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The Leadership Code: Five Rules to Lead by: The Five Things Great Leaders Do Hardcover – 1 Jan 2009

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Business School Press (1 Jan. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9781422119013
  • ISBN-13: 978-1422119013
  • ASIN: 1422119017
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 14.6 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 243,012 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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About the Author

Dave Ulrich is Professor of Business at the University of Michigan and a partner at The RBL Group.

Norm Smallwood is cofounder of The RBL Group and coauthor of five books, including Results-Based Leadership.

Kate Sweetman is leadership development consultant and a former editor at Harvard Business Review.


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Stan Felstead - Interchange Resources on 19 Jan. 2009
Format: Hardcover
The goal of this book is to identify the underlying framework of knowledge, skills and values coomon to all leaders. A pretty ambitious agenda.

This book synthesizes the large amount of material, eg frameworks, tools, processes and studies of leadership, to identify the essential rules that govern what efffective leaders do.

The 100 years of experience from the authors, is distilled into a short and powerful book that stands out from the vast literature on this subject. It is not without its faults, these are substantially outweighed by the strengths of the book.

The basic aspects of leadership or common rules the book argues can be effectively used by all leaders, regardless of their context or organization. The five rules/leadership code are:

* Strategist - shape the future.
* Executor - make things happen.
* Talent manager - engage todays talent.
* Human capital developer - build the next generation.
* Personal proficiency - invest in yourself.

This gives you platform/guidance for developing your leadership capability. It is an improvement on the usual shopping lists of leadership competenicies/attributes that we have seen in the past.

The authors say by following this code and 60% to 70% of the leadership challenge will be met. They accept that the remaining 30% of leadership effectiveness, will depend on how you deal with specific issues that will vary from organization to organization.

The authors do not claim to have conducted to have conducted original research, but pulled together what already exists and drawing on their own experience and interviews with recognised experts on leadership.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bluedun on 25 May 2009
Format: Hardcover
Well, the basic message is fine, but the delivery puts a smoke screen over the whole thing. By the time you get through it you loose the plot somewhat. I suspect the book suffers too many cooks; everyone needing their say.

However, the basic message is worth saying.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jean Vanhoegaerden on 9 April 2009
Format: Hardcover
I am a member of faculty at ashridge business school and teach mainly leadership and change in exec ed programs, and the book is absolutely great , it is a very good overview of everything that has been written and on the other hand very practical oriented
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By Rolf Dobelli TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 11 May 2009
Format: Hardcover
Dave Ulrich, Norm Smallwood and Kate Sweetman have accomplished an almost impossible task: sifting through the overwhelming amount of information and knowledge on the nebulous subject of leadership, and actually making sense of it. They synthesize their research into five essential rules they call the "Leadership Code." They tell readers how to strategize, execute, involve employees, develop a base of talented people and how to grow as leaders. Filled with business vocabulary, this is clearly a book by businesspeople for businesspeople. Nonetheless, getAbstract recommends it to current and aspiring executives who want to crack the code to find and follow the elusive path to great leadership.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 12 reviews
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Is there a "DNA" of effective leadership? If so, what is it? 29 Jan. 2009
By Robert Morris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Those who have read any of Dave Ulrich's fifteen previously published books already know that he is one of the insightful thinkers and most eloquent writers in the contemporary business world. In his last book The Leadership Brand, Ulrich and Norm Smallwood make this affirmation: "We believe that leaders matter, but leadership matters more. We have all experienced a gifted leader who engaged all of us -- our hearts, minds, and feet. Dynamic leaders enlist us in a cause, and we willingly follow their counsel. But leadership exists when an organization produces more than one to two individual leaders. Leadership matters more because it is tied not to a person but to the process of building leaders." By no means do Ulrich and Smallwood question the importance of individual leaders. On the contrary, they assert (and I agree) that one of the most important obligations of being a leader is to strengthen or at least sustain a process by which to identify, hire, develop, and then retain high-impact leaders at all levels and in all areas throughout her or his organization.

Efforts to write most of the best business books are driven by an important question (e.g. How can a company "leap" from good to great?) and, in fact, this book responds to two basic sets of questions:

"1. What percent of effective leadership is basically the same? Are there common rules that any leader anywhere must master? Is there a recognizable leadership code?

