Last Of The Just and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£1.53
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by reusabook
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Product dispatched in UK within 48 hours. Thanks.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Last of the Just Paperback – 23 Mar 2000


See all 30 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 23 Mar 2000
£1.53
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£5.99
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product details

  • Paperback: 374 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Putnam Inc; New edition edition (23 Mar. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585670162
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585670161
  • Product Dimensions: 13.9 x 2.6 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,157,202 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"Has the inspiration, the strength and the poetic feeling to make it unique." Sunday Times

From the Back Cover

In every generation, according to Jewish tradition, thirty-six just men, the Lamed-waf, are born to take the burden of the world's suffering upon themselves. At York in 1185 the just man was Rabbi Yom Tov Levey, whose sacrifice so touched God that he gave his descendants one just man each generation, all the way down to Ernie Levey, the last of the just, killed at Auschwitz in 1943. This, then, is the story of Ernie Levey. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 April 1997
Format: Hardcover
There is a Jewish legend that there is a line of just men. This novel chronicles the tragic demise of the last of those just men (hence the title) at the hands of the Nazis. The story is thick with struggle and triumph, good and evil, joy and misery, but is never maudlin or melodramatic. Schwartz-Bart's words are like brush strokes in a painting, creating a cinematic cast, landscape, and sweeping emotion. In addition to being a gripping intrapsychic read, the book is an excellent individual-level history of the Holocaust--though fiction, it is remarkably true to reality and detail.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Paul Harris on 18 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback
Powerful and moving. The journey through the generations is exhilirating. The outcome just heartbreaking. A beautiful book you will remember.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Blumenau TOP 500 REVIEWER on 9 Dec. 2006
Format: Paperback
In this classic of 1959 André Schwarz-Bart reworks the Jewish legend of the Lamed Vavs, the handful (36 in most versions of the story) of Just or Righteous Men who live among the Jews in every generation and who provide the merit on which the world depends. The tradition dates back to the 5th century Babylonian Talmud. It was elaborated by kabbalistic Jews in the 16th and 17th century and by hasidic Jews in the 18th century: the Lamed Vavs are humble men and unnoticed as special by their fellow Jews. At times of great peril, so this version has it, "a Lamed Vavnik makes a dramatic appearance, using his hidden powers to defeat the enemies of Israel" (Encyclopedia Judaica).

Schwarz-Bart was born in France and lost most of the members of his family in the Holocaust. His will not have been the first persecuted Jew in history to question whether any Lamed Vav has ever arisen to defeat the enemies of Israel. He retains the idea that he will be humble and unknown, but he totally subverts the idea that he can be a saviour. Instead his role is to offer to God his own martyrdom for his faith and for his people.

Schwarz-Bart imagines the story of the Levys, one family in which the role of the Just Man was hereditary. They have suffered death down the ages, beginning with the massacre of the Jews of York in 1185. In later generations this wandering Jewish family suffers at the hands of the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions; they are expelled from one area after another; the Cossacks add their contribution; and when we come to the late 19th century, the family leaves its home in Zemyock in Russian Poland and settles in Germany.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback