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The Iraq War Audio CD – Audiobook, 30 Sep 2004


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Audio CD, Audiobook, 30 Sep 2004
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--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks; Unabridged edition (30 Sep 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786185414
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786185412
  • Product Dimensions: 16.9 x 3 x 16.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)

Product Description

Book Description

The war against Saddam Hussein, described and analysed by our foremost military historian. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

The war against Saddam Hussein, described and analysed by our foremost military historian. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Charles Vasey TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 Jan 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is an odd book; as I read I wondered if the author had been unwell during its gestation. At times we see the old Keegan flashes, but at others it is very slow stuff. Strangely enough, despite the author's field of interest, I found his political summaries by far the best bits of the book. Having said all that I enjoyed the book and found it very useful to be reminded of the proper order of events and the degree to which my memory is not to be trusted. The brief summary of the events around David Kelly's death deserve applause.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A. Callow on 28 May 2008
Format: Paperback
As a long term reader of Keegan's work I found this book a little disapointing. After a very good introduction coviering the recent history of Iraq and a reasonable section on the rise of Saddam (for me John Simpson's coverage is better), I think Keegan loses his objectivity when covering the military operations of Iraqi Freedom and particularly the British Op Telic. The coverage of Op Telic, though only a small part, comes across as particularly gushing.

I disagree with an earlier reviewer about the detail of the military operations. For me Cobra II provided a far better account, as did Rick's Fiasco.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Paul T Horgan VINE VOICE on 8 Jan 2009
Format: Hardcover
The Anglo-American occupation of Iraq is highly controversial for a number of reasons. The military action took second place the months of negotiations beforehand and the insurgency that took place afterwards does make the casualties of the occupation pale into insignificance. In fact the entire campaign of March-April 2003 is highly reminiscent of the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. Resistance was provided by irregulars and was quickly quashed.

So what is there for a military historian to write about? Well, quite a lot. Keegan gives us a potted history of Iraq and the rise of Saddam and also of the attitudes of the population and their faith. He covers the pre-war discussions at the UN, highlighting France's intransigence, which forced Bush and Blair to go it alone. Jacques Chiraq is portrayed in an unflattering light for effectively propping up a disgusting regime (on a side note, this seems consistent - Giscard D'Estaing was mates with the cannibal Bokassa and Mitterand collaborated with the Vichy regime in WWII). He gets into the mindset of all the protagonists and outlines the reasons for their actions and also what divided the western democracies over how to deal with Iraq.

There is little detail about the fighting, but that is not necessary as there was so little - the Iraq army faded away as soldiers threw off their uniforms and went home in civvies.

Keegan briefly covers the aftermath of the fighting, the botched attempt at nation-building and also the Dr Kelly affair.

He has produced a single volume work that will stand the test of time. This is not an instant book.
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3 of 9 people found the following review helpful By D on 11 July 2006
Format: Hardcover
John Keegan has produced a good introduction to the Iraq war in this book. The first few chapters of the book concentrate on the history and religion of Iraq and the Middle East before the rise of Saddam Hussein. This part of the book is particularly interesting and helpful in explaining the current crisis. Keegan then describes the rise of saddam and his clash with the West in 1990 and the current crisis. The military operations are, of course, described in great detail.
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gary Selikow on 7 Nov 2009
Format: Hardcover
John Keegan is a noted military historian who has written comprehensive works on the First and Second World Wars, the Napoleonic War, and intelligence in warfare.
With all the pro-Arab anti-war hype that has dominated discussion of the Iraq War of 2003 by the USA and UK to liberate Iraq from the monstrous tyranny of Saddam Hussein, it is refreshing to find an objective account where actually gleans that the war to free Iraq was in many ways justified.

Keegan studied the war from various perspectives and conducted interviews with General Tommy Franks and the American Secretary of State, Donald Rumsfeld.
He successfully writes a history of the causes, complications and effects of the 2003 War, and investigates and explains the real reasons for the invasion, the successes of the American and British forces (with two fascinating chapters on the military campaigns of each) , the collapse of the Republican Guard, the complete lack of will of the Iraqi people to defend the Saddam dictatorship and the fall of Baghdad to Allied troops.

The Iraqi people had suffered from Saddam's bloody reign of terror for too long and apart form Saddam's own SS, the Republican Guard and loyalists of Saddam's Fascist Ba'ath Party, the Iraqi people had no reason to defend the Saddam regime.
The soldiers of the Iraqi army simply deserted in mass and became civilians. The terrorist fedayeen who opposed the Allied invasion were almost all non-Iraqis, they consisted of Syrian, Saudi, Palestinian, Pakistani and other Islamist who had infiltrated into Iraq.
The Kurds in northern Iraq or rather Iraqi occupied Kurdistan as I see it, were unanimous in their support for the allied invasion and the their was widespread support from the Shia in the south who had long been persecuted by Saddam.
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