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Up The Junction [DVD]


Price: £3.40 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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Up The Junction [DVD] + Cathy Come Home [DVD] [1966] + A Kind Of Loving [DVD] [1962]
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Product details

  • Actors: Suzy Kendall, Dennis Waterman, Adrienne Posta, Maureen Lipman, Michael Gothard
  • Directors: Peter Collinson
  • Producers: John Brabourne, Anthony Havelock-Allan, Ned Sherrin
  • Format: PAL
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 12
  • Studio: Paramount Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 18 Aug 2008
  • Run Time: 119 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (107 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001AHKGYM
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,996 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

A girl from the fashionable end of Chelsea goes down Market to Battersea to experience life. Based on a semi-documentary about Lond on's freewheeling lifestyles of the 1960s.

Synopsis

Tired of her comfortable life in Chelsea, Polly (Suzy Kendall, To Sir With Love) decides to go 'slumming' in Battersea to see how the other half lives. She soon settles into her new digs, gets a job at a factory, and makes some friends. When one of those friends accidentally falls pregnant, Polly is awakened to the reality that abortion is illegal and can only be gotten through shady back-street dealings. Controversial at the time of its release due to the uncomfortable subject matter, Up the Junction presents a gritty, unappealing view of working class life in Britain, and calls to mind such kitchen sink dramas as Mike Leigh's Vera Drake and Saturday Night and Sunday Morning. Based on the novel of the same name by Nell Dunn.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Lou Knee on 1 Dec 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
One of the most insightful, thought provoking, astute and artistic British movies ever made. And for lovers of London on film, this movie is a must to own, as it portrays Battersea with a real passion, and has some very artistic camera work. It is a very spirited piece of work and you sense that everyone in it believes in it, and isn't just in it for the fame or the money. It is very much a film of its era, and it may be hard for young 20somethings now to relate to, because who talks about the class system and how it affects people's lives now? This was a very 1960s subject, with a lot of radically minded young graduates having had their lives changed by discovering the works of Marx and Gramsci at Univerity and their idealism was one of the main catalysts for the whole swinging 60s scene.

Julie Christie lookalike Suzy Kendall plays the posh young idealist who follows her dream of leaving her stuffy and over privileged life in Chelsea to slum it among the 'more real', 'more alive' people of downmarket Battersea. Her resulting journey looks both nostalgic and other worldly to us now, and perhaps it was laid on a bit thick with the class divide thing and the experiencing real life stuff, but this WAS a different era to today. So it romanticises the lives of down at heel but good hearted Londoners somewhat, and maybe even overstates the effects of the class divide a little but it does make for a moving film experience. Has some fantastically arty scenes, such as the courting scene in the half demolished house where they look out through the rubble at London with an orange sunset. It is both very astute and faintly naive, and really bigs up the idealism of Suzy Kendall's character, who is overall a very believable 1960s character.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Annie May on 25 Sep 2009
Format: DVD
As a young teenager in the late 60s, I worked in the factories along with my older sister. OMG, those scenes brought back so many fun and happy memories! What a wonderful nostalgic trip back in time. Although to myself, it doesn't seem that long ago, in terms of progress, we have come such a long way! For the most part I sat smiling as memories unfolded. It was a difficult time for many families, but people tended to get on with it, and make the most of what they had. This film is a classic, and for those with any interest in the 60s I would urge you to take a look, if only to check out the music, fashions, colours, and those wonderful 'hair do's'.
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Copnovelist on 11 Sep 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A priviledged Chelsea girl, Suzy Kendall, crosses the river to Wandsworth to mix in with the local working-class people in order that she can escape what she believes is her drab and stuffy life. She has the family chauffeur drop her off on the far side of Battersea Bridge and she sets off to land herself a job on the production line of a local sweet factory. Soon, she is accepted by her colleagues and finds herself a room to lodge in. Buying furniture for her place, she meets a local boy (Dennis Waterman). She has a rude awakening when she comes to experience the seemy side of British working class life from which her boyfriend is so desparate to escape and leave behind.

I think that this adaptation from the Nell Dunn story is a true classic of sixties British cinema. There are crisp, vibrant colours and a fantastic sound-track from Manfred Mann that is very reminiscent of the sound of Crosby, Stills & Nash that was still to come. There are also some fine character performances from the likes of Maureen Lipman and Adrienne Posta. The subject matter is very contemporary as abortion was only just being de-criminalised at the time

I've just bought this film on DVD, having previously being conned into buying a pirated copy on E-bay (out of desparation at its non-availability). The picture is a revalation (full wide-screen) and the sound is very good. Unfortunately, there are no extras. I would have thought Dennis Waterman, with all his exposure on tv in recent years, could have at least been given the opportunity of providing an audio commentary, but I'm not complaining.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Griffo on 24 April 2009
Format: DVD
Having heard about the film, I watched it for the first time on this DVD release, and was gobsmacked by the quality of the photography. Having become used to slightly drab, technicolor-style 60's films, this version looks great, and really brings the period alive.

The story is great too, and tackles the hopes and dreams of the different social classes, and their attitudes to life and money. In many ways it all looks a bit innocent now, even the hard-hitting stuff, and you'd imagine that rich Chelsea girl Suzy Kendall would actually have lasted about five minutes in the real world. However, the film is 40 years old, so that could just be the cynical 21st century viewer speaking.

Dennis Waterman looks about fifteen but his acting, along with all the others, is brilliant. I want his scooter too. Everyone looks stylish, except the rockers, and even Maureen Lipman looks hip when she's not in a pinafore. Up the Junction is a superb film, with an atmospheric and evocative soundtrack, and if you have any interest whatsoever in our cultural and social past, have a look at it.
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