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The Law of Public Order and Protest Hardcover – 25 Mar 2010


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (25 Mar 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199566143
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199566143
  • Product Dimensions: 24.4 x 3.6 x 17.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,519,106 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

...an excellent book... Practitioners will appreciate the benefits of comprehensive coverage in a single source. (Owen Greenhall, Socialist Lawyer)

You're not a lawyer? Don't worry. You'll find this readable and scholarly volume a topical and fascinating read. If you are a lawyer, run out and buy this book. You never know in this turbulent age of protest and dissent, when you're going to need it.

About the Author

HHJ Peter Thornton QC is a Senior Circuit Judge, sitting at the Central Criminal Court. He was latterly Joint Head of Chambers at Doughty Street, and was a top-ranked criminal silk. He is on the board of the Criminal Law Review and is author of (the now out of print) Public Order Law, was joint editor of The Penguin Civil Liberty Guide, and wrote Decade of Decline: Civil Liberties in the Thatcher Years.

Ruth Brander (call 2001), is a barrister at Doughty Street Chambers. She practices in crime and public law, prisoners' rights, civil actions against the police and inquests. Ruth has a particular interest in the rights of vulnerable, young or mentally disordered defendants and detainees. She also specialises in representing political protesters in domestic criminal trials. She is a contributor to Human Rights in the Investigation and Prosecution of Crime (OUP forthcoming Oct 2009).

Richard Thomas (call 2002), is a criminal barrister at Doughty Street Chambers. Richard practices in all areas of criminal law; as a trial and appellate advocate and in related public law proceedings. As a trial advocate, he has been instructed in cases of fraud and money laundering, attempted murder and other allegations of serious violence, the importation of Class A drugs, and rape and other sexual offences. As a lead junior he has appeared for the defence in cases of murder, substantial multi-million pound banking frauds, and drug importation cases involving international cartels. He is a contributor to Human Rights in the Investigation and Prosecution of Crime (OUP forthcoming Oct 2009).

David Rhodes (call 2002), is a criminal barrister at Doughty Street Chambers. David is a specialist criminal defence advocate. He has a busy practice in the Crown Court as trial counsel alone and as a led junior across the full spectrum of offences including murder, serious violence, kidnapping, blackmail, armed robbery, drugs supply and importation, immigration offences, public disorder and offences of dishonesty. He also has experience of taking cases to the Court of Appeal. He is a contributor to Human Rights in the Investigation and Prosecution of Crime (OUP forthcoming Oct 2009).

Mike Schwarz is a Partner in the Criminal Law team at Bindmans LLP. He has a leading criminal defence practice and his cases frequently include a civil liberties or public order law angle. He advises and trains national campaigning organisations on criminal and public order law, and regularly appears in the specialist and mainstream broadcast media.

Edward Rees QC is a leading criminal law specialist at Doughty Street Chambers. He has appeared in numerous public order and protest cases over many years; ranging from the Bristol St Paul's riot trial, the Orgreave Miners' riot trial and the Broadwater Farm riot trial (R v Silcott) in the 1980's through to the present day and R v Ayliffe (Greenpeace 'Barry Thirteen') in 2005 and R v Olditch and Pritchard (RAF Fairford trespass) in 2007. He is an Honorary Fellow in Criminal Process at the University of Kent. He co-authors the Blackstone's Guide to the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (3rd edition, OUP, March 2008) and contributes annual chapters of Blackstone's Criminal Practice.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Phillip Taylor TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 10 Jun 2010
Format: Hardcover
Length: 1:22 Mins
YOU'RE NOT ALONE, BUT BE WARNED,
THERE MIGHT BE A LAW AGAINST IT.

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

You're not a lawyer? Don't worry. You'll find this readable and scholarly volume by Peter Thornton QC and his team a topical and fascinating read. If you are a lawyer, run out and buy this book. You never know in this turbulent age of protest and dissent, when you're going to need it.

It is an account of public order law; illuminating, informative and carefully structured for ease of use. Public order, as pointed out in the preface, is generally reactive; reacting, or responding to problems of disorder and violent unrest which have recently occurred - the Fascist marches of the1930s, for example...the Southall riots of 1979...the Brixton disorders of 1981...the poll tax of 1990...and so on, including protests over wars, from Viet Nam to Iraq, Afghanistan and Gaza.

Whether you agree or disagree with whatever contentious issue is being protested about, protest nonetheless remains an option, an avenue of communication if you like and in a democratic society, an inalienable right; `the lifeblood of democracy,' a senior judge has called it. Protest of course occurs at the local level too. Usually it's about creeping urban blight, daft planning decisions and perceived threats to health, from everything from big, ugly buildings designed by famous architects, to mobile phone masts, airport expansions, intrusive motorways and a host of other causes.

Since the author wrote Public Order law in 1987, an amazing number of new public order measures have been created, to some considerable extent brought about by the phenomenon of burgeoning terrorism.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
Fond of Protest? 10 Jun 2010
By Phillip Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
YOU'RE NOT ALONE, BUT BE WARNED,
THERE MIGHT BE A LAW AGAINST IT.

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

You're not a lawyer? Don't worry. You'll find this readable and scholarly volume by Peter Thornton QC and his team a topical and fascinating read. If you are a lawyer, run out and buy this book. You never know in this turbulent age of protest and dissent, when you're going to need it.

It is an account of public order law; illuminating, informative and carefully structured for ease of use. Public order, as pointed out in the preface, is generally reactive; reacting, or responding to problems of disorder and violent unrest which have recently occurred - the Fascist marches of the1930s, for example...the Southall riots of 1979...the Brixton disorders of 1981...the poll tax of 1990...and so on, including protests over wars, from Viet Nam to Iraq, Afghanistan and Gaza.

Whether you agree or disagree with whatever contentious issue is being protested about, protest nonetheless remains an option, an avenue of communication if you like and in a democratic society, an inalienable right; `the lifeblood of democracy,' a senior judge has called it. Protest of course occurs at the local level too. Usually it's about creeping urban blight, daft planning decisions and perceived threats to health, from everything from big, ugly buildings designed by famous architects, to mobile phone masts, airport expansions, intrusive motorways and a host of other causes.

Since the author wrote Public Order law in 1987, an amazing number of new public order measures have been created, to some considerable extent brought about by the phenomenon of burgeoning terrorism. `There is a trend, driven by political will,' warns the author, '...to keep making more law without codification, of apparent thought for the adequacy of existing powers. `The primary aim of this book -- which it accomplishes admirably -- is 'to guide the lawyer student and citizen through the maze.' And a maze it certainly is, although note that the January 2010 publication date of the book precedes the UK general election of May 6th 2010. The new Conservative-Lib Dem coalition now in power will no doubt review much of this legislation. Watch out for changes here in response to continuing events.

Areas covered by this important book's expert team include: the Public Order Act 1986...Processions, Assemblies and Meetings...Use of the Highway...Trespass to Land...Police Powers Before Arrest...Arrest, Detention and Bail...Defences of Excuse and Justification...Punishment, Appeals and Restricting Orders...and Human Rights. In all, you have the benefit of over 500 useful pages, including Tables of Cases, Statutes...Secondary Legislation and International Legislation - the resources you need to guide you through this fascinating and complex area of law.
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