Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Lighthouse Keeper Paperback – 1 May 2012


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£0.64 £0.29


Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Snowbooks Ltd (1 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1907777628
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907777622
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 355,355 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Alan K Baker was born in Birmingham in 1964. After leaving university in 1991, he endured a series of increasingly unpleasant jobs, culminating in a nine-month stint as a meat-packer in a Sheffield sausage factory, which served to increase his fascination with the macabre and outlandish. Since 1997, he has published a number of non-fiction books on the paranormal and popular history, which have been translated into seven languages.

"The Martian Ambassador" is his first published novel. "Dyatlov Pass", his unpublished science fiction thriller inspired by the unexplained deaths of nine ski-hikers in the Ural Mountains in 1959, has been optioned for film by director Simon Fellows and screenwriter/novelist Andy Briggs.

Product Description

Book Description

A TERRIFYING MYSTERY OF THE SEA

In December 1900, three lighthouse keepers vanished without
trace from the remote Scottish island of Eilean Mòr. An emergency relief crew
was sent to man the lighthouse. At the end of their month-long duty, they
resigned from their posts, and never spoke of what they had experienced on the
island. The mystery of Eilean Mòr has never been solved. Until now.

In the present, a group of environmental researchers arrives
on the island to observe the wildlife. While exploring the lighthouse, now
automated and deserted, one of the team discovers a manuscript written by one
of the relief keepers, a man named Alec Dalemore. As a sudden storm moves in,
cutting off their escape, the researchers come to realise that Dalemore wrote
the manuscript as a warning to all the lighthouse keepers who would come after
him. A warning of something on Eilean Mòr and in the surrounding ocean -
something ancient and powerful, and strange beyond imagining...

The Lighthouse Keeper is a supernatural tale based on the Flannan Isles
mystery, one of the greatest unsolved enigmas in maritime history. Blending
factual firsthand reports with speculative fiction, the novel takes the reader
on a journey to the edge of reality, where the greatest of human fears - the
fear of the unknown - holds dominion.                         

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Landgirl on 16 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback
I got The Lighthouse Keeper out of curiosity to see what the author did with the well known true story of the disappeared keepers. I was sorely disappointed. Despite all the familiar devices--a tale within a tale, an ancient book in the library, and parallel narratives, the story collapsed at the end like a cake that met with an unfortunate chill just as it was rising.

The description of the setting is apt and evocative. How could a ghost story set on a mysterious Scottish island fail to capture the imagination? Yet, for me, it failed badly.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr Carter on 7 Sept. 2012
Format: Paperback
( review of audible audiobook) This is quite a good book, with a strong atmosphere and a very Lovecraftian feel of "things Man was not meant to know and "non-Euclidian shapes from beyond space and time". It is intriguing, unnerving, but the author chooses to end without any explanation ( granted, explanations of mysteries on this scale could not be grasped by our puny minds) and that defeats, in my opinion, the purpose of the book, which because of this failure becomes a long exercise in prose about the unknowable. In a similar vein, "Dark Matter", by Michelle Paver, read by Jeremy Northam, manages to be bizarre AND extremely entertaining...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By brienneselwyn on 8 July 2012
Format: Paperback
My Expectations
Based on my experience with the previous books by Alan K. Baker and after the book description I expected a most entertaining and excellent written book that would drive me to the edge of my chair. I was pretty nosey to see how Alan K Baker would explain the vanish of the three lighthouse keepers and if he keeps his promise stated in the last sentence of the book description:
"[...], the novel takes the reader on a journey to the edge of reality, where the greatest of human fears - the fear of the unknown - holds dominion.

The Delivery
I read the 276 pages in two sessions which is not usual for me and should give you a first hint that I have been hooked by the story.

Within the first 21 pages Alan K. Tuner delivers the full set up for the story. After the introduction done by a telegram from 26 December 1900 the author moves forward to the year 1999 on Sunday 19 July, 4.30 PM, location Eilean Mòr (= big isle) part of the Flannan Isles. We meet a group of people - Jennifer Leigh, Donald Webb, Max Kaminsky, Nick Bowman - all working for the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) and Rebecca Garratt who is in her first year of her MA in history.
Of course there are certain relationships in between the protagonists which I do not explain. Beside that there are only two more information (one vague and one precise) necessary to set the wheel in motion.
Some unusual things happen and Rebecca discovers a book:
The Testament of Alec Dalemore, Occasional Keeper

From that point on the story continues with two interwoven narrative threads. There are the events of the group itself and then they read together the discovered book which contains the story of Alec Dalemore. A story which starts on 5th of January 1901. Alan K.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Thorn Steafel on 2 Jan. 2014
Format: Audio Download
This book sucked me in; took a while to get into its style, but I couldn't put it down for the last two thirds! One of the those finish-at-3-am-though-you-need-to-be-up-for-work affairs. I remember back in high school being set the Flannan Isle disappearances in English and everyone being asked to write a piece imagining what happened. This book has the same unfettered imagination going for it. From the reviews, I guess you'll either like or not like it, and quickly. (I personally love HP Lovecraft's fiction but if I'd read the reviews on here comparing it to Lovecraft's best, it would have been to this book's detriment.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Once again Alan K. Baker tackles a real life incident and gives it his unique spin (his other book I recently read is "Dyatlov Pass"). This time we travel to the mysterious Flannan Islands to unravel the disappearance of a lighthouse crew in the '800s and its eerie repercussions on a modern research team. Once again the Author provides excellent documentation on the real life events and builds on them to craft a richly lovecraftian tale. Don't expect the clichéd tentacle monstrosities though; this novel reads more like a very good episode of "The Twilight Zone" than a bog-standard Call of Cthulhu roleplaying scenario. It definitely deserves a place in any Lovecraft-centered library.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Cumbrianblue11 on 12 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have to agree with some of the other reviewers, the book is well written. but the ending gave me the impression that the author had run out of ideas
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback