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The Killables (Killables Trilogy 1) Paperback – 11 Oct 2012

46 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

The Killables (Killables Trilogy 1) + The Disappearances (Killables Trilogy 2) + The System (The Killables Book Three)
Price For All Three: £19.37

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Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks (11 Oct. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1444722808
  • ISBN-13: 978-1444722802
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 2.5 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 296,445 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Gemma Malley is an award-winning author. She lives in London with her husband and three young children. You can visit her online at www.gemmamalley.com.

Product Description

Review

Chillingly well-imagined. (Daily Mail)

Malley creates a harrowing dystopian world that keeps you turning the pages. (We Love This Book)

'. . . like a roller coaster of adventure . . . The Killables is a very interesting book, dealing with our perceptions of what is evil, and whether it is possible to turn someone completely evil or completely good. The concept of the novel regarding the control of evil is fascinating . . . It is safe to say that Malley has a talent for writing dystopian novels and I am looking forward to the next installment in this highly fast-paced trilogy.' (Guardian Online)

I love Gemma Malley . . . Somehow, she manages to produce books that are at once intellectual, challenging, sophisticated, exciting, romantic and accessible. (Thebookbag.co.uk)

At times I felt I couldn't put this down, there were times where the action was riveting and others I just wanted to read on to find out the truth about the system . . . Malley has done an excellent job and it is well worth a read. (Passionfornovels.co.uk)

A great deal of thought and planning has clearly gone into the world building. I believed it, could see it happening and found it disturbing and fascinating at the same time . . . The denouement was particularly satisfying. The System is organised on a computer and I loved the part that this took in the plot and its ending. Although this is the first in the series I was happy with the conclusion of book one, it satisfied my need for revenge although there are plenty of untied ends and interesting threads for the rest of the series. (Myfavouritebooks.blogspot.co.uk)

'Malley is an exceptional story-teller who knows how to keep the story flowing and exciting... The Killables will give readers an insatiable appetite for Malley's characters who are fraught with flaws and realistic mentalities. This dystopian novel has a touch of science fiction and survival elements that longtime fans of Malley will surely appreciate!' (www.loveydoveybooks.blogspot.co.uk)

Praise for Gemma Malley's previous books (:)

The Declaration is a chilling, dystopian view of how life may be in the not too far off future, reminiscent of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and PD James's The Children of Men, but written for a young teenage audience . . . ground-breaking, mesmerizing and compelling novel. (www.lovereading.co.uk)

Stunning, thought-provoking and a book that genuinely stays with you. (The Bookseller)

Book Description

Groundbreaking, powerful and gripping storytelling set in a future dystopian state from the highly acclaimed author Gemma Malley.


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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By I Read, Therefore I Blog VINE VOICE on 29 Mar. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
After the world's ravaged by The Horrors, a neurological surgical procedure is developed to abolish evil. The procedure is mandatory for all who live in the City, its citizens then being labelled according to their level of goodness. The A's are the best, the Ds the worst. The most deviant are labelled K, who are taken away for a procedure called the New Baptism and are never heard from again.

16-year-old Evie works for the government, changing people's labels according to what the System dictates. She's engaged to Lucas, an A label, high ranking civil servant 12 years older than her who keeps the System running. But Evie loves his brother, Raffy, who's known to have deviant tendencies. When she discovers that Raffy will be redesignated as a K, they have to escape but doing so uncovers secrets that the City will kill to protect ...

Gemma Malley's YA dystopia, the first in a trilogy, is a disappointing tale that does little new with the genre and revolves around two unlikeable characters.

Evie's a passive character who needs to be told what to do - even her escape from the City is engineered for her. Though explainable in the context of the world she lives in, it made for frustrating reading, as she persistently refuses to stand up for herself. The potentially interesting relationship with her mother - particularly Evie's guilt at being such a disappointment - doesn't really go anywhere, with her mother's hostility getting a trite explanation.

The love triangle is dull and a little icky given the age difference between Evie and Lucas and the fact that Raffy behaves like a petulant, possessive toddler.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Paul Tapner TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 3 Mar. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
A young adult dystopian science fiction novel. It runs for three hundred and seventy two pages, and is divided into twenty four chapters plus an epilogue. And a short piece at the beginning.

It's the start of a trilogy.

Recommended reading age would be thirteen and up, thanks to some mild violence and some adult themes and references.

It's good enough to be enjoyed by older readers as well, though.

The piece at the front tells us about the Amygdala. A part of the brain that some claim can have an effect on mental states.

The book then introduces us to Evie. Teenage girl and viewpoint character for nearly all the chapters. She has strange dreams about being brought to a place of safety by a man. She lives in the city. A place where humanity flourishes in a post disaster world. Where the great leader of the city and his assistant the brother claim that's because they deal with the amygdala. And by doing that they stop people being as evil as those who brought about the fall of civilisation were.

Citizens are graded from A to D, depending on how good a citizen they are. Anyone who falls lower than that is a K. But people don't talk about them.

A grade A citizen is Lucas, whom Evie is betrothed to. Evie has a job in government and has been brought up to be a model citizen and not to question anything about her society.

But she's torn between what is expected of her and what she wants for herself. As a result of which, she's caught up in events that will lead to the secrets of the city coming to light...

This takes it's time to set up the scenario and the world in which Evie lives. And once you get used to it, which happens very quickly, it becomes a pretty intriguing read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Molly Looby on 10 April 2014
Format: Paperback
Before we begin, this is first of my book reviews. I will write a review every time I finish a book. If you want to see what I’m reading right now or any book I’ve already read this year, please look to the right-hand side of the screen where there is a book list. There are however, no other book reviews, as this is the first. I’d also like to just mention that every time I use an example I have found them in the novel – in this case ‘The Killables’ by Gemma Malley.

A Spoiler Free Bit About the Book

This morning I finished Gemma Malley’s ‘The Killables’, a teenage fiction novel set in dystopian London which is called the City which is run by the Brother. In the City evil has been eradicated by the removal of the amygdala – the part of the brain the people of the City believe evil lives – in a procedure called the New Baptism. Everyone has a label from A to D which indicates your ‘goodness’ level, I suppose. ‘A’ being that there is no evil in you whatsoever and ‘D’ being ‘deviant’ or one to watch. The D’s are despised by others in their community and suspected of evil. If worse comes to worse and the System believes your amygdala is growing back and you have the capacity for evil you are labelled a ‘K’. The K’s are sent off to be reconditioned and have a second New Baptism. But the K’s are never seen again.

The novel follows a teenager called Evie. I believe she’s sixteen or seventeen. She works for the System changing people’s labels. Evie believes that she may have the capacity for evil as the world she lives in has made her anxious and timid (or that’s how I read into it). Evie worries that she isn’t like everyone else (as we all do at some point in our lives).
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