The Hotel on Place Vendome and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £20.00
  • You Save: £4.00 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Medium mark / wear on the front cover. All purchases eligible for Amazon customer service and a 30-day return policy.
Trade in your item
Get a £4.54
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Hotel on Place Vendome: Life, Death, and Betrayal at the Hotel Ritz in Paris Hardcover – 10 Apr 2014


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£16.00
£9.65 £8.50

Frequently Bought Together

The Hotel on Place Vendome: Life, Death, and Betrayal at the Hotel Ritz in Paris + Hotel Florida: Truth, Love and Death in the Spanish Civil War
Price For Both: £33.00

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £4.54
Trade in The Hotel on Place Vendome: Life, Death, and Betrayal at the Hotel Ritz in Paris for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £4.54, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Harper (10 April 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061791083
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061791086
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.7 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 54,015 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

“This gorgeously written (and photographed) book is a feast for readers wanting to be swept away this summer. . . . Tracing the captivating history of Paris’s world-famous Hôtel Ritz, Mazzeo reveals a hotbed of illicit affairs and deadly intrigue, as well as stunning acts of defiance and treachery.” (Brad Thor, The Today Show Summer Reads)

“Stolen art, double agents, a legendary bartender passing notes to the resistance: This is a rich, messy history.” (Kirkus Reviews)

“Mazzeo pulls back the heavy curtains of the Ritz in Paris to reveal a steamy world of sex, drugs, partying and political intrigue.” (Alan Riding, author of And The Show Went On: Cultural Life in Nazi-Occupied Paris)

“Mazzeo enthrallingly depicts a hotbed of both the magnificent and the mundane. . . . Readers will enjoy Mazzeo’s fascinating collection of secretive, scheming historical characters, all under one elegant roof.” (Publishers Weekly)

“Fiction could not write betrayal, resistance, collaboration, or celebration with more robustness or with a more alluring who’s-who of writers, artists, and military powers than history did in this single hotel. ” (Booklist)

“Tilar J. Mazzeo tells the tale of the Hotel Ritz, a landmark so imbued with glamour that it was the only hotel in Paris the Nazis ordered to stay open during the war. The antics at and around it during World War II were often shocking.” (New York Post)

“Must read. . . . Mazzeo artfully transports readers to the Nazi occupation of World War II . . . The Hôtel on Place Vendôme contextualizes the opulence of 1940s Paris, making for a work of history that reads as enticingly as a novel.” (Harper's Bazaar)

“An illuminating history of the intrigue and drama taking place inside its elegant façade. . . . The narrative reads like fiction, with the difference being accurate testimony from well-researched documents and interviews.” (Bookreporter)

From the Back Cover

Established in 1898 in the heart of Paris on the Place Vendôme, the Hôtel Ritz instantly became an icon of the city frequented by film stars and celebrity writers, American heiresses and risqué flappers, politicians, playboys, and princes. By the 1920s the bar became a favorite watering hole for F. Scott Fitzgerald and other writers of the Lost Generation, including Ernest Hemingway. In June 1940, when France fell to the Germans, Joseph Goebbels, the propaganda minister of the Third Reich, famously declared that the nation's capital would remain a high-spirited place—or else. Orders from Berlin specified that the Hôtel Ritz would be the only luxury hotel of its kind in occupied Paris.

Tilar J. Mazzeo traces the history of this cultural landmark from its opening in fin de siècle Paris to the modern era. At its center, The Hotel on Place Vendôme chronicles life at the Ritz during wartime, when the hotel simultaneously served as headquarters to the highest-ranking German officers, such as Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring, and home to wealthy patrons (and to the spies among them) who stayed on in Paris. At Coco Chanel's table in the dining room on any given evening, one might find the playwright and screenwriter Sacha Guitry, the lithe Russian ballet star Serge Lifar, or Jean Cocteau and his handsome boyfriend.

Mazzeo takes us into the grand palace's suites, bars, dining rooms, and wine cellars, revealing a hotbed of illicit affairs and deadly intrigue, as well as stunning acts of defiance and treachery, in which refugees were hidden in secret rooms, a Jewish bartender passed coded messages for the German resistance, and Wehrmacht officers plotted to assassinate the Führer. By the spring of 1944, as the tides of the war shifted, these stories were all coming to their dramatic and sometimes heartbreaking conclusions. There were celebrations as well: when Ernest Hemingway returned in the last hours of the occupation with his rogue band of "irregular" troops to liberate the Hôtel Ritz, they also liberated many bottles of vintage wine from its cellars.

The result is the story of The Hotel on Place Vendôme—a singular season at the world-class hotel, an intimate and riveting portrait of the last days of the Second World War.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 Mar 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Subtitled, "Life, Death and Betrayal at the Hotel Ritz in Paris," this book begins with the 1940 Occupation of Paris by the Nazi's, before backtracking to the Ritz opening in 1898. Paris in 1898 was split by the scandal known as the Dreyfus Affair, which divided the aristocracy from the traditionalists of the Belle-Epoque and the new, upcoming artists and intellectuals. The author uses Marcel Proust as an example of one of the new modern supporters of Dreyfus, who claimed the Ritz as their home - artists, intellectuals and outcasts. Proust is again identified during a chapter set during WWI, to show how the war was largely ignored in the Ritz. However, most of this book is set before and after the Second World War, by which time Proust had died and this kind of thread is one which weakens the book in my opinion, by not carrying throughout the storyline.

The author sets the scene of the occupation of Paris well. The elderly Marie-Louise Ritz, widow of the founder Cesar Ritz, had to make the decision of whether or not to keep the hotel open, with only a skeleton staff remaining as most people fled Paris as the German army advanced. Warned that the building might be requisitioned and that she may never get it back, she decided to take advice to stay open, with the help of her Swiss Director, Claude Aurcello. Indeed, The Ritz remained, "a Switzerland in Paris," throughout the war. The fact that it consisted of two separate buildings, connected by a long corridor, meant that there was a natural partition between the German high-ranking officers and the smaller building, which remained open to the public; including artists, writers, film stars, playwrights, fashion designers and a smattering of spies.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By gt on 27 May 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This great book covers in detail the history of the iconic Ritz Hotel with particular focus on the vWW2 years. The Nazis liked the grandeur of the hotel so much that they basically chose to leave it as neutral territory. During its interesting history it was a home for some of the richest, artistic and most hedonistic people in the world. There are great anecdotes about Marlene Dietrich, Picasso, Herman Goering, The Duke and Duchesse of Windsor, Hemmingway, Frank Capa and many more. A delight to absorb
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I could not put this book down - so interesting and credit must go to Tilar J. Mazzeo for the research and interesting facts and figures for those people who frequented The Hotel on Place Vendome (Hotel Ritz) in Paris - from the establishment in 1898 and during the period up to WWI and thereafter in the 1920's through to the WWII years. For me I recognised many of the famous names (German, English, French and American) who frequented the Ritz. There were many incidents of of spies, illicit love affairs, and deadly intrigues as well as stunning acts of defiance and treachery. Can very highly recommend this book for those who enjoy past history and a trip down "memory lane"..........Annabel
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Gail Cooke TOP 500 REVIEWER on 21 Jun 2014
Format: Hardcover
It all seems too impossible, too cloak-and-dagger to be true, but apparently it is. As the idea for this book was forming in Mazzeo's mind she was able to speak to the widow of a man who had been in the Resistance, the underground movement that fought the Nazis in occupied France. The old woman warned her not to write about the Hotel Ritz and the story of the occupation saying the questions Mazzