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The Hurdy Gurdy Man
 
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The Hurdy Gurdy Man

9 May 2005 | Format: MP3

£3.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £9.52 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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3:18
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1:42
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2:48
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5:02

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 9 May 2005
  • Release Date: 9 May 2005
  • Label: Parlophone UK
  • Copyright: 2005 Parlophone Records Ltd. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2005 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 57:41
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001JQ05OU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 26,850 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Morten Vindberg on 8 Oct 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
"Hurdy Gurdy Man" was Donovan's 1968 album, built up around the strong singles "Hurdy Gurdy Man" and "Jennifer Juniper". Like Donovan's other Micky Most produced albums this one touches upon a great varity of musical styles and instrumentations, with tasteful and original arrangements by John Cameron. Some of the more rocking tunes were arranged by John Paul Jones of Led Zeppelin - e.g. the stunningly build-up title track, starting with Donovan's silent humming joined by his acoustic guitar and building up towords its climax with electric guitars and drums. The overall sound-quality of this re-mastered version is great!

"Jennifer Juniper" is a beautifully arranged pop-ballad featuring both oboe and harp.

The album features a handful catchy free and easy tunes among which "The Entertaining of a Shy Girl"and "The Sun is a very Magic Fellow" stand out!

A couple of the droning tunes, combing traditional Eastern sounds with Celtic sounds, may sound a little dated.

"West Indian Lady" revives memories of the Caribbean feel of Donovan's earlier single "There is a Mountain".

A few tracks like "As I Recall it" and "Get Thy Bearings" are quite jazzy, and "Hi, It's Been a Long Time" is a great pop-tune, beautifully instrumentated.

Among the 7 bonus-tracks several stand out. The B-side "Teen Angel" is an early Donovan composition; a fine melody and a great addition.

The album out-take "What a Beautiful Creature You Are" is a fun track with a very catchy melody. The song features singer Lulu. The song ought have been included on the original album.

The two re-recordings of "Catch the Wind" and Colours" done for a for a best of album, are both fine, though they lack the charm of the original versions.

All in all another fine Donovan reissue!
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Feb 2006
Format: Audio CD
This record continues to astonish. If A Gift From A Flower To A Garden (Donovan’s Songs Of Innocence And Experience?) mixed simpler instruments alongside lush and textured orchestrations, The Hurdy Gurdy Man created a tapestry of delights from more diverse sources. The influence of eastern music was more apparent here than on any of Donovan’s music since some of the songs on Sunshine Superman, and on this record it soaked into the very fibres of the sound. Here, Donovan develops eastern tones most clearly and obviously in Tangier (words by Gypsy Dave) and, surprisingly, Peregrine (a song also influenced by the atonal drones of the pipes and strings of Donovan’s Scottish roots;) songs which are quite unlike anything he had previously recorded. These experimental musings are gloriously successful, creating a mood which perfectly fits with the other, more familiar sounding, songs on this collection.
The Entertaining Of A Shy Girl and The Sun Is A Very Magic Fellow return Donovan to the sounds created on For Little Ones: acoustic guitar, flute, and percussion so light it could float away. Vignettes of life were always a real source for Donovan the storyteller, and Shy Girl captures its scene brilliantly. McNair’s flute playing simply soars away on so many of these performances. Just exquisite.
Elsewhere, Donovan’s jazz influences are allowed full reign, with the uptempo As I Recall It, the majestic Get Thy Bearings and the knowing Teas all doffing their cap to the Jazz tones and textures Donovan had decided to foreground. The Jazz influence was completed by the stunning Hi Its Been A Long Time, a brilliantly fused mix of Jazz, pop and pyschedelia which ranks along Donovan’s finest work of this period.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Quill Dragon on 12 May 2005
Format: Audio CD
This EMI remastered version of the album "The Hurdy Gurdy Man" is a great buy for Donovan novices and collectors alike. For novices because it will buy them a great Donovan album of deeply meditative and highly playful songs, which all lovers of music deserve to hear.
For collectors of Donovan this release is also a great buy because it contains "Aye my love" and "What a Beautiful Creature You Are". The song "Aye my love" has not, as far as I know, been released since back in 1968 where it came out in the US on a single together with "Lalena". The atmosphere of "Aye my love" is alike to that of "Poor Cow", so if you liked that song you need to hear "Aye my love".
"What a Beautiful Creature You Are" has never been released before, which is a pity since it is catchy earful for sure! It is a highly humorous tune, which if anything reminds me of "The Intergalactic Laxative" from Donovan's "Cosmic Wheels" album. Yes, it is that good.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on 24 May 2005
Format: Audio CD
The idea that Donovan Leitch was to Britain what Bob Dylan was to America was always an unfair comparison to make and you have to think if Scottish folk-pop singer's first name had started with any letter other than "D" he might have been saved the analysis. Then again, anybody who cannot listen to the music these two were putting out in the 1960s and not be able to see their music as being opposites is simply not paying attention. Donovan was always the cheerful optimist, while Dylan on a good day was merely being realistic instead of pessimistic. That was just in terms of their lyrics, because once you got to the music Dylan was defined by stark guitar playing sometimes augmented by a harmonica in the style of Woody Guthrie while Donovan was helping to define the psychedelic sound.
In 1965 Donovan was a regular on the television music show "Ready, Steady, Go!" and then had his début single, the folk song "Catch the Wind." That was followed by the hit single "Colours," and then "Sunshine Superman" and "Mellow Yellow." In 1967 he traveled to India with the Beatles to study with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, after which he renounced drugs and turned on to meditation. Musically these profound changes manifested themselves in the ambitious double-album "A Gift from a Flower to a Garden" and then this 1968 album, "The Hurdy Gurdy Man." The scope of the album is covered in the two hits. The title cut (on which future Led Zeppelin members Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones and John Bonham were playing) is a mixture of Indian music with hard-rock, tinged with hallucinatory elements that made it to #5 on the charts. On the other extreme is the more ethereal "Jennifer Juniper," written for Jenny Boyd, the sister of George Harrison's wife, which climbed to #26.
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