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The Luddite Girls
 
 

The Luddite Girls [Kindle Edition]

Karen Dee
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

What happens when three girls working as secretaries discover that the company they are working for is planning on launching a product that will make millions of secretaries redundant? They turn into Luddites!

Essex blonde Sheila Bright, feisty Geordie redhead Caroline (“Caro”) North and patrician, black Rodean-educated Roberta (“Bobbie”) Stone all work as secretaries for “Computers, Communications and Cybernetics.” But their employer is planning on launching a new product called the Virtual Secretary – a combined Virtual Reality headset and smart software that can effectively mimic the function of a real secretary – and without needing wages! Realizing that this is likely to throw them and millions of other women out of their jobs across the world, they decide to sabotage the project!

This is a hilarious account of what three determined young women will do to keep their jobs – and what friends will do for one another!


EXTRACT:

“Well we’ll just have to stop them!” Bobbie declares, like she’s Churchill and 3C are the Germans.

“But how?” I ask.

“By taking a leaf out of the Luddites’ book if necessary.” This is Bobbie again.

“The who?”

“The Luddites.”

“Do you mean what I think you mean?” This is Caro, a fiery redhead from up North.

“We have no alternative.” This is Bobbie.

“What do you mean?” And this is me again.

“I mean we’ll have to smash their bloody machines!’

Bobbie was never one to mince her words.

“We’ll also get ourselves sacked - not to mention arrested!” And Caro was never one to hold back on the put-downs.

“I don’t mean literally smash their machines, Caro. I mean sabotage the project.”

They’re about to have a two-way argument — like I’m part of the furniture. It drives me potty when they do that. Only I’m not going to let them.

“And ’ow are we going to do that?” I ask.

Bobbie looks at me for a moment, like she’s angry. Actually I think she’s stumped. Suddenly I get an idea.

“You can always have a go at getting some info from Haines.”

Maybe I shouldn’t have said it. I tend to agree with Caro, that Bobbie’s crazy scheme is a non-starter. But half the time they were ignoring me, and when Bobbie finally gave me an “in” I guess I fell for it and decided to show that I had something to contribute.

“Who?”

We’re all smiling now. They said this in unison and they’re both looking at me. All of a sudden I’m the centre of attention. I notice that we seem to have converged on the centre of the living room. I decide to draw out them moment. I sit down on the carpet, where we were a few minutes ago. The others join me. All of a sudden I’m calling the shots.

“There’s this guy in software called Haines. He’s the smartest guy there, apart from the head of the department – a sort of first among equals. If you want any information about software, he should be your first port of call.”

I’m beginning to enjoy this. They’re hanging on to my every word.

“And what makes you think she can get any information out of him?

I smile gleefully and lick my lips.

“Cause, he hasn’t got a girlfriend.”

Now Bobbie’s smiling, like she agrees with my logic. Then she looks at Caro, who just nods… like she doesn’t trust her voice.

“Okay let’s make a pact.”

Suddenly she raises her coffee cup like it’s a glass of wine or something. Caro does likewise, somewhat awkwardly. Not wanting to break ranks with the majority now that we’re all finally together, I do likewise.

“All for one and one for all?” I suggest. Well, it seemed like a clever thing to say at the time. Caro looks at me like I’ve just farted during the queen’s speech.

“No, that’s the three musketeers,” says Bobbie, as if I didn’t know. “Let’s think.”

She closes her eyes for a few seconds and then opens them.

“Okay, from now on we’ll call ourselves…” She thrusts her cup forward (her coffee cup I mean). “The Luddite Girls.”

Caro and I look at each other and sort of “nod” with our eyes. “The Luddite Girls!” we echo.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 280 KB
  • Print Length: 220 pages
  • Publisher: House of Solomon (14 July 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S. r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005CXOOO8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #365,778 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Satiric humour at its best 22 July 2011
By bekay
Format:Kindle Edition
If you - like me - think that the art of satire is not dead, then you will like this book. It's about three young ladies from different backgrounds who share a flat and work at the same computer company. But what really brings them together is their attempt to sabotage a project at the company which employs them because they think it is a threat to their livelihood, as well as that of many other women.

In the process, they discover that they have abilities that they didn't even dream of and they realize that life's doors are by no means closed to them. To counter-balance, this lively collection of females, there are also various interesting male characters, such as a puerile computer programmer, a shy, nerdy hardware engineer and an amusing foppish chairman.

The book works very cleverly towards a tense and amusing climax when the company plans to unveil their new product to the industry.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Take Three Girls... 21 July 2011
By SbrKaye
Format:Kindle Edition
I've always resented the frivolous comparison between the great women writers of the past and the "chick-lit" authors of today. Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell and George Eliot dealt with more serious issues than exfoliation and weight gain. Austen addressed the precarious and vulnerable position of women in society and the limits to their capacity for self-fulfilment, Emily Bronte dealt with the crucial and still unresolved Nature-versus-Nurture debate, whilst Elizabeth Gaskell and George Eliot wrote about a great swathe of issues including politics, religion, envy, guilt and self-sacrifice.

But, on the other hand, I also resent the patronising dismissal of modern "chick lit" as being lightweight. Even a woman's anxieties about being overweight, or about her biological clock, reflect the position of women in society today.

I mention these points as a preface to my review of Karen Dee's "The Luddite Girls" because although this book is classified as chick-lit, I would describe it more as the 21st century equivalent of the great women's literature of the past. Under the guise of a humorous story about three secretaries trying to sabotage a computer project at the company they work for, this short novel explores that recurring theme of the role of women in a society that professes to offer gender equality, but in practice falls short of its much-vaunted credo.

By using different first-person viewpoints in the narrative, (a method employed by such giants of literature as Emily Bronte), Dee also looks at different types of women, how they see themselves and most crucially, how society causes them to see themselves. This last is perhaps the most interesting feature of the book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Chick-lit with something extra 5 Nov 2011
By Aramat
Format:Kindle Edition
A rollicking adventure about three secretaries who decide to take down a computer project that their company is about to launch because they think it will cause mass redundancy of their "sisters". This humorous little book is neither anti-feminist nor anti-technology. But it does make some very sharp social comment on our society - as much as Chaplin's celebrated film. A sort of Modern Times for modern times.
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Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Girls a-quiet 27 July 2011
By Cactus Flower - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
I read this for fun, expecting a light read. (Maybe I should have read the reviews more carefully). It was actually what I would call a serious story written in a humorous style. More George Bernard Shaw than Oscar Wilde. More H G Wells than Jules Verne. (Yes, it even takes a few pot-shots at corporate capitalism, which our Fabian Socialist friends would no doubt approve of.) It is a fun story. This tale of three secretaries trying to sabotage a project that they have decided is a threat to their livelihood, has all the opportunities for humour that one could hope for. And Karen Dee does milk these opportunities for all they are worth. Perhaps I am being unfair because the book was not quite what I expected. Also it was rather short, even by the standards of the genre.
5.0 out of 5 stars Girls with Spanners 28 Nov 2011
By Aramat - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
A rollicking adventure about three secretaries who decide to take down a computer project that their company is about to launch because they think it will cause mass redundancy of their "sisters". This humorous little book is neither anti-feminist nor anti-technology. But it does make some very sharp social comment on our society - as much as Chaplin's celebrated film. A sort of Modern Times for modern times.
5.0 out of 5 stars No longer available on Amazon 19 Aug 2008
By David Kessler - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
This eBook is no longer available from Amazon. It is only available from [...] as an audiobook - and will later be available as an eBook.

It is however an excellent book and well worth getting.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Chic Lit is for Chics 31 Mar 2012
By J. LoBasso - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I absolutely hated this book about three secretaries, stereotyped as brainless, who sabotage a corporate invention that will eliminate their jobs. Perhaps if I went into the book with the idea of a light farce, it would have been somewhat enjoyable, but I didn't approach it that way and was sorry I started to read this at all.

The characters were shallow, predictably able to outsmart the smartest of the computer geeks, and put the male chauvinist bosses in their place. Everything was highly implausible, not well written, and had an ending that belonged in another book.

Even for free, it wasn't worth the trouble.
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