£6.55
  • RRP: £7.03
  • You Save: £0.48 (7%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Longest Journey has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Longest Journey Paperback – 10 Feb 2014

4.1 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 10 Feb 2014
£6.55
£5.22 £6.48
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£6.55 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Longest Journey
  • +
  • Maurice (Penguin Classics)
Total price: £16.53
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 220 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (10 Feb. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1495446719
  • ISBN-13: 978-1495446719
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.3 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 717,580 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Perhaps the most brilliant, the most dramatic, and the most passionate of [Forster's] works. (Lionel Trilling) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Edward Morgan Forster (1879–1970), was an English novelist, short story writer, essayist and librettist. He is known best for his ironic and well-plotted novels examining class difference and hypocrisy in early 20th-century British society. Forster's humanistic impulse toward understanding and sympathy may be aptly summed up in the epigraph to his 1910 novel Howards End: "Only connect". Forster had five novels published in his lifetime. Forster's third novel, A Room with a View (1908), is his lightest and most optimistic. It was started before any of his others, as early as 1901, and exists in earlier forms referred to as "Lucy". The book is the story of young Lucy Honeychurch's trip to Italy with her cousin, and the choice she must make between the free-thinking George Emerson and the repressed aesthete Cecil Vyse. George's father Mr Emerson quotes thinkers who influenced Forster, including Samuel Butler. A Room with a View was filmed by Merchant-Ivory in 1985.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I read recently that some hitherto unknown letters of Forster's had been made public. The author of the article expressed surprise that some of the letters betrayed in Forster a significant amount of misogyny. How, wondered the author, could the creator of the wonderfully sympathetic Mrs. Moore, possibly have disliked women? Clearly, that particular author had never read The Longest Journey (or perhaps anything by Forster apart from a A Passage to India). The least known of Forster's six novels it nonetheless contains all of his familiar preoccupations including very definitely the destructive dominance of sensitive, truth loving men by hard-faced, small-minded women.

When he stopped writing novels after 1924 Forster said that he was tired of only being able to create certain character types. These could be said to full into three categories, the classically-trained, beauty-seeking person, the uneducated, simple, id-driven but fundamentally honest person and finally the dishonest, manipulative and worldly person. Throughout the novels many who fit into this last category are women and in Agnes Pembroke he creates one of his most truly repulsive characters. She is materialistic and dull and does everything she can to prevent her husband Rickie from remaining true to himself and pursuing his literary and spiritual dreams.

This is sometimes quite difficult to read but whether or not one accepts it as an accurate representation of what really happens or rejects it as abject misogyny it is difficult not to admire the way Forster elegantly and simply presents his story. Add into the mix typical Forsterian plot devices as gradually new pieces of information about the past are revealed and characters meet again in rather unexpected circumstances and you have a fine piece of work that probably tells you as much about Forster himself as anything else he ever wrote.
Comment 6 of 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is, by my reckoning, E.M. Forster's most personal novel. Indeed everything in `Two Cheers for Democracy' and his letters can be seen in embryonic form here. Starting with the aesthetic, a love for a picture of Stockholm which the uninformed would mistake for Venice [13] (a preference which, to express an interest, I share personally). It also delves deeply in to human consciousness, class, sensitivity, trust and acceptance. The three parts, Cambridge, Sawston (back again), and Wiltshire are perfectly sectioned off and do enough to create the feeling of montage and bildungsroman for Rickie.

The jokes about respectability start quickly and come fast and furious, for example "aunt Emily never pushes anybody lest they rebound and crush her" [20], social protocol is treated with an utmost vehemence at the height of Forster's preaching and casual indifference at other times. English "respectability" is slammed again through the rationalist separation of love in two categories, desire and imagination. Desire is seen as inferior by the English [66]. Agnes is the stereotype of the person who imagines themselves to be unconventional whereas Stephen is really the unconventional one and the personality that most attracts Rickie.

As with all Forster novels the landscape flows in to the story and during some of the descriptions the characters are flung in to a separate dimension and we find that our feet stand in the dell, on the plains of Wiltshire or in the suffocating tightness of Sawston. The two landscapes that are the most important to understanding the human condition and the environment are the dell and the Chilterns.
Read more ›
Comment 4 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
'The Longest Journey' is undoubtedly the most personal of Forster's novels, and is in places semi-autobiographical - he used members of his family for inspiration for a few characters. It is quite easy to read compared to the more critically accepted favourites such as 'A Passage to India' and 'Howards End', and is in fact perhaps my favourite Forster novel. It seems in places unsure in style and structure whether it is trying to be ever so slightly modernist or sticking to a traditional narrative style. Rickie's decline from the intellectual Cambridge circle to control by the domineering Agnes is pathetic in the true sense, and the end is touching in its unexpectedness. The only problem with this edition is the fact that p207 is printed twice and there is no p208 - thankfully I had another edition of it anyway. I recommend, therefore, that people wait until the new Penguin edition comes out so that they don't miss what is quite an important page in the context of the novel.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Forster said that The Longest Journey was "the least popular of my five novels, but the one I am most glad to have written. For in it I have managed to get nearer than elsewhere towards what was in my mind-or rather towards that junction of mind and art where creativity sparks."

It is probably Forster's most autobiographical book, the central character, Rickie Elliot, being an aspiring writer who attends Cambridge University. (Although in the novel, Elliot marries and goes so far as to produce a child, something Forster had no wish to do.)

The novel is illuminated with flashes of Forster's laconic wit:

"Mr. Pembroke was speechless, and--such is human nature--he chiefly resented the allusion to the hot bottle; an unmanly luxury in which he never indulged; contenting himself with nightsocks."

Yet at the same time one can see why it is the least popular of his novels. The sequence of events related is less plausible than in Room with a View or Howard's End. And the idea of equipping Elliot with a limp, presumably because Forster himself felt in some way handicapped, is to my mind rather cheesy. (The central character with limp device was repeated in Of Human Bondage, Somerset Maugham's 1915 novel.)

I listened to the audio CD version published by Blackstone. There is some confusion about the identity of the reader with this product. The cardboard package announces that the book is "Read by Wanda McCaddon". And that is also the information currently given on amazon.uk. But text printed on the CDs tells us that the book is "read by Nadia May". Listening to the recording, I'm fairly sure it is Nadia May. She's an excellent Forster reader and I would have bought the book anyway: still, someone has blundered.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback