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The Lost Museum Hardcover – 30 Oct 1997


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (USA); 1 edition (30 Oct 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465041949
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465041947
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 3 x 23.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,554,380 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Synopsis

Between 1939 and 1944, as the Nazis overran Europe, they were also quietly conducting another type of pillage. The Lost Museum tells the story of the Jewish art collectors and gallery owners in France who were stripped of rare works by artists such as Vermeer, Rembrandt, Degas, Czanne, and Picasso. Before they were through, the Nazis had taken more than 20,000 paintings, sculptures, and drawings from France. Between 1939 and 1944, as the Nazis overran Europe, they were also quietly conducting another type of pillage. The Lost Museum tells the story of the Jewish art collectors and gallery owners in France who were stripped of rare works by artists such as Vermeer, Rembrandt, Degas, Czanne, and Picasso. Before they were through, the Nazis had taken more than 20,000 paintings, sculptures, and drawings from France. The Lost Museum explores the Nazis systematic confiscation of these artworks, focusing on the private collections of five families: Rothschild, Rosenberg, Bernheim-Jeune, David-Weill, and Schloss.

The book is filled with private family photos of this art, some of which has never before been seen by the public, and it traces the fate of these works as they passed through the hands of top German officials, unscrupulous art dealers, and unwitting auction houses such as Christies and Sothebys.


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To begin this intricate story we must first go to the Louvre Museum in Paris. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ms. Bernardi on 17 Dec 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Those who wish to understand better how the Nazis, governments and private individuals profited by the theft and sales of fine art in France and other parts of Europe during WWII should consider this an essential reference.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By RAYMOND H W SMITH on 20 Mar 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the first time I have read a non-fiction book which leaves me hopeing there will be sequel as the story continues to unravel
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 21 reviews
39 of 43 people found the following review helpful
A fascinating story poorly told 3 Jun 1999
By Bragan Thomas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Those of you who read Lynn Nicholas' astonishing The Rape of Europa will be disappointed by this book, which is in many ways a necessary supplement to Nicholas' spine-tingling work. The record of greed, fear, coercion and barbarism visible behind the glittering surface of the Parisian art world in the 1940's is a truly moving human story. The photographs, all of now-vanished works of modern art, provide a valuable record for the historian, as many of the lost works have never been published. Unfortunately, the book is nearly ruined by a flat and pedestrian writing style. The author may have taken years to write this book, and conducted hundreds of interviews, but one would never know that. Feliciano writes as if he were a USA Today reporter - utterly superficial treatments of serious issues and no sign whatsoever of any personal investment in the story. The art and personalities of the period deserved a better historian than Mr. Feliciano, I am sorry to say. Useful for the documentary information only.
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
The most important art book in a decade 21 Jun 2007
By Lisa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Other books may relate how the Nazis plundered art, but this book actually led the world to do something about it. You know how you read in the paper all the time that some heir of a Holocaust victim is in a lawsuit to get back valuable paintings? It's directly a result of The Lost Museum. For fifty years, nothing happened in terms of restitution. Feliciano's groundbreaking investigative research is what led museums to examine the provenance of their artwork, caused governments to change their statutes of limitations, and urged heirs to pursue artworks they assumed had long ago vanished.

I wish I could give it more than five stars.
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
A Big Hit in France? Go Figure... 8 July 2008
By Amy Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This was a big hit in France when it came out, but as an English-language book it suffers by comparison to Lynn Nicholas's magisterial 'Rape of Europa,' a vastly better book on the same topic--better written and better researched. Feliciano takes what is, in and of itself, a fascinating, profound story and cheapens it with his overheated writing style. Also, he claims to have made a lot of new documentary discoveries--the Schenker papers, documenting the shipment of looted works within France--which aren't so new, as anyone who reads Nicholas's book knows. Those documents have been publicly accessible since the late 1970s. On the whole I would not recommend this book, but would recommend the Rape of Europa instead.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
A really interesting part of WWII that I never knew before. 2 April 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A fascinating story about another way the Germans persecuted the countries they conquered during WWII. The writing is not great and there are problems of a linear time-line, but overall an interesting read because it is very obvious the author did a lot of research into this seldom written about part of the war.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
German arrogance and art dealer greed in WWII. 30 Jun 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A repititious summary of art work confiscations by the Nazis, particularly from Jewish galleries, during World War II. Plentiful accusations of greed by cooperating art dealers, including some famous names, during and after the war. The French government to this day has performed questionably in returning works by famous artists to their pre-war owners. The Swiss government, in harmony with its management of Jewish refugee bank deposits, has performed even worse. Over-all, a depressing litany of evil deeds in a poorly structured account of art world activity during the German occupation of France.
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