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The Light Fantastic: (Discworld Novel 2) (Discworld Novels) Paperback – 1 Sep 2004


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The Light Fantastic: (Discworld Novel 2) (Discworld Novels) + Equal Rites: (Discworld Novel 3) (Discworld Novels) + The Colour of Magic: The First  Discworld Novel: 1
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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi; New Ed edition (1 Sep 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552152595
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552152594
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (113 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 281,540 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Terry Pratchett is the acclaimed creator of the global bestselling Discworld series, the first of which, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983. In all, he is the author of fifty bestselling books. His novels have been widely adapted for stage and screen, and he is the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal, as well as being awarded a knighthood for services to literature. Worldwide sales of his books now stand at 70 million, and they have been translated into thirty-seven languages.

Photography © David Bird

Product Description

Review

"'He is a satirist of enormous talent..Incredibly funny, compulsively readable'" (The Times)

"'He would be amusing in any form and his spectacular inventiveness makes the Discworld series one of the perennial joys of modern fiction'" (Daily Mail)

"'Pure fantastic delight'" (Time Out)

"'A true original among contemporary writers'" (The Times)

Book Description

The second Discworld novel.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Francois The Armaldo VINE VOICE on 28 July 2005
Format: Paperback
Although a direct sequel to The Colour Of Magic, The Light Fantastic can stand on it's own-and it certainly does.
I read this book with no previous knowledge of the discworld series, and I loved it to bits.
What makes this story so incredibly funny is the motley crew of characters; Rincewind the wizard-a self proclaimed coward with a deadpan sense of humour who'd rather sit down and have a beer than save the world; Twoflower-the endearlingly stereotypical tourist who unintentionally annoys the living hell out of every person he meets; and finally the infamous Luggage; an adorable little carry case with legs (and a mind) of it's own.
These three may cause more trouble than they prevent, but now it's up to them to save the Discworld from collison with a Red Star.
Don't you just know it's all going to go horribly wrong?
This was a truly fun read, and I can't wait to buy more in the discworld series.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Stephen A. Haines HALL OF FAME on 30 Jan 2007
Format: Paperback
Having introduced the Discworld to Roundworld readers with "The Colour of Magic", Terry Pratchett enhances our knowledge of it through this volume. New characters, previously unexplored regions of the Disc and deep questions about The Great A'Tuin almost garner answers. Rincewind, the failed wizard, is still acting as a guide to Discworld's first tourist, Twoflower. It's not always clear however, who's doing the leading and who the following. Twoflower, who is thrilled by everything and refuses to feel threatened by anything, absorbs all the novelty introduced to the reader. Through it all, Pratchett's delightful wit and innovative abilities keeps the reader's full attention. Only your laughter will interrupt the flow of narrative.

There's magic to this book, and no little magic in the story. Rincewind, having been catapulted over the Rim marking the edge of the Disc, inexplicably finds himself lodged in a pine tree. The entire universe has been rearranged to let him survive. Why should one timid outcast be so favoured? Twoflower, in a side gesture of cosmological justice, isn't far off. Rejoined, the pair struggle to find a way home to Ankh-Morpork. A sense of urgency over that return has appeared in the sky - and the Disc is likely to be destroyed soon.

Rincewind's role in changing the universe and coping with a "new star" that's appeared soon become apparent. As a student wizard, one of The Eight Great Spells entered his mind. Those spells are the glue holding the cosmos together. To survive, the Spell must keep Rincewind alive - not out of danger, but a survivor of many dire threats. Even Twoflower has noticed Rincewind's special role in life. The tourist has actually counted the number of Rincewind's near-death experiences.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua VINE VOICE on 15 April 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"The Light Fantastic" is the second book in Terry Pratchett's hugely popular Discworld Series. He has gone on to win the Carnegie Medal for "The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents" and was awarded the OBE in 1998.

"The Light Fantastic" follows on directly from "The Color of Magic", and focuses on the same two characters : Rincewind and Twoflower. Twoflower, from the Counterweight Continent, is the Discworld's first tourist and had employed Rincewind (a single-spell wizard, a native of Ankh-Morpork and a coward of some renown) as his guide. As "The Color of Magic" closed, both characters were close to Krull - Twoflower was boldly going where no tourist had gone before, while Rincewind was in a rather precarious position. (You could say "The Color of Magic" finished with a cliff-hanger). A standard wizard may have been able to save himself, but the only spell Rincewind knows came from the Octavo - the Creator's spell book, which had been carelessly left behind after the universe's completion. He doesn't know what it does, but it's so powerful that no other spell is brave enough to stay in his head. Fortunately, as the book begins, the spell realises that any harm to Rincewind may be fatal to itself - so, it contributes to Rincewind and Twoflower finding a way out of their current situations.

While "The Color of Magic" saw the two characters generally running away in random directions, there seems to be more of a point to their actions in this book. Rincewind has started suffering from homesickness and wants to return to Ankh-Morpork. His spell is also rather keen on this idea. This, Rincewind suspects, is connected to the strange new red star that has appeared in the sky - he fears it may also involve saving the world.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Sebastian Fernandez on 23 Mar 2005
Format: Paperback
For those of you that are not familiar with Discworld, let me give you a very brief introduction to this magnificent world, which has the shape of a disc, and stands on top of four elephants, which in turn are supported by a giant turtle named A'Thuin. Philosophers have asked themselves two questions throughout history: a) what is the turtle's sex? b) where is the turtle going? Pratchett assures us that we are very close to finding the answer to the second question.
Now, I have to tell you, if you have not read "The Color of Magic", you should get it and start your journey there. This second book stands on its own, but it is considerably more enjoyable if you have the prior book as background. Besides, "The Light Fantastic" picks up the action exactly where "The Color of Magic" ended. Rincewind, the most inept magician in Discworld, and Twoflower, the extravagant tourist, are in a spaceship in the space surrounding the Disc. But soon enough Rincewind is expelled from the ship and starts to roam through the cosmos.
Meanwhile, in the cellars of the Unseen University, the Octavo, a book left behind by the Creator of the Universe, is showing a disturbing behavior. The Octavo contained the eight most important spells (eight is a crucial number in Discworld) in the world until Rincewind had one of them accidentally transferred to into his head. Now, the eight spells are needed by Hogswatch night or Discworld will be destroyed. This places Rincewind in a very important role, but one that may be extremely dangerous too.
Pratchett's humor is sublime; the author presents cleverly crafted situations that show dazzling parallelisms with our world.
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