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The King's Speech: Based on the Recently Discovered Diaries of Lionel Logue [Kindle Edition]

Mark Logue , Peter Conradi
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (132 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Lionel Logue was a self-taught and almost unknown Australian speech therapist. Yet it was this outgoing, amiable man who almost single-handedly turned the nervous, tongue-tied Duke of York into one of Britain's greatest kings after his brother, Edward VIII, abdicated in 1936 over his love for Mrs Simpson.

The King's Speech is the previously untold story of the remarkable relationship between Logue and the haunted future King George VI, written with Logue's grandson and drawing exclusively from his grandfather Lionel's diaries and archive.

This is an astonishing insight into the House of Windsor at the time of its greatest crisis. Never before has there been such a portrait of the British monarchy seen through the eyes of an Australian commoner who was proud to serve, and save, his King.


Product Description

From the Back Cover

One man saved the British Royal Family in the first decades of the 20th century - he wasn't a prime minister or an archibishop of Canterbury. He was an almost unknown, and self-taught, speech therapist named Lionel Logue, whom one newspaper in the 1930s famously dubbed 'The Quack who saved a King'. Logue wasn't a British aristocrat or even an Englishman - he was a commoner and an Australian to boot. Nevertheless it was the outgoing, amiable Logue who single-handedly turned the nervous, tongue-tied Duke of York into one of Britain's greatest kings after his brother, Edward VIII, abdicated in 1936 over his love of Mrs Simpson. This is the previously untold story of the remarkable relationship between Logue and the haunted future King George VI, written with Logue's grandson and drawing exclusively from his grandfather Lionel's diaries and archive. It throws an extraordinary light on the intimacy of the two men, and the vital role the King's wife, the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, played in bringing them together to save her husband's reputation and reign. The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy is an astonishing insight into a private world. Logue's diaries also reveal, for the first time, the torment the future King suffered at the hands of his father George V because of his stammer. Never before has there been such a personal portrait of the British monarchy - at a time of its greatest crisis - seen through the eyes of an Australian commoner who was proud to serve, and save, his King.

About the Author

Mark Logue is the grandson of Lionel Logue. He is a film maker and the custodian of the Logue Archive. He lives in London. Peter Conradi is an author and journalist. He works for the Sunday Times and his last book was Hitler's Piano Player: The Rise and fall of Ernst Hanfstaengl.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1673 KB
  • Print Length: 273 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0857381105
  • Publisher: Quercus (25 Nov. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004I6DDG0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (132 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #84,616 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
62 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The full story 18 Jan. 2011
By Mickey
Format:Paperback
I loved the film so when I saw there was a book as well I was intrigued. This tells the full story of Lionel Logue and his friendship with the Duke of York/King George VI, from the birth to death of both men. There's lots of fascinating historical and personal details and the book complements the film really well. The Lionel Logue who emerges is quite a different character to the one portrayed by Geoffrey Rush, and the book reinforces what a special story this is. If you enjoyed the film I recommend this book.
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118 of 126 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "How one Man Saved the Monarchy"... 28 Nov. 2010
By Jill Meyer TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
In lieu of being able to watch the movie "The King's Speech" because it hasn't been released yet, I ordered the book by the same name, written by Lionel Logue's grandson, Mark Logue, and his co-author, Peter Conradi. The book is a well-written biography of Australian-born speech therapist Lionel Logue and his work with Britain's Prince Albert when he was Duke of York in the 1920's and continuing on in the 1930's when "Bertie" became King - George VI - in 1936, and then afterward during WW2.

Albert, son of King George V and younger brother of Edward VIII, had developed a stammer during his youth, which made him shy and uncommunicative. As someone who has struggled all my life with a relatively mild stutter, I thought it was good that Mark Logue did not attribute the cause of Bertie's stammer to any one thing. Stuttering is an impediment which seems to arise from both/either physical and psychological reasons and most of the time cannot be properly ascribed to any one thing. In Bertie's case, it was possibly from a difficult youth. He and his siblings were not close to their parents - as was common in those days - and his parents seemed to rather scare him when they were together. A sadistic nanny and the changing of his left-handedness to right may have contributed to his stutter. In any case, he was a man who could not always control his own speech, and he was moving into some situations where he would be called on to speak publicly and to do so often.

After his marriage, Bertie consulted Lionel Logue who had emigrated to England from Australia with his wife and young family and set up a practice in speech therapy in London's Harley Street.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well done! 1 Feb. 2011
By Kew
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I love history so really enjoyed reading this account. It is written by Lionel Logue's grandson, Mark. He has access to hundreds of letters, diary entries, photographs and newspaper clippings which Lionel Logue had collected throughout his career - as well as access to family memories. This makes the book a very accurate and personal account. You will not find out details of how Logue treated the king however, as he never wrote up the case; nor did he set out his methods for curing speech impediments in a formal way or have an apprentice to pass the information on to. I found this information in the introduction which is very interesting and informative, explaining what records the author already had at his disposal, how he found yet more records, but also what is missing. I would also like to praise the formating of the kindle version! It shows how well these books can work on the kindle if the publisher sets it out properly. There are several black and white photos included - which work very well on the kindle, and live links to the references, as well as an index. This is a personal account which tells a lot about the relationship between Logue and his pupil, King George VI.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Kings Speech 22 Jun. 2011
By Max VINE VOICE
Format:Audio CD|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
It may be helpful to have seen the Colin Firth film or to have read the book as this radio play starts right after the coronation of the King George V with not much preamble..

It has 45 minutes to fill the listener in on the background detail and maybe that is why the King has a rather revealing conversation with Lionel Logue as he tells him about his relationship with his father. On the other hand Logue was a close confidante of the King's for over 11 years, seeing him at his most frustrated and embarrassed and coaxing him into doing, quite well on the whole, what was anathema to him, public speaking and broadcasting.

I found it rather touching and thought Alex Jennings was very good as the king and Trevor Littledale gave good support as Logue.

I also found the ending quite sad as they ponder on what the future would be for George's beloved elder daughter who he never wished to see put into the position she would inherit. He just wanted a quiet family life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Short but Powerful 29 July 2011
By John Ferngrove TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
My wife's review:

At the time I ordered this CD I had not seen the film of the same title, so the whole story was new to me. I knew that King George V had a speech impediment and that he was not at all keen on public speaking, but that was all. This CD, which is taken from a radio play, briefly tells the story of the King's speech tuition and the broadcast on National Radio of his speech at the beginning of the Second World War. It portrays the frustration the King went through because he wanted to get it right. I enjoyed it and found it educational as well as entertaining, but one criticism is that it is too short. I think people would feel they had their money's worth more if perhaps it had been included in a series of radio plays, rather than on its own and at a time when the film was being shown at cinemas and people may have expected a more detailed story.
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