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The Invisible Man (Penguin English Library) Paperback – 29 Nov 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (29 Nov. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141389516
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141389516
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.3 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 270,307 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Herbert George Wells was born in Bromley, Kent, England, on September 21, 1866. His father was a professional cricketer and sometime shopkeeper, his mother a former lady's maid. Although "Bertie" left school at fourteen to become a draper's apprentice (a life he detested), he later won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in London, where he studied with the famous Thomas Henry Huxley. He began to sell articles and short stories regularly in 1893.

In 1895, his immediately successful novel rescued him from a life of penury on a schoolteacher's salary. His other "scientific romances" - The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898), The First Men in the Moon (1901), and The War in the Air (1908) - won him distinction as the father of science fiction.

Henry James saw in Wells the most gifted writer of the age, but Wells, having coined the phrase "the war that will end war" to describe World War I, became increasingly disillusioned and focused his attention on educating mankind with his bestselling Outline of History (1920) and his later utopian works. Living until 1946, Wells witnessed a world more terrible than any of his imaginative visions, and he bitterly observed: "Reality has taken a leaf from my book and set itself to supercede me."

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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback
Imagine if you were invisible and could come and go as you pleased, with nobody able to see you. Cool, right? Well, not really. H.G. Wells' "The Invisible Man" has the sci-fi master exploring what would happen if a person took an invisibility elixir, and discovered too late that invisibility has some definite downsides. It's possibly Wells' funniest novel, but it also has some wonderfully chilling moments.

A strange man arrives at a hotel in Iping, wrapped up in goggles, bandages, scarves, and heavy clothes. He spends most of his time hidden away in his room, doing odd scientific experiments, and avoiding contact with other people -- while still keeping everything except his nose hidden. Meanwhile, the local vicar and his wife are robbed by a mysterious thief... who is completely invisible.

Well, you can guess what's up with the stranger -- he's an invisible man, and after a blowup with his landlady he reveals his true.... um, lack of appearance to the entire town. After a series of disastrous encounters, the Invisible Man encounters Dr. Kemp, an old friend to whom he reveals how he became invisible, and what he's done since then... as well as his malevolent plans for the future.

H.G. Wells isn't really known for being a funny writer, but the first part of "The Invisible Man" is actually mildly hilarious. He writes the first third or so of the book in a fairly light, humorous style, and there are some fun scenes speckled through the story, like a homeless man dealing with the Invisible Man ("Not a bit of you visible--except-- You 'aven't been eatin' bread and cheese?").

But things get much darker after Mr. Kemp enters the scene, and we find out that the Invisible Man is... well, kind of malevolent and crazy. Very crazy.
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By bernie TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 July 2013
Format: Paperback
I grew up on all the invisible man movies and still think of him as Claude Rains. I was surprised in the similarities and differences the book has to the movie. The scenes are rearranged from the book to make visual (or invisible) sense as a movie script.

A man all warped up in bandages except for his large pink nose requires a room at the inn and pays well. Slowly the Innkeeper and her companions suspect there is more to his than just a man with bandages. Everyone in a while they glimpse light where there should not be. And the stranger is so cranky that the money may not be worth the trouble of keeping him. Soon there are strange happenings and the cat is out of the bag sort of speaking.

The trail leads to murderer and a possible reign of terror. Read more to find out where the secret is reviled and how a man named Griffin got in this situation.

If I had read this story a year ago I would have said it was a fairly well put together sci-fi story. I would just enjoy the writing and wonder how H.G. came up with the idea. However now after reading much of H.G.'s political writings I see that this is a thinly veiled social commentary. We find that unlike the movie where Griffin goes mad in the invisibility process, that in the book Griffin was always amoral and anything stressful could set him off. Also, somewhere out there is a couple of floating eyes that belong to a cat.

Now one habit that .G. has in most of his tales is that just when you think he is finished on the subject, he will go off in another direction with some sub plot he has slipped in earlier. Therefore, what should have been a short story becomes a novel. Another good example of his witting style can be found in "The Food of the Gods."
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My fave book, beautiful gift x Love it x
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