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The Interior Castle: Or, The Mansions (Forgotten Books) Paperback – 28 Dec 2007

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Product details

  • Paperback: 237 pages
  • Publisher: Forgotten Books (6 Dec. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1605062979
  • ISBN-13: 978-1605062976
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,009,027 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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"Saint Teresa of Ávila (known in religion as Teresa de Jesús, baptized as Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada) (March 28, 1515 – October 4, 1582) was a major figure of the Catholic Reformation as a prominent Spanish mystic and writer and as a monastic reformer. She died just as Catholic nations were making the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar which required the removal of 11 days from the calendar. She likely died on the night of October 4th but perhaps early on the morning of October 15 (in 1582 October 5-14 did not exist), which was adopted as her feast day. She was born at Ávila (85 km northwest of Madrid), Old Castile and died at Alba de Tormes (province of Salamanca). She is recognized by Roman Catholics as one of the thirty-three Doctors of the Church. She is one of only three female Doctors of the Church, along with St. Catherine of Siena, made so in 1970 and St. Thérèse of Lisieux, made so in 1997." (Quote from wikipedia.org)

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Today while I was beseeching the Beloved to speak through me (since I couldn't think of anything to say and had no idea how to begin to fulfill this particular vow of obedience), I had a vision that I will share with you now as a foundation we can build on. Read the first page
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45 of 46 people found the following review helpful By James Gallen TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 25 Sept. 2002
Format: Paperback
"Interior Castle" is St. Theresa of Avila's classical guide to spiritual perfection. Although written to her Sixteenth Century sisters in the Carmelite order, it is readily understandable by contemporary readers.
The premise behind the book is that the road to spiritual perfection consists of passage through seven mansions. The last mansion is the Interior Castle in which God dwells. In each succeeding mansion the soul reaches a higher level of sanctity and the attachment to the world decreases as the soul comes closer to God.
Although some portions of the book describe experiences beyond the expectations of modern readers, this work still provides us all with an insight into a way to draw closer to God. While this book does not provide us with the only route to Heaven, I recommend it to all who are searching for guidance in their spiritual journey
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 11 April 2005
Format: Paperback
Teresa of Avila is one of the more remarkable figures in the history of Christianity. Living in a perilous time, when the Roman Catholic church was suspicious of anything that might develop into Protestant heresies and schisms, she walked a fine line between obedience to the political structure and obedience to God. It is often the case that mystics and spiritual giants are at odds with church structures of the day (this is rather ecumenical, reaching across Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant lines).
Teresa lived at time shortly after the explusion of the Jews from Spain (which occurred in 1492). Her own family was a converso family; hence, there were different dimensions to the wariness of the powers in the culture toward her activities. Being a woman at the time didn't help matters, either, as she defied the stereotypes in several ways, by seeking education and leadership opportunities, all the while being part of the discalced Carmelites, who strive to cultivate humility and poverty.
Teresa's life was not an easy one; she suffered physical ailments and political difficulties. However, she was also a sought-after advisor, spiritual leader, and fairly prolific author. Her various writings made her famous in her own day, but the towering achievement that has lasted over time is without doubt 'Interior Castle'. This text shows a spiritual journey on the inside, developing different walks through aspects of spiritual life and prayer developed in seven stages, or mansions.
The life of prayer is the castle, with seven stages of development. The first three stages are pieces that humankind can practice with their own efforts; the final four stages are those which are given from God, and God alone - no human effort can reach these places.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 6 Jan. 2006
Format: Paperback
Teresa of Avila is one of the more remarkable figures in the history of Christianity. Living in a perilous time, when the Roman Catholic church was suspicious of anything that might develop into Protestant heresies and schisms, she walked a fine line between obedience to the political structure and obedience to God. It is often the case that mystics and spiritual giants are at odds with church structures of the day (this is rather ecumenical, reaching across Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant lines).
Teresa lived at time shortly after the explusion of the Jews from Spain (which occurred in 1492). Her own family was a converso family; hence, there were different dimensions to the wariness of the powers in the culture toward her activities. Being a woman at the time didn't help matters, either, as she defied the stereotypes in several ways, by seeking education and leadership opportunities, all the while being part of the discalced Carmelites, who strive to cultivate humility and poverty.
Teresa's life was not an easy one; she suffered physical ailments and political difficulties. However, she was also a sought-after advisor, spiritual leader, and fairly prolific author. Her various writings made her famous in her own day, but the towering achievement that has lasted over time is without doubt 'Interior Castle'. This text shows a spiritual journey on the inside, developing different walks through aspects of spiritual life and prayer developed in seven stages, or mansions.
The life of prayer is the castle, with seven stages of development. The first three stages are pieces that humankind can practice with their own efforts; the final four stages are those which are given from God, and God alone - no human effort can reach these places.
Read more ›
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By padraig caughey on 16 Oct. 2003
Format: Paperback
In my humble opinion the best book on mysticism and the most readable ever written. Teresa herself said that God can give the soul three great mystical gifts. the gift of prayer itself, the gift to understand it and the gift to explain it to others. God gave her these gifts superlatively . She is down to earth, humerous and (this can be said for very few mystics) eminently easy to understand). You will read this again and again.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Dec. 1998
Format: Paperback
Interior Castle, by St. Teresa of Avila, is one of the saint's writings that is filled with spiritual insight, charm, and breathtaking closeness to God. Her castle is the God within, and there are outward mansions that must be penetrated to get to this inner treasure. Each mansion is a deepening of one's knowledge of God, and a step further away from one's capture by externality and the world. She describes these inward steps, and leads one onward to union with God (or God carries one onward - at first it is our efforts, than it is God's). Beautiful and illuminating.
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