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The Hundredth Man (Carson Ryder, Book 1) Paperback – 16 May 2005


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Product details

  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (16 May 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007180594
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007180592
  • Product Dimensions: 11.4 x 3.4 x 17.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 695,205 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

J A Kerley worked in advertising and teaching before becoming a full-time novelist. He lives in Newport, Kentucky, but also spends a good deal of time in Southern Alabama, the setting for his Carson Ryder series, starting with 'The Hundredth Man'. He is married with two children.

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Review

Praise for The Hundredth Man:

‘A chilling journey into a pitch-black mind’ Michael Marshall

‘The Hundredth Man has a crackerjack plot and wonderfully original rapid-fire prose. Jack Kerley is a writer to watch. And read.’ David Baldacci

‘The Hundredth Man delivers a sturdy hero with a clear-cut mission and a setting that holds possibilities for fresh adventures. Kerley writes in a thrusting style that pushes the action…’ New York Times Book Review

‘A serial killer novel with a difference. The whole story is told in prose as inventive as a fight to the death between embattled virtue and monstrous evil ought to be’ Kirkus

About the Author

Jack Kerley worked in advertising and teaching before becoming a full-time novelist. He lives in Newport, Kentucky, but also spends a good deal of time in Southern Alabama, the setting for The Hundredth Man. He is married with two children.


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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By SonicQuack VINE VOICE on 19 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback
It's disappointing when the actual investigation and hunt for a bloody serial killer is the least interesting part of a crime thriller. Kerley spends much of his time building the central character and his relationships with his co-workers, friends and family. The actual plot at times seems almost secondary, and where this approach may well be suited to a book within a series, in a standalone novel (or in this case the first in a series) then it can make for quite arduous reading. The main detective isn't particularly interesting either, however the political infighting within the police department is sharp and entertaining, offering an insight in to what Kerley is capable of. Overall, The Hundreth Man offers little fresh content, although there are definitely green shoots for the future.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Michael Watson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 Aug. 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As with a previous reviewer, I bought this book prior to reading the recently advertised The Death Collectors and I'm certainly glad I did. Carson Ryder is a really well-created character; not full of the usual gung-ho American super-cop stuff but well capable of taking a hit and dealing one out IF it's necessary.

The story is compelling and you'd need to be a linguist, I think, to work out who the killer is. The clues are there for sure but I missed them! I think I was reading the book too quickly to see how Ryder dealt with both his superiors and his rather less than perfect friends. Anyway, he's around for another story and I'm just about to read it. Can't wait.......
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By "stevelilley6" on 21 Feb. 2006
Format: Paperback
Im not a real fan of American serial killers but this blew me away. It was brillinatly written, pacey and tense. The lead Detective was (as usual) brilliant and unpredicatable and hates the top brass, but then again so will you, what an idiot the chief is. Some nasty murders have gone on in Alabamha and Carson Ryder and the 'Pissit' team have to solve them.
I enjoyed this. If you like Thomas Harris/Karin Slaughter/Tess Geritsen etc you will love this.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 July 2004
Format: Hardcover
The Hundredth Man is one of the most original and interesting police procedurals I have read. Mr. Kerley has a powerful imagination and the writing ability to make the story live for a reader. The only thing that's missing is creating a chilling sense of dread of the sort that having truly creepy and threatening villains can bring. I missed that element. I was hoping that there was a Hannibal Lector character hiding away in the story somewhere. Close, but not quite.
The story comes across as though it is the second in a series, so perhaps we will be treated to a prequel someday to fill in the interesting background of how Carson Ryder became a police detective with a specialty in dealing with the psychology behind crimes.
Carson Ryder and his partner, Harry Nautilus, form a two-man unit, PSIT (humor apparently intended) that is frequently on the receiving end of that invocation from politically ambitious members of the force. They are called in to handle a case involving a headless corpse found in a park. The primary clue involves an unusual message placed in an unusual location. What does it mean? If you can figure it out, you're a genius. I don't recall such an original concept for a clue. More crimes follow and the partners find themselves having as much trouble with their superiors as with the uncaught criminal.
The story has marvelous misdirection that keeps the plot humming along.
Unlike many first novels with fine plots, the story has intriguing and original characters whose stories will fascinate you. I was disappointed that these characters were not developed even more. They move past their difficulties a little too easily for my taste.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Arvinder Marwaha on 1 July 2006
Format: Paperback
I saw an advert for Jack Kerley's other title "The Death Collectors" and thought to myself, "That looks interesting". I then looked the book up online a few days later and read various reviews noting that this; "The Hundredth Man" was his first novel attempt. I decided to give them a try...

I found "The Hundredth Man" a very good page turner. I found myself finishing the books in days rather than weeks, something I rarely do. I made time to go through each chapter often forcing myself to stay up late at night just to find out what happens next.

I would highly recommend this book, especially to new readers to this genre like myself. The descriptions and details are in good varied depths, never giving too much away but always leaving you to want more. The main characters (as it continues through the other book) become true acquaintances to the reader, people you just want to know more about.

PS - I have already pre-ordered his next two books!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By OEJ TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 Sept. 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A debut novel from Jack Kerley, one that tells the tale of a psychopathic serial killer in Alabama and the efforts made by lead character Detective Carson Ryder to catch him (or her).

As a regular reader of crime fiction, I have deliberately concentrated on first-time novelists recently and have been more than happy with the two previous choices in my `to be read' pile, Brian Freeman's IMMORAL and Nick Stone's MR CLARINET. And while this novel here was pretty good, I wasn't exactly blown away by it. The story is told mainly from a first-person perspective with occasional peeps into the mind of the killer in the third-person. It starts quite promisingly but when I finished the final page I realised that there were too many unanswered questions, questions that had been raised by the author himself. Not the least of these was the reason for the title of this book, together with the relationship between the woman who represents the (very mild) love interest for the hero, and the obsession the killer has for her. She is an alcoholic, and while I have no first-hand experience of this condition, I thought her portrayal was handled very convincingly by the writer, although we are left to assume that Ryder's efforts to cure her were successful as her `clean-ness' was never fully explained. More importantly though I found myself a little confused by the motives and MO of the suspect, it was exotically displayed but not fully explained. And I would imagine that anyone who has read The Silence of the Lambs will be slightly irritated by the use of the mental institutionalised multiple murderer being used by the police for insights into the hunt for their latest target. It would have been a good idea if it wasn't so unoriginal and very familiar to millions.
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