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The King's Daughter (Rose of York) Paperback – 2 Dec 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 401 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley Publishing Group; 1 edition (2 Dec. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 042522144X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425221440
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.2 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 243,755 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sandra Worth is the award-winning author of six novels chronicling the demise of the Plantagenet dynasty in England and the rise of the Tudors. She is internationally published and her books have won numerous awards and prizes, including three Reviewers' Choice Awards and a Francis Ford Coppola-Ray Bradbury-Moxie Films sponsored prize. For more information visit her website at www.sandraworth.com

Product Description

Seventeen-year-old Elizabeth of York trusts that her beloved father?s dying wish has left England in the hands of a just and deserving ruler. But upon the rise of Richard of Gloucester, Elizabeth?s family experiences one devastation after another: her late father is exposed as a bigamist, she and her siblings are branded bastards, and her brothers are taken into the new king?s custody, then reportedly killed. But one fateful night leads Elizabeth to question her prejudices. Through the eyes of Richard's ailing queen she sees a man worthy of respect and undying adoration. His dedication to his people inspires a forbidden love and ultimately gives her the courage to accept her destiny, marry Henry Tudor, and become Queen. While her soul may secretly belong to another, her heart belongs to England?

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Christina M. Croft on 10 April 2009
Format: Paperback
This book is engaging from beginning to end and goes against all the pre-conceived notions of a 'weak and feeble woman' who simply went along with the events of her age. Elizabeth's plight and gradual understanding of what was happening around her, is so vividly portrayed, and the horrendous manipulation of those around her is astounding.
How lovely it is to see a very real character brought alive again in these pages!

I didn't sense 'eek' at all...rather a sense of this character, who is so lost in the annals of history. As someone who had lived most of my life on the border between Lancashire and Yorkshire, and often passed the Tudor Rose on the M62, it was truly eye-opening to realize that most history is presented from the side of the 'conquerer' Henry, and to have an understanding of Elizabeth is very lovely. I really enjoyed this book!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kat73 on 15 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been reading different historical novles from a variety of writers about the The War of the Roses and the Yorkist and Tudor courts. I never write reviews since I find most of them quite accurate and useful, but this time I felt I had to. This book is by far the one that lacks most credibility. More like a total fiction book than a historical novel. To begin with, the relationship between Elizabeth and her father, King Edward IV. The author tries to portray a warm and loving relationship father-daughter that one can dream of, but which is absolutely difficult to transpose to the story. Firstly because of the well known personality of King Edward IV (great warrior also known for his tendency to excesses and lechery)and secondly, for a time where female children were considered useless and only male heirs were valid.
The familiarity of the dialogues and the hideous nick names were unbearable for me, especially at the beginning of the book (the author transforms them gradually towards the second half of the story). Elizabeth Wydeville is awkwardly portrayed as a witch in a part that gives the feeling to had been added up in a hurry once the book was finished.
Similar feeling about the two romances in Elizabeth's life: the author precipitates into them out of nothing. Especially the romance with King Richard. Instead of accepting the implicit cheating and its incestous nature, she strives uselessly for presenting it the purest way possible that finds its climax in a familiar cheek to cheek embrace whose impact lasts forever!!!
The evil ones are too evil, the good ones are almost saints...and at the end you keep quite a pathetic portrait of Elizabeth of York. Skimmed a good deal of the pages, especially the endless descriptions.
Really hoping Philippa Gregory or at least A. Weir write a more accurate account about this queen that is indeed, poorly known.
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42 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Devaki Khanna on 14 Dec. 2008
Format: Paperback
When I finished Fall from Grace, I wondered how a gentle, sensitive and idealistic young woman, such as Elizabeth of York, could possibly have endured a marriage with Henry VII, who was cruel, avaricious and suspicious. Moreover, this was the man who was responsible for instigating the murder of her brothers, not to speak of the doing to death of her uncle on Bosworth Field. The King's Daughter shows how Elizabeth coped in this impossible marriage, which not only included Henry but his mother, Margaret Beaufort (the ma-in-law from hell). She is, of course, coerced into this marriage by her mother and Lady Beaufort, and she shows her good sense by NOT trying to rule her busband. She realises that Henry is suspicious by nature and vindictive--he can never forget that her aunt, Margaret of Burgundy, has funded all the rebellions against him. She does what she can for her people, following the example set by her aunt, Richard's Queen, Anne, and focuses on her sisters and children. She manages to create a refuge for Henry in her household, but she cannot really change his nature--as he kills off one set of enemies (Perkin Warbeck and Edward of Warwick), he begins to worry about every other family member. Elizabeth's reliance on prayer sustains her, as does the love of her people, her siblings, her subordinates and her children, through a difficult marriage.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. A. Wright VINE VOICE on 28 Mar. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I loved this book. It is the story of Elizabeth the daughter of Edward 1V and extends from Edwards reign through Richard111's to the later years of Henry V11's reign. I have read little about Elizabeth of York or indeed Henry V11 so I was soon immersed in it. Clearly the author is pro Richard 111 so this was a bonus for me but nevertheless she raises pertinent points that Richard was not as bad as is believed. She deals with the mystery of the two princes exceptionally well.At times I wanted to weep with Elizabeth and often felt anger at the true frustration she must have felt. Ms Worth writes well and knows how to draw the reader into the story. I would have no hesitation in recommending this book to anyone who enjoys history. It's easy to read style means it can be read anywhere and the author's point of view is well argued.
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I have given this book four rather than five stars because one of the most important characters was left out. Margaret Pole, nee Princess Margaret of Clarence, sister to Edward of Warwick. Margaret Pole was missed out when Richard was still on the throne, nor does she get a mention at all when Henry VII is on the throne. I thought she was Elizabeth of York's confident during her difficult years married to King Henry. But it seems in this historical novel, her younger sister Kate fulfils that role instead.

Having said that, the book was good, well written and sympathetic towards Elizabeth's position as King Henry's queen, but playing second fiddle to Henry's mother Margaret Beaufort. Fortunately, it seems she is not around so much later in their marriage.

The novel begins when Elizabeth's father, Edward IV, is still on the throne and she has a close relationship with him.

She also has to endure sanctuary after her father is temporarily deposed and in exile when she is five years old and then later after her father's death. She has a love hate relationship with her mother Elizabeth Woodville who desires money and power above love while Elizabeth yearns affection and she finds it with a man called Thomas Stafford while in sanctuary for the second time. At first it seems she is in love with him but once out of sanctuary, she falls for her uncle Richard, now king while Thomas is up north, helping to prevent more invasions from the Scots.

The novel describes the threats to Henry VII's throne and Elizabeth is torn between her Yorkist past and protecting her beloved son's future as King of England.She tries to raise him to become a just ruler for her people in the tradition of the Plantagenet kings which died with King Edward IV and Richard III.
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