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The Living Daylights [DVD] [1987]


Price: £5.46 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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£5.46 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 3 left in stock. Sold by Leisurezone and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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The Living Daylights [DVD] [1987] + On Her Majesty's Secret Service [DVD] [1969]
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Product details

  • Actors: Timothy Dalton, Maryam d'Abo, Jeroen Krabbé, John Rhys-Davies, Joe Don Baker
  • Directors: John Glen
  • Format: Letterboxed, PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Greek, Hindi, Norwegian, Swedish
  • Dubbed: None
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Audio Description: None
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 1 Oct. 2012
  • Run Time: 125 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (123 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008OEYCWG
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,431 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Armed with razor-sharp instincts and a licence to kill, James Bond battles diabolical arms merchants bent on world domination in this thrilling, lightning-paced adventure. Timothy Dalton brings energy, humour and ruthless cunning to his debut performance as Agent 007.

From Amazon.co.uk

The Living Daylights, new boy Timothy Dalton's first Bond outing, gets off to a rocking start with a pre-credits sequence on Gibraltar, and culminates in a witty final showdown with Joe Don Baker's arms dealer, set on a model battlefield full of toy soldiers. While the Aston Martin model whizzing through the car chase has been updated for the late 1980s--including lethal lasers and other deadly gizmos--the plot is pretty standard issue, maybe a little more cluttered and unfocused than usual, involving arms, drugs and diamond smuggling. Nevertheless, the action-formula firmly in place, this one rehearses the moves with ease and throws in some fine acting. Maryam d'Abo, playing a cellist-cum-spy, is the classy main squeeze for 007 (uncharacteristically chaste for once). Dalton, with his wolfish, intelligent features, was a perfectly serviceable secret agent, but never caught on with the viewers, perhaps because everyone was hoping for a presence as charismatic as Sean Connery's in the franchise's glory days.--Leslie Felperin

On the DVD: Casting the new Bond takes up much of the "making-of" documentary: first Sam Neill was in the running, but vetoed by Cubby Broccoli, who wanted Timothy Dalton and had considered him as far back as On Her Majesty's Secret Service (but Dalton felt he was just too young at the time). When Dalton proved unavailable, Pierce Brosnan was hired. Then, at the last minute, Brosnan's Remington Steele contract was renewed and he had to drop out. Dalton came back in, on the proviso that he could give Bond a harder, more realistic edge after the action-lite of the Roger Moore years. The second documentary attempts to profile the enigmatic Ian Fleming, who was apparently as mysterious and chameleon-like as his alter ego. The commentary is a miscellaneous selection of edited interviews from various members of the cast and crew. There's also Ah-Ha's "Living Daylights" video, and a "making-of" featurette about it. A brief deleted scene (comic relief--wisely dropped) and trailers complete another strong package. --Mark Walker --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 12 Dec. 2007
Format: DVD
As with George Lazenby, the brevity of Timothy Dalton's tenure as Bond - due to years of legal problems and lawsuits between EON and MGM/UA - has led to history merrily being rewritten by the press that once hailed him. Dalton, not the lawyers, was lined up as the fall guy with Pierce Brosnan the man who saved the series from disaster (even though Dalton's first Bond saw a massive increase in takings over Moore's last film). Those who are quick to dismiss him would do well to check out The Living Daylights.

Much of the scapegoating of Dalton seemed to come from the confusion of actor and role. At the time Dalton's Bond was the closest to Fleming's creation - more so than Connery, even - and given the right script he proved outstanding in the role. After Roger Moore's 12-year, seven-film tenure as Bond finally came to an ignominious end with A View to a Kill, as with OHMSS, Live and Let Die and Casino Royale, the producers broke in their new Bond with a more low-key, low-gadget approach, resulting in the best Bond since the Sixties, with Dalton initially looking the first Bond to seriously rival Connery. Where Connery had the danger and Moore the class, Dalton managed to combine both, with Bond's self-assurance that verges on the arrogant down pat, reclaiming the character from the increasingly comic-strip approach of too many of the later Moore films.

The film isn't without its faults - Caroline Bliss isn't up to much as Moneypenny, Maryam D'Abo's a bit of a wet leading lady while Jeroen Krabbe lacks the menace he brought to No Mercy - but it looks and feels like a classic Bond film, has little truck with gadgets and is less in thrall to silly jokes.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 31 Mar. 2005
Format: DVD
This was Timothy Dalton's first film as James Bond and after watching it the first thing that came to my mind is why do people criticise him so much. I feel he did a fantastic job of playing 007 and he is easily the best actor to have played Bond.
The film is action packed from beginning to end and Bond has to travel all over the world from England to Afghanistan. This movie has some very good scenes specially the car scene and the cello scene. The plot is a bit confusing but it is understandable and the other actors are good as well. The bond girl is different for a change and is innocent compared to previous bond girls. Koskov is cunning and manipulative. The villians are ruthless and efficient(Necros).
As for Dalton there are a few scenes where we see what a truly great actor he is.There is scene where Bond goes to kill General Puskin in his hotel room and although we know he is not going to Dalton makes you feel that he would.
I would suggest people to buy this movie if you want proper entertainment with excellent acting.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 6 Jan. 2011
Format: DVD
1987. Roger Moore had finally hung up his Walther PPK and tuxedo after `A View To A Kill', and a replacement Bond was needed for this the fifteenth big screen outing for the superspy. This is Timothy Dalton's first film in role, and he acquits himself well.

I have always enjoyed Dalton's portrayal of Bnd. Not quite as suave and sophisticate as Moore and with less of a predilection for corny one liners, his was a harder character - utterly ruthless in his determination to get the job done but not without his compassionate side. It was a portrayal (and I await the critics to shoot me down for this comment) that strongly echoed Sean Connery's early take on the character. I feel strongly that it was just what the series needed.

In this entertaining romp, Bond helps a Russian General to defect. Pretty soon the defector is snatched by a third party, and Bond is off on a hunt across Eastern Europe and Afghanistan to track him down and foil a plot involving a drugs trade and huge arms deal. It starts off feeling like another cold war drama then slowly morphs into a more sophisticated story about attempts to make huge amounts of money. It's a well constructed script, and pacily directed, jumping from one situation to the next and dishing out the thrills and spills on a regular basis. For sheer entertainment value it has to be one of the best in the series.

This digitally restored edition really is the best version of the film I have owned. The picture has been lovingly restored and cleaned up, and looks amazing. Really, I am not just saying that. It looks superb. The sound has been similarly treated and there is an option to listen to it in 5.1 DTS surround, which is truly exceptional.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Greg Jameson on 10 Jun. 2008
Format: DVD
After a lamentable descent into self-parody that started with "Diamonds Are Forever", 1987's "The Living Daylights" re-established Bond as a credible film franchise. The inspired casting (third time lucky for producer Cubby Broccoli) of talented actor Timothy Dalton pays off from the start. He establishes himself as Bond with a single look in the teasing pre-title sequence and, unlike his predecessors, is never anything other than wholly believable in the part.

Dalton's Bond ventures into the world of the grubby villains - motivated by greed rather than megalomania. Arms dealers and drug barons become the foils to Dalton's sometimes morally ambiguous Bond, which gives his films a more "real" edge. In "The Living Daylights", Joe Don Baker and Jeroen Krabbe are wonderfully entertaining as the baddies, and Dalton's assured central performance, with plenty of spectacle, makes for the best Bond movie in years, and one of the very best of all time.

Dalton's Bond has a wry, dry humour of his own, and thankfully for the most part eschews the superficially clever one-liners his predecessors were saddled with and the oft-parodied gadgetry that were used as "get out of jail free" cards by the screenwriters. This Bond relies on his wits to succeed. Such as shame Dalton only made two, but he gets off to a cracking start.
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