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The Line War (Agent Cormac 5) Paperback – 2 Sep 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Tor; Reprints edition (2 Sept. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330528459
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330528450
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.8 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 54,061 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Neal Asher lives sometimes in England, sometimes in Crete and mostly at a keyboard. Having over eighteen books published he has been accused of overproduction (despite spending far too much time ranting on his blog, cycling off fat, and drinking too much wine) but doesn't intend to slow down just yet.

http://theskinner.blogspot.com/
http://freespace.virgin.net/n.asher/

Product Description

Review

'Asher is brilliant at conveying the vastness of space, the strangeness of alien life and the sweep of planetary horizons.' -- SFX Magazine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

High-octane action in outer space - the fifth novel in his popular agent Cormac series

High-octane action in outer space -- the fifth novel in his increasingly popular Agent Cormac series


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Ed.F TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 April 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love space opera and this series, the Agent Cormac novels, has delivered in spades. Line war is billed as it's conclusion, my thoughts on that later, and contains the usual rip roaring multi threaded action we have come to expect as Cormac uncovers a very nasty conspiracy which takes him from fighting on the frontiers to the very heart of the Polity.

On the way we have gigantic space weapons, vast battle sequences, mahyem on a planetary scale, conversations with the makers of ancient booby traps and many other gripping sequences.

A great end to the series, neatly typing up nearly all the threads laid out during the previous four books but I can't see Neal Asher leaving a character as good as Cormac on the shelf for long, I wager he'll be back elsewhere in the polity metaverse, even if just as a Deus ex machina plot device.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J Stock on 27 Jan. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
First up, Asher is just about my favourite current author, right up there along with Reynolds. When I first started reading science fiction ages ago it was Banks and Asher has kind of taken his place for me.

I gave this 5 stars as I think it's worth that in its own right but also as the (supposedly) last in a great series that has given me a lot of enjoyment.

You do really need to read the preceding Agent Cormac novels first otherwise I don't think it would make much sense. If you have read the first four you shouldn't be disappointed - I certainly wasn't.

One of the things I like about the series is that the scale is vast - both in space and time. For example, we have mega-space battles and are told of the rise and fall of inter-stellar civilisations. However, we also get right down and close-up with the characters in their own personal fights and skirmishes.

Asher brings in some familiar characters from previous novels including everyone's favourite giant brass golem, a certain draconic enigma and one of personal faves, the AI from a massive spaceship (if that counts as a character).

We follow various characters from their own personal perspectives but everything is neatly brought together. Previously unexplained matters or unanswered questions are developed and addressed, e.g. in relation to the origins of Jain tech and regarding Cormac himself.

I thought that it was well-paced throughout and built to a nice extended crescendo on lots of levels with plenty of intrigue and plot twists along the way. I really liked the ending which I think did justice to an immensely enjoyable series.

The dialogue is sharp as always and much of the humour and the best lines, as before, comes from idiosyncratic war drones with real attitude and also a "ghost" who spars with a demented AI.

A really great read and I'm just sorry that I've finished it.
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By James on 30 April 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Only 4/5 because I thought it could be a little shorter, on the other hand it brings together plot strings from most (if not all) the other Cormac novels. It ties off the plot nicely while it also leaves the possibility for further books in the series so you learn more about the Jain, the Dragon and most important Earth Central and Cormac himself.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By 2theD on 11 Oct. 2011
Format: Hardcover
Backing off the prior emphasis of big battles and baddie beasties, Asher takes a more direct, traditional approach to a novel- a plot. Similar in standard to Gridlink, where he first created his Ian Cormac series, Asher has decided once again to put his one-trick pony show off to the side while actually trying to wrap up the series once and for all. Granted, there must be blood and blasts somewhere in the novel for Asher-sake, but it's definitely toned down.

Whereas the last three books have seen a cavalcade of enemies, horrific animals and flora and a slow evolution of the Polity's relationship with Dragon, only now in Book Five does the Dragon/Polity relationship, the Jain/Dragon relationship and the Cormac/Earth Central relationship come into play. These three pillars of the plot foundation assure the long-term Asher reader (this being my eleventh to-date) a solid good read with many glimpses of truth in the relationships stated above.

My once hitch is my once held notion that the Jain technology was one with a ferocious appetite for submission and destruction; now in Book Five we see much of dead or hibernating Jain tech. All of this Jain is repeatedly described as coral-like structures, ad nauseum. Even the live Jain tech is always portrayed as silver tendrils. It would have been nice to see a change of vocabulary regarding these adjectives but Asher does ramp up the vocab throughout the novel, though not enough for having me reach for my dictionary.

Through all the wonderful things Jain tech can do, during the trials Cormac finds himself in with his new capabilities and at the all the points where the AIs bestow their wisdom and humor to the cast is where Asher finds his niche in Book Five here. From one toehold to the next, the reader to taken casually through the well-structured, well-plotted and well-defined novel which isn't too flashy or too blasé. Not quite a re-read but well worth it for any Asher fan following the series!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mark Chitty on 14 Feb. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Finally I've come to the last Agent Cormac book, Line War, and up to now it's been a ride of ups and downs. The first two books, Gridlinked and The Line of Polity, were rather enjoyable, but they did have their issues. After that came Brass Man and Polity Agent, both of which upped the stakes and delivered some really great sci-fi. Now with Line War the story comes to a conclusion, and while it ends the series as a whole I always had that niggle of a doubt in my mind that it might not be as spectacular as I hoped. All totally unfounded of course, as Line War not only closes the series in style, it is one of the best books I've read in quite a while.

Line War picks up where Polity Agent left us, with Erebus, the rogue melded AI with Jain tech at its disposal, a serious threat to the Polity and starting to make attacks on certain Polity systems on the Line. Orlandine, a haiman (AI-Human meld), is still hiding from the ruling Polity AI's with her Jain tech research, but soon is enlisted by Fiddler Randal (a ghost in Erebus' machine) in a plot to destroy Erebus once and for all. Fiddler Randal doesn't stop there and also recruits Mr Crane, the deadly and legendary brass Golem along with Vulture, a former warship AI, into his plot. Dragon is back and on its own quest to stop the Jain tech from spreading through and destroying the Polity with the help of Mika. And then we have Ian Cormac, agent of Earth Central Security, whose developing underspace sense is helping him in many surprising ways.

First things first. Line War is the fifth and final Ian Cormac novel, so in all honesty there is really no point reading this novel if you've not read at least most of the previous ones.
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