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The Last Dive (Thorndike Adventure) Hardcover – Large Print, May 2001

13 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 601 pages
  • Publisher: Thorndike Press; Lrg edition (May 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786233060
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786233069
  • Product Dimensions: 22.3 x 14.6 x 3.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,301,284 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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First Sentence
THE WIND MOUNTED STEADILY throughout the night as Chris Rouse, cocooned in his sleeping bag, braced himself against the side of his bunk. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 31 May 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read a few books on scuba diving and alot get really stuck with technique. this book is good for divers - you can feel that you are there ---- and non divers - explained enough to not bore, gripping enough to hold you.
found that there was alot of repetition but not too much, hence the 4 stars... really overall 5 star
if you dive get this book..... if you don't but your partner/friend does buy it to read or as a guaranteed A1 present.
scares the hell out of any person... gives a real choking feeling at times and you really get close to the people in the book
you will learn alot about diving
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 Oct. 2003
Format: Paperback
A great book that appeals not just to divers, but to anyone with in interest in the dreams and fascinations, of ordinary people testing their limits to the ultimate extremes, diving in that great unknown place "Inner Space"
This is the story of a father and son that we would all have liked to have had as friends and a stark reminder that we are all mortal, and to be aware of the dangers in this great sport.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Barry Smith on 9 Sept. 2005
Format: Paperback
This book tells the fascinating and fateful story of Chris Rouse and his son Chrissy from their discovery of scuba diving through to their tragic accident whilst trying to identify a mystery U-boat in the deep atlantic. Their story is interwoven with a fascinating insight into the world of technical diving - a persuit which relates to recreational scuba much as climbing Mount Everest relates to some gentle hill walking.
The descriptions of technical diving are kept simple enough for the non-diver to understand and yet contain enough detail that certified scuba divers will learn much about a world which basic open water courses dare not mention.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Scuba Lou on 4 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback
I read this book after reading Shadow Divers by Robert Kurson (an INCREDIBLE book by the way...) and I am not at all happy with the outcome, despite its rave reviews. Though I am sure that Bernie Chowdury has some excellent stories to tell, I feel he should have used somebody else to write them (perhaps Robert Kurson).

I read the book because the relationship that Chris and Chrissy Rouse had was of interest to me and I wanted to learn more about them, and the development of their skills and adventures. The ratio of details to do with the Rouses and details to boost Chowdhury's ego when it comes to his own set of diving skills is not what I was hoping it would be. One page of the book is spent describing how Chowdhury decompression time is spent in fear of a Jellyfish stinging him on the lip. Aside from disrespectful and patronising I find the book dull.

I know it has been described as a "must read" - and part of me thinks it is, if only to get an opinion on it and see what you think.

I think that it was foolish to think that he was capable of writing such an important story, and why it has been published in so many different languages (as his facebook profile pictures modestly communicate) is beyond me.

Any feedback welcome...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Lovethang on 25 July 2006
Format: Paperback
Overall a very interesting read into the world of deep/cave diving. Would have been nice if the author had not felt the need to explain the 24 hour clock to me twice in as many pages - apparantly, 13:48 means 1:48 in the afternoon !!! Also didn't need to know how many languages his gran can speak. Apart from that a good read when he managed to stay focused on the subject at hand - deep wreck/cave diving and the inherent risks involved. Preferred Shadow Divers, and would like to know which of the differing accounts of what happened on the dive deck of the Seeker were nearest the truth regarding the Chatterton/Coast Guard exchanges.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Without taking anything away from Chowdhury's expertise and experiences as diver, (he has reached levels most of us will never get near) the book for me drags and is a quite frustrating read at times.

The crux of the book is sold as the fatal last dive of the Rouses. However, the book is far too long and drawn out for the content. Chowdhury doesn't reach the fatal dive until almost the last chapter and then it is scimmed over quickly. Hence the most dramatic aspect of the book is over very quickly leaving you, (without sounding morbid), feeling somewhat sort changed. Maybe it was out of respect for the dead but why write a book advertised around their fatal last dive and then barely touch the subject? Chowdbury would have been better writing a magazine article if he had wanted to focus on just that fateful dive-keeping it short and too the point. Or advertise his book as an exploration into the diving community and it experimentation in new techniques during the late 80's early 90's. He simply doesn't have enough material and your left with pages and pages of rather boring fleshing out. It may as well be an autobiography on both himself and the Rouse's which is interesting at times but is not why I bought the book.

As another reviewer mentioned there is so much irrelevant information and bizarre tangents in an attempt to flesh out the book. I'm reading a book on diving I don't wish to know about his fathers career as a scientist etc. The are huge areas of repetition on dive tables, gas effects under pressure, how decompression sickness occurs, once I've read it once I've got it, I became frustrated when such information appears again and again and goes on for pages. I landed up skipping through huge chunks as I'd read it all before in the previous chapter.
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