thought to be explained.
2)Demonstrate the poverty of the myth's ability to generate new and real information.
3)Observe the peculiar, mythological attempt at logic, laugh hard
4)Proceed with the actual, testable and scientific explanation.

Where a question lies outside the boundaries of current understanding or Dawkins personal expertise, he is quick to point this out. Given the title of the book, I was pleased to see that no attempts were made to fudge answers (a standard I would expect), though at times I do suspect a little false modesty.

Being critical, I think a problem that a book like this must face is where to start, because the assumption of prior scientific knowledge would risk losing the target audience. Therefore, popular science aficionardos may find this slow to start. However, the apparently randomly ordered chapter subjects build well upon each other to reveal some of the most interesting content later on.
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170 of 186 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Handsomely produced curate's egg 8 Oct 2011
By F. Odds
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I'm a huge fan of Richard Dawkins. Despite the claims of his detractors, he is consistently calm and polite when arguing with people who disagree with his views, and his books -- oh, if only his detractors would read and understand them! -- are all lucid, thought-provoking and educational. For Dawkins to produce a book aimed at instilling in young readers a sense of wonder in the magic of the real world was a bold but commendable step. His approach, outlining the myths used by superstitious people to explain what they don't understand then showing how the real explanations are both more satisfying and convincing, is original and effective.

The problem with the book is that it only sometimes achieves what its cover says it intends: to explain HOW we know what's really true. Dawkins has run up against the obstacle that confronts every science teacher at every level. Science has given us so huge and so deep an understanding of our planet and the universe that it is by now impossible to detail the evidence for everything we know to be true. The consequence is science teaching that is often decried as a "wall of facts". There is so much to be learned it allows little room for presentation of the people who made the discoveries and the evidence on which the discoveries were based.

Newton's laws of gravity, Darwin's theory of evolution and Einstein's theories of relativity retain the names of the people who assembled the evidence, but for most familiar scientific "facts" we no longer have any idea whose work and what evidence lay behind their discovery. It is therefore disappointing that a book that sets out to explain how we know what is real so often follows the wall of facts approach.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
By Jason Mills VINE VOICE
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Dawkins here seeks to enthuse young minds about science: not only with its discoveries but as an approach to the world that is far more thrilling and fascinating - not to say productive - than the idle stories and easy answers of myth and religion. Indeed, it is inherently an encouragement to learn and to challenge one's intellect, rather than to remain ignorant.

Each chapter addresses a question about the world: What are things made of? What is a rainbow? Dawkins commences in each case by recounting myths from around the world. He acknowledges that these stories are enjoyable and interesting, but he does not need to work hard to show their inadequacies as explanations. (Dawkins bundles in the myths of current religions with those of ancient or 'minor' ones, which is perfectly legitimate, if a tad mischievous; but he does not hammer the reader over the head with that angle: the word "atheist", for instance, does not appear.)

Then follows the scientific view of the phenomenon in question, carefully and clearly articulated. Although generally well pitched for an audience entering their teenage years, his prose is sometimes a little demanding:

"The Chumash people believed that they were created on their island (it obviously wasn't called Santa Cruz then, because that is a Spanish name) from the seeds of a magic plant by the Earth goddess Hutash, who was married to the Sky Snake (what we know as the Milky Way, which you can see on a really dark night in the country, but not if you live in a town where there is too much light pollution)."

Somebody should have told him not to squeeze two or three sentences into one! Such lapses are rare, however, and the text is a thoroughly engaging read.

Of course, it's only half the story.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars
nothing new
Published 4 days ago by Mr Anthony H Simpson
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic book
Brilliant ! This book explores science in a whole new light and is very straightforward and easy to understand. Challenges your previous thinking.
Published 19 days ago by Trisha
5.0 out of 5 stars Great!
Really love the subject, very interesting style of writing and analysing. Using as source material and think it will provoke many questions.
Published 22 days ago by Jennifer
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read.
Richard Dawkins explains things very clearly so that you are in no doubt as to what he is telling you. He dispells any untruths very admirably.
Published 1 month ago by handyman
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it.
Another brilliant book by a brilliant author. Top notch, 10/10, highly recommend. Everybody should read all of Richard Dawkins books. Read it. Now. Seriously.
Published 1 month ago by teatime
5.0 out of 5 stars christmas present for daughter
great book that's cuts through the force fed B.S of RE in schools, my daughter likes it and best of all it horrified the god bother's that I work with that I had given it to her.
Published 1 month ago by pay your tax !!!!!
1.0 out of 5 stars written for people who use Yahoo Answers
More the 'God Delusion' than the 'Selfish Gene'. Dawkins seems to spend pages at a time explaining why I shouldn't believe in Astrology or Noahs Ark without ever really delving... Read more
Published 1 month ago by John Cassidy
4.0 out of 5 stars Reality explained - Complexity made strait forward
WIthout talking down to people, Dawkins made complex explainations strait forward, and had som very nice examples that made it worth your while.
Published 2 months ago by Hanne Led
5.0 out of 5 stars Much more basic than expected.
Dawkins is great so I bought this book without looking. As a 28-year old molecular biologist this book was way too basic for me, and would probably be more suited to a teenage... Read more
Published 2 months ago by headandneck
2.0 out of 5 stars Dissapointing
Read this book if you must (it does have some really good parts) but please do so with a little scepticism. Read more
Published 2 months ago by J M Brooks
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