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The Ides of April (Falco: The New Generation) Hardcover – 11 Apr 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton; First Edition edition (11 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1444755811
  • ISBN-13: 978-1444755817
  • Product Dimensions: 16.4 x 3.3 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (179 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 145,588 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Lindsey Davis has written nearly thirty novels, beginning with The Course of Honour, the love story of the Emperor Vespasian and Antonia Caenis. There are twenty books in her bestselling mystery series features laid-back First Century detective Marcus Didius Falco and his partner Helena Justina, plus friends, relations, pets and bitter enemy the Chief Spy. Following her major standalone, Master and God, a new series featuring Flavia Albia, Falco's adopted daughter, is now under way, complemented by a digital novella, The Spook Who Spoke Again. She has also written books set in the English Civil War, Rebels and Traitors and A Cruel Fate (a Quickread). Her books are translated into many languages and serialised on BBC Radio 4. Past Chair of the Crimewriters' Association and The Society of Authors, and a Vice President of the Classical Association, she has won the CWA Ellis Peters Historical Dagger, the Dagger in the Library, and a Sherlock award for Falco as Best Comic Detective, plus international awards such as the Premio Colosseo 'For enhancing the image of Rome'. She lives in the Midlands where she grew up.

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Review

Praise for MASTER AND GOD:

'The narrative is rapid and the story well told with much sharp-edged detail. You can open this book and step right into a convincing yet extraordinary past.'

(Independent)

'Davis's descriptions of Rome are vivid and lively...this is a great yarn' ( Daily Mail)

'While this book is a departure from her usual Falco novels, the trademark charm, piercing intelligence and ready wit are as abundant as ever... dramatic and enthralling, all the more so for being full of historical fact. The characters are intriguing and three-dimensional, and the whole is told with a humour and insight which means the reader will find the book impossible to put down.' (www.thebookbag.co.uk)

'An intimate portrait of resilience, friendship and love' (Sunday Examiner, Australia)

Book Description

Falco: the new generation - Introducing Flavia Albia.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 78 people found the following review helpful By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 25 Feb. 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Lindsey Davis is, of course, well known to legions of fans for her Falco detective series. Now, she has cleverly created a spin off series, with Flavia Albia, Falco's adopted daughter, as the the main character. This is very much a new series, so it does not matter whether you have read any (or all) of the Falco novels - previous characters, such as family members, are mentioned, but always with explanations as to who is who, and Flavia Albia is very much the main character in her own setting. However, if you are a fan of the Falco novels, even the location will be familiar, as Favia Albia lives in Fountain Court, where her father first lived in the first book The Silver Pigs: (Falco 1). Like her father, Flavia Albia is also an private informer, with an independent streak and a wish to succeed at her chosen profession.

Being a woman both limits Flavia Albia in her investigations and yet gives her better access to information when interviewing female clients. The author paints a vibrant picture of Rome, with all the problems and limitations women faced in everyday life. When a client of Flavia Albia's dies suddenly, her main concern is that she will no longer be paid. However, the woman's stepson is unwilling to accept the death as natural and asks her to investigate. To her surprise, Flavia Albia discovers that other, previously healthy and active people, have died suddenly and it seems a murderer is stalking the streets of Rome. Originally, Flavia Albia is warned off the case, but when it becomes apparent that a female investigator could help, she joins forces with Morellus, a vigiles investigator, and Tiberius, who works for the aedile Manlius Faustus, to track down the killer.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keen Reader TOP 100 REVIEWER on 8 Feb. 2015
Format: Paperback
This is the first book in the new (sub)series by Lindsey Davis, which features Flavia Albia, daughter of Falco (the protagonist of the main Falco series by Davis). I picked up the second book in this Flavia Albia series, Enemies at Home, and read it before I went back and read this one. Oddly enough, I think if I had read this first book in the series previous to reading the second one, I may well not have gone on to read any more, because I did not enjoy this first book quite as much as I enjoyed the second.

In the first half of the book, Flavia Albia comes across as someone with a chip on her shoulder as big as the Colosseum, and it became rather irritating after a while, when she kept dismissing everyone she came across as either beneath her notice or a lying hypocrite. Happily, the second half of the book came across much better; the plot of the story picked up, and the characters as a whole in the story became much more interesting.

Flavia Albia is an informer in Rome in the reign of Domitian, a rather unpredictable emperor on whose wrong side it was not wise to get; and the life of an informer could be rather dangerous, let alone for a woman. Luckily Flavia Albia had a good upbringing with her loyal and loving family after a rocky start in life, and she is no ordinary shrinking Roman matron. When she is asked to investigate the sudden death of one of her clients, she at first dismisses the notion that the death was anything but natural. But delving further into the underworld of Rome, she finds a number of apparently unlinked but sudden deaths. Could they have any relation to the death of her client, and what could their links be?

This story certainly picked up in the second half, and got better as it went along. On the strength of my enjoyment of the second book in the series, I will most definitely look out for the third book. Hopefully Flavia Albia continues to find more mysteries in the world of Rome in the first century AD.
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful By G K Kinsky on 18 April 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Oh dear, I really, really wanted to like this novel. I own and have enjoyed all of Ms Davies's novels (well a few of the very late Falcos were a little hard work). The new main character is exactly my age. I have been really looking forward to reading this book. I have had it on pre order for months but .....

For me this book lacked things I was looking for from a hot stuff Lindsay Davies novel. I came to the table expecting a tight clever plot, humour and above all joy de vivre and I found a very tired plot (that I almost couldn't be bothered waiting for the conclusion of), an understandably (given her life experiences) bitter and tiresome leading character who had none of the charm and wit I was looking for in the daughter of Falco. There was just no bounce.

I didn't hate this book. It is well written and life in ancient Rome is beautifully brought to life in the background. I just found the story and the heroine uninteresting. I am afraid my eyes kept glassing over as I read. I kept wishing Falco would come out of the background and draw my attention.

I am so sorry Ms Davies because I really love the Silver Pigs and I was hoping that this was going to be Silver Pigs mark two. I shall keep reading Ms Davies as I am sure there will be a return to form!
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Penny Waugh on 9 Mar. 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I've loved all the Falco books, and was dismayed to realise that the rather downbeat Nemesis was likely to be his last investigation. Now, some years later in the unhappy reign of the Emperor Domitian, his adopted daughter, Flavia Albia, has stepped into his old office in Fountain Court, and is doing quite nicely as an informer and investigator in her own right.
Albia is still in many ways the wilful child of the Falco books, but at 29 and ten years a widow, she has her head screwed on and knows what she wants and how to get it. Drawn, reluctantly on the part of her male counterparts, into the investigation of a series of sudden deaths by poison, she proves her worth and stands firmly on her own feet.
It is the detail of Roman life, the wonderfully drawn characters (even the minor ones) who come right off the page, and the sometimes wicked humour, that make this book, and the Falco books, such a delight to read. We may not meet Falco directly here, but his presence is still very much felt I love the way the story is told in modern English and I do not find this detracts from the historical feel.
There is romance here, if rather hasty and possibly ill-judged, Albia is very human; pathos, in the horrible fate of the foxes sacrificed to Ceres which upsets her enough to take matters into her own hands; love of family - even for her obnoxious younger adopted brother Postumus (of whom I'm sure we will hear more); loyalty and determination.
Tiberius, the runner for the aedile, Andronicus the charmer, Ronan the door keeper, Junillus her deaf cousin, Robigo the fox - too many vibrant characters to name but they all fit perfectly into the story.
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