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The Kill: (Maeve Kerrigan 5) Hardcover – 5 Jun 2014

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Press (Fiction) (5 Jun. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091949688
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091949686
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 4 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 410,379 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

"All my criminal elements have some basis in reality, no matter how awful they may be. Nothing is completely farfetched." Jane Casey

Crime is a family affair for Jane Casey. Married to a criminal barrister, she has a unique insight into the brutal underbelly of urban life, from the smell of a police cell to the darkest motives of a serial killer.

This gritty realism has made her books international bestsellers and critical successes; while D.C. Maeve Kerrigan has quickly become one of the most popular characters in crime fiction.

Twice shortlisted for the Irish Crime Novel of the Year Award as well as the Mary Higgins Clark Award, Jane has been recently longlisted for the CWA Dagger in the Library Award.

Product Description

Review

"one of the most charming protagonists in contemporary crime fiction" (Irish Times)

Book Description

The latest explosive Maeve Kerrigan thriller

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The Kill, by Jane Casey, is classic crime fiction. It features troubled cops with messy personal lives trying to solve difficult cases involving multiple murders, in this case of police officers in London. There is sexism, relationship breakdown and corruption within the force. The protagonist, Maeve Kerrigan, is a beautiful young detective who must overcome stereotypical prejudices. Her colleague, Josh Derwent, is physically strong and outwardly unpleasant but with a soft side that is rarely acknowledged. Alongside this pair we have the respected, older cop with secrets to hide and the career minded woman who nobody seems to like. It is the typical team of characters that works well for fans of the genre.

Maeve Kerrigan is shown to be strong in so many ways: putting up with the running commentary of sexist remarks from colleagues; gaining the upper hand when cornered by a group of young thugs; successfully fighting back when attacked by a desperate suspect. It is a shame that she has less success in fighting back the tears at inopportune moments whilst at work, a problem which none of her male colleagues appears to have.

Josh Derwent displays a serious attitude problem towards women as well as an apparent inability to control his temper in public. Neither of these attributes would suggest that he could become a good upholder of law and order. As the author is reported to have a ‘unique insight’ into crime fighting and to incorporate ‘gritty realism’ into her stories I do feel some concern about the make up of our police force. I hope that she took plenty of artistic licence in developing her team of characters.

The plot is compelling and the writing flows effortlessly until about three quarters of the way through the book.
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By J. Mcdonald TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 July 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I first encountered Maeve Kerrigan in "The Reckoning", book 2 in the series. Although I enjoyed that novel I didn`t follow up on it so I approached this as part re-introduction and part stand-alone novel.

I was initially disappointed with it; there was a long wedding-scene preamble, presumably connecting threads from the previous books and re-establishing the characters - though the sexist, boorish Josh Derwent isn`t someone a reader is likely to forget...
Once the case begins however, it soon settles down into a fairly absorbing police procedural.
The characterisations are clearly well-established and there's a good deal of entertainment in the banter between the chalk-and-cheese pairing of Kerrigan and Derwent and their unit colleagues. Derwent`s attitudes are fairly exaggerated, but its in the nature of this approach that authors occasionally ask the reader to suspend their disbelief. Given that rule, it works well.
As a stand-alone novel, it didn't in my view present any problems for the uninitiated; back-story elements are mentioned, some with recap/explanations to suit the point in the narrative; this far into the series one would expect a lot of potentially obscure references, but Casey seems to have considered this; it remains a functional thriller without any need to know anything of the previous episodes.
That is not to say, however, that readers won`t wish to acquaint themselves with the other books - that is now the case with me.

I enjoyed this book as a quick, diverting read and am of the opinion that I've missed out on a good series here; I am happy to commend this on its own merits but I'll necessarily have to leave it to other reviewers who have been following the series to offer a verdict on it as the latest episode.
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By Quiverbow TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 29 Jun. 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Not everyone likes police officers. Some people don't because of something that may have happened to them that involved the `boys in blue', whilst others dislike of them simply because they don't like authority and think they should be allowed to do what the hell they like. There are even some people out there who hate the police to such an extent that one less copper is something to be celebrated. When two people out badger watching in Richmond Park in the early hours hear what sounds like two gunshots, whomever has cause to celebrate found a reason to open another bottle.

This is the fifth novel to involve Detective Constable Maeve Kerrigan, but only the second I've read, and I'm pleased to see that DI Josh Derwent is still her boss and, even though Kerrigan does fancy him a bit, is still as chauvinistic as ever. Interrupted at a wedding reception in Somerset, the pair (along with others) drive back to London to do what they need to solve the crime.

Once again Casey paints a fine word picture that makes you think you've actually been to Richmond Park and the other London locations, and I prefer books in this genre to be set in the UK as it's somewhere to which I can relate. As for the two detectives, old school Derwent knows he can't get anywhere without the calming Kerrigan who, in turn, realises that whatever she may think of his methods, she does admire him in some respects and knows it's not always best to pussyfoot around; sometimes you have to get straight to the point.

The narrative moves along at a fairly brisk pace and the detectives' task is made harder when the body count, all part of the force, begins to mount. Is it a terrorist plot, someone with a grudge, or something else? It's good stuff but I think it's a notch lower than 'The Reckoning' and it makes me wonder how much further the author can take the series.
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