Start reading The Law on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
The Law
 
 

The Law [Kindle Edition]

Frederick Bastiat
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Print List Price: £4.50
Kindle Price: £0.77 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: £3.73 (83%)
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Whispersync for Voice

Now you can switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible audiobook. Learn more or scan your Kindle library to find matching professional narration for the Kindle books you already own.

Add the professional narration of The Law for a reduced price of £2.99 after you buy this Kindle book.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £0.77  
Paperback £4.81  
Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deal: At least 60% off
Each day we unveil a new book deal at a specially discounted price--for that day only. Learn more about the Kindle Daily Deal or sign up for the Kindle Daily Deal Newsletter to receive free e-mail notifications about each day's deal.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Purchase any Kindle Book sold by Amazon.co.uk and receive £1 credit to try out our Digital Music Store. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)


Product Description

Product Description

This book has been specifically formated for the Amazon Kindle.

The Law, first published as a pamphlet in June, 1850. Frederic Bastiat (1801-1850) was a French economist, statesman, and author. He did most of his writing during the years just before - and immediately following -- the Revolution of February 1848. The same socialist-communist ideas and plans that were then adopted in France are now sweeping America. The explanations and arguments then advanced against socialism by Mr. Bastiat are -- word for word -- equally valid today. His ideas deserve a serious hearing.

About the Author

Frederic Bastiat was born in Bayonne, Aquitaine, France. When he was nine years old, he was orphaned and became a ward of his father's parents. At age seventeen he left school to become more involved with his family's business as an exporter. Economist Thomas DiLorenzo suggests that this family business experience was crucial to Bastiat's later work because it allowed young Frédéric to acquire first-hand knowledge of some of the effects of trade regulations on the market. Sheldon Richman notes that "he came of age during the Napoleonic wars, with their extensive government intervention in economic affairs." When Bastiat was twenty-five, his grandfather and benefactor died, leaving the young man the family estate and providing him with the means to further his own theoretical inquiries. His areas of intellectual interest were diverse, including "philosophy, history, politics, religion, travel, poetry, political economy, [and] biography." His public career as an economist began only in 1844, and was cut short by his untimely death in 1850. Bastiat had contracted tuberculosis, probably during his tours throughout France to promote his ideas, and that illness eventually prevented him from making further speeches (particularly at the legislative assembly to which he was elected in 1848 and 1849) and took his life. Bastiat died in Rome on 24 December 1850.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 94 KB
  • Print Length: 60 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1419168878
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Misbach Enterprises (1 Jun 2008)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B001B5VPXY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #239,802 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This quote sums it up:
Life, faculties, production--in other words, individuality, liberty, property -- this is man. And in spite of the cunning of artful political leaders, these three gifts from God precede all human legislation, and are superior to it
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  102 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book but Kindle formatting is inconsistent 6 Mar 2011
By Neil Chilson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I read this short book in a single sitting. Originally published in 1850, "The Law" is a surprisingly current analysis of the role of law in human society, and of the causation and negative effects of expanding the law beyond its proper role. It is a very succinct and punchy argument for the importance of liberty.

One note: Bastiat quotes at some length from contemporaries. The Kindle edition formats these quotes inconsistently, sometimes italicizing and sometimes not. Due to this inconsistency, I occasionally found it difficult to distinguish the quotes from Bastiat's own writing.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Read! 30 Jan 2011
By ohio mom - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
this publication is applicable now as much as it was when it was originally written. I recommend everyone read this regardless of your political affliciation. It's well written, easy to understand and gives a sound arguement.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Never wrote an internet review in my life. 25 Dec 2009
By Luke Orem - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This book was absolutely amazing. I read it now, as a 27 year old military veteran trying to make sense of what is going on in the free market and I see we don't even have a free market. I get introduced to a couple crazy ideas about history predicting the mess we are in and I find things like "War is a Racket" and "The law" and I have to sit back and be amazed about how it took me 27 years to really look at how we got to where we are. So much wasted time thinking obscure thoughts for entertainment purposes. Thankfully things like that have stood the test of time for new generations to latch on to.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Economic book 17 Mar 2012
By Steve - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I read the "Communist Manifesto" recently that a friend lent to me. I learned a lot about communism from reading it. It made me even more glad that I am not a communist.

This same friend also lent me the book "The Law." After reading it, I decided to purchase it for reference. The book is about economic theory from a legal standpoint. I agree with the author's viewpoint to a great extent. It is a different way to explain capitalism.

I liked this book a lot. I highly recommend to others.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The law should protect our liberty 20 July 2011
By Allen Honeycutt - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
It is disturbing that in my public education I was not introduced to Mr. Bastiat's classic masterpiece. His perception of liberty parallels the great men that founded our great nation. Required reading for all Americans!
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Popular Highlights

 (What's this?)
&quote;
But how is this legal plunder to be identified? Quite simply. See if the law takes from some persons what belongs to them, and gives it to other persons to whom it does not belong. See if the law benefits one citizen at the expense of another by doing what the citizen himself cannot do without committing a crime. &quote;
Highlighted by 613 Kindle users
&quote;
When law and morality contradict each other, the citizen has the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense or losing his respect for the law. &quote;
Highlighted by 513 Kindle users
&quote;
The law has been perverted by the influence of two entirely different causes: stupid greed and false philanthropy. &quote;
Highlighted by 456 Kindle users

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   



Look for similar items by category