2. If there are common rules that all leaders must master, what are they?"

Stated another way, is there a "DNA" of effective leadership? If so, what is it? Are leaders born with it or can it be developed? In this book, Ulrich, Smallwood, and Sweetman respond to these questions. They offer "a unified way of [begin italics] thinking about] being a better leader and [being] a better leader." After rigorous and extensive research, "we have discovered and validated what we now know to be the five essential rules all excellent leaders must follow. Since these rules form the basis for all good leaders, just as our genetic code determines our elemental core as people, we call it the [begin italics] leadership code [end italics]. " Ulrich, Smallwood, and Sweetman devote a separate chapter to each of these five essential rules. I see no need to identify them. Other reviewers have already done so. What I prefer to do, rather, is explain why I think so highly of this book. Here are three reasons.

First, the co-authors approach their reader on two separate but interdependent levels, suggesting (1) what effective leadership requires and (2) how to help others to become effective leaders. (Note: CEO Jeff Immelt spends 20-25% of his time mentoring GE's middle managers.) "Modeling the rules of leadership ensures that you lead well, but helping others master those rules guarantees success." It is important to keep in mind that the title of one of Ulrich's books, co-authored with Jack Zenger and Smallwood and published in 1999, is Results-Based Leadership. Obviously they agree with Thomas Edison that "vision without execution is hallucination." "All leaders must excel at personal proficiency...have one towering strength [e.g. impeccable integrity that inspires respect and trust]...be at least average in their `weaker' leadership domains...[and] the higher up that the leader rises, the more he or she needs to develop excellence in more than one of the four domains." I commend the co-authors on how brilliantly they explain why and how the most effective leaders help others to become effective leaders.

I also appreciate how skillfully Ulrich, Smallwood, and Sweetman establish and then sustain a direct, indeed cordial rapport with their reader. This book comes as close as a book could to approximating what would occur if they were their reader's personal mentors. Consider the following: "Strategy is being clear about where you want to go" to which Michael Porter would add, "The essence of strategy is choosing what not to do." (Page 25) "Execution is making sure that you get where you are going." (Page 53) "As you communicate, you need to consider your audience, tailoring your message differently for the boardroom and the lunchroom, and learn to succeed in both...You need to share your emotions and self, not just your intellectual ideas" (Page 85) "To build the next generation, be a human capital developer." (Page 105) "Personal proficiency is the ultimate rule of leadership, it starts by knowing yourself." (Page 129) These are not head-snapping revelations, nor do the authors make any such claim. I include them merely to suggest the co-authors' use of direct address throughout their narrative. Many who read this book will think that it was written specifically for them.

Finally, I hold this book in high regard because it provides so much information and counsel in less than 200 pages (180 to be exact). After introducing and then examining each of the "five essential rules," they explain how to ensure better leaders and leadership in the final chapter, Chapter Seven, by taking five action steps: establish a clear theory of leadership that is most appropriate to the needs and objectives of the given organization, assess all leaders and potential leaders in terms of their value (and potential value) relative to that theory, make whatever investment may be necessary to develop leaders and leadership at all levels and in all areas throughout the enterprise, and follow-up to keep all organizational practices in proper alignment. The co-authors also provide (in Appendix 7-1) a "Leadership brand assessment." Those who read this book are strongly encouraged to complete as assessment (as well as others inserted previously on Pages 21, 65, 89, and 135) and visit [...] where they have access to a wealth of resources that include Ulrich's brief video lesson on how to interpret the results of self-assessment 1, Smallwood's videos (during which he explains the customer value proposition and the strategic options matrix, and in another provides the closing chapter and a discussion of leadership brand), and Sweetman explains how the viruses tool,(figure 3-1) has worked at other companies to lower cultural barriers to the change execution process. Visitors to this Web site can also take a full-length code assessment (self or 360º) if they have not already done so.

Whenever appropriate, I like to conclude a review with an excerpt from Lao-Tzu's Tao Te Ching that expresses, in my opinion, the essence of great leaders and leadership. Here it is:

"Learn from the people
Plan with the people
Begin with what they have
Build on what they know
Of the best leaders
When the task is accomplished
The people will remark
We have done it ourselves. "
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Five rules for becoming a leader 11 May 2009
By Rolf Dobelli - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Dave Ulrich, Norm Smallwood and Kate Sweetman have accomplished an almost impossible task: sifting through the overwhelming amount of information and knowledge on the nebulous subject of leadership, and actually making sense of it. They synthesize their research into five essential rules they call the "Leadership Code." They tell readers how to strategize, execute, involve employees, develop a base of talented people and how to grow as leaders. Filled with business vocabulary, this is clearly a book by businesspeople for businesspeople. Nonetheless, getAbstract recommends it to current and aspiring executives who want to crack the code to find and follow the elusive path to great leadership.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Excellent Book - Professor M.S.Rao Author of 18 Books on Leadership 9 Mar. 2013
By Professor M.S.Rao, International Leadership Expert and Author of 30 Books on Leadership - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is one of the best leadership books I have read in my lifetime. I have used this leadership code for my new concept of leadership - "Soft Leadership". I have used this model in my book titled 'Soft Leadership: Make Others Feel More Important' which is receiving a great response globally. Also, in my research papers published by prestigious journals like 'Leader to Leader' and 'Industrial and Commercial Training' of Emerald. This book is a must read for all. It is worth investing your time. I strongly recommend reading this book.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
A "Da Vinci Code" for Leaders? 6 Jan. 2009
By Robert M. Fulmer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Is there a "Da Vinci Code" for leaders? Ulrich, Smallwood and Sweetman purport to have found "The Leadership Code," As they point out, "This leadership code, like any other code, provides both structure and guidance, and helps you know not only what to do to be a better individual leader, but also how to build better leadership capability." Since there are probably "half a million books on leaders and leader¬ship, we turned to recognized experts in the field who had...already spent years sifting through the evidence and developing their own theories." Since I was honored to be included in their acknowledgements, my review may be somewhat biased. (But if they appreciate my work on leadership skills and development, they are clearly brilliant people, right?)

From their literature review and body of interviews conducted, they con¬cluded that 60 to 70 percent of leadership effectiveness would be contained in the leadership code. Their analysis and synthesis result in a framework that they believe is accurate, logical, and useful. While many academics will turn up their noses at the lack of elegance in their research design, the book is likely to pass a more important test: perceived value and relevance to leaders on the firing line!
The Leadership Code essentially breaks down into five deceptively simple rules:
Rule 1: Shape the Future. This rule is embodied in the strategist dimension of the leader. Strategists not only envision a future, they help create it . As practical futurists, they figure out where the organization needs to go to succeed, they test these ideas pragmati¬cally against current resources (money, people, organiza¬tional capabilities), and they work with others to figure out how to get from the present to the desired future.

Rule 2: Make Things Happen. The execution dimen¬sion of leadership focuses on the question, "How can we ensure that we get to where we want to go?" Executors translate strategy into action. Executors understand how to make change happen, to assign accountability, to know which key decisions to take and which to delegate, and to make sure that teams work well together.

Rule 3: Engage Today's Talent. Leaders who optimize talent today answer the question, "Who goes with us on our business journey?" After getting "the right people on the bus, talent managers generate intense personal, professional, and organizational loyalty.
Rule 4: Build the Next Generation. Leaders who are human capital developers answer the question, "Who stays and sustains the organization for the next generation?" Just as good parents invest in helping their children succeed, human capital developers help future leaders to be successful.

Rule 5: Invest in Yourself. At the heart of the lead¬ership code--literally and figuratively--is personal proficiency. Effective leaders cannot be reduced to what they know and do. Who they are as human beings has everything to do with how much they can accomplish with and through other people. Leaders are learners: from success, failure, assignments, books, classes, people, and life itself.

The RBL Group has developed both self assessment and 360 degree feedback exercises to help readers know how well they exemplify The Leadership Code. The book is well-written, engaging and pragmatic. Cracking the leadership code might help you take your leadership to a higher level--and you don't have to worry about crazed monks trying to stop you from sharing your insights.

Robert M. Fulmer, Co-Author, The Leadership Advantage, Growing Your Company's Leaders
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A lot of substance 27 Jun. 2009
By Joel Dobbs - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Several of the previous reviews provide a good overview of the material in the book so I will not repeat it here.

There are a lot of leadership titles out there and most provide one or two insights but I found this to be one of the most substantial leadership books in terms of real actionable advice and insights that I have read in some time.

This book is not a collection of academic fluff or highly conceptual "models."It contains number us useful checklists and self-assessments derived from the author's substantial research which can easily be applied in a real business. The sections on strategy, leading change, goalsetting and preventing burnout are especially useful. It is well-written and concise. This is one I will have my entire leadership team read.
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