FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Leaderless Revolution... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Greener_Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: **SHIPPED FROM UK** We believe you will be completely satisfied with our quick and reliable service. All orders are dispatched as swiftly as possible! Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Leaderless Revolution: How Ordinary People will Take Power and Change Politics in the 21st Century Paperback – 7 Jun 2012

4.1 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£2.21 £2.00
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Leaderless Revolution: How Ordinary People will Take Power and Change Politics in the 21st Century
  • +
  • Rebooting Democracy: A Citizen's Guide to Reinventing Politics
Total price: £15.98
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster UK (7 Jun. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847396399
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847396396
  • Product Dimensions: 13.4 x 2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 159,778 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Intriguing ... the author provides many fascinating personal insights into the crises not only in Iraq, but also Afghanistan, Kosovo, Mauretania and Sudan." - "Kirkus Reviews"

About the Author

Carne Ross is a former senior British diplomat, author and journalist. Having resigned from the British foreign service after giving secret testimony to an official inquiry into the Iraq war (he was Britain's Iraq WMD and sanctions expert at the UN for over 4 years) he then set up the world's first independent diplomatic advisory group, Independent Diplomat.


Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Anarchists have a bad name. At best, your first thoughts are the rebellious Iroquois hairdo punks wearing leather jackets and listening to the Clash. An ancient picture, really. At worst, and most likely, they are the masked youth carrying vigorous aggression in their eyes. A suited and booted former British diplomat enjoying highlife and business class airline tickets would not be your first guess, surely.

Yet, in his latest book Carne Ross fiercely advocates that various forms of anarchy should be the means and end of what we strive to achieve in building local, regional and international communities. Being honest, if I was introduced to The Leaderless Revolution in that way, I would not have bothered ordering it from Amazon. I would have missed out on a very well-argued and thought-provoking read, too. Convincing? Comme ci, comme ça...

Having been following Mr Ross' work for the past few years, I may say that his career is of some inspiration for wannabe diplomats and young adepts of foreign policy-making and international relations. Fast-tracked to the FCO, he quickly joined the highest ranks of the UK's mission to the UN. Who would not dream about that? (Writing these words, my application to the UN is open in other window.) It would have been an overstatement to say that Mr Ross left the diplomatic corps in a heroic attempt to fight for his moral beliefs. Nevertheless, an underlying explanation why he did it has borne fruit with this latest book.

Strangely-structured - at least these were my early thoughts - The Leaderless Revolution begins with a number of somehow randomly chosen examples of citizens' direct participation or the lack thereof.
Read more ›
Comment 5 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book has been written by someone who has been eye to eye with the 'system'. The main thing to remember with this book is he tells you how it works, with the idea that, like knowing how an engine works means you have the information on how to fix it, -or break it. As someone who worked in the diplomatic corps, he should know. An economist he is not, an activist, he is not that either. i got the strong impression he is someone who suddenly saw a government out to make money from war and he was part of the mechanics that allowed that to happen. The death toll of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan weigh upon him hard. It caused him to resign, and become a lone world in the world of diplomacy. He gives you what he knows, but not directions, not solutions, not really, its not a hand book for revolution, only how the 'jenga towers' work, how to use the system and change things. Personally, i am not sure that is enough now. I finished the book feeling as if i had learned a some valuable things like the government has a system you have to play, but pays little mind to the people on the street, and none to the protesters outside.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A well written and enlightening book particularly regarding the author's specific experiences in his role as a British diplomat which I found at times quite startling and depressing but not altogether unexpected. The more detached our leaders become from the people they are supposed to represent the less compassionate and benevolent their decision and policy making becomes. I found intriguing the author's observation that as a diplomat you are very much encouraged to detach yourself from what "you" think is right and instead always talk about what "we" think is right but with decisions always entirely framed by what has been deemed "realistic" or "sensible" regarding the country's narrowly defined "interests". It was also counterintuitive how increased rank brings not more freedom to think freely but less as it becomes increasingly paramount that personal views do not deviate from the official line. Our leaders are entirely stuck in the accepted way of thinking, never questioning anything, leading me to wonder where exactly the accepted view of our "interests" came from in the first place. I also found it worrying the confession that "the supposedly democratic forces marshalled to check and balance our policies were pathetically feeble" as no one knows anything like as much as a diplomat on their subject resulting in a monopoly on knowledge and thus morality. These people have so much power over and so little idea of the real suffering they are supposedly addressing.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Frequently described as a "high flying former diplomat", Carne Ross resigned from the Foreign Office over the Iraq War. Being so close to mechanisms of power provided him with an understanding which ultimately shook his belief in our national and international systems of government. Indeed the author admits that he does not come up with his arguments `by way of academic study, or historical research. I know this because I once did it'. Ross's earlier work, `Independent Diplomat', was an exorcism of his institutional past while his latest effort is a far more ambitious attempt to outline a better future for global governance.

Ross, now running his own diplomatic consultancy, has transformed into a thinking man's neo-anarchist whose book outlines both the failures of representative democracy in the era of globalisation and ways in which empowered individuals can succeed in the future. The author's central point revolves around the failure of institutions to meet peoples aspirations. While global surveys confirm that while people prefer democracy, as Ross puts it `they are less and less happy with the practice of democratic government'. The nation state represents an archaic and ill fitting answer to multifaceted non-localised issues, brought on by the pressures of globalisation and climate change. From flu-epidemics, to the spread of rioting, he carefully plots the ways in which our interconnectedness has led to problems which require global cooperation to solve. Yet the best efforts at multilateral cooperation have yet to deliver the answers. Ross parallels the enormous rhetoric of the 2005 G8's promise to `make poverty history' with the reality of its `utter failure' to do so with a shortfall in pledges of $20 billion.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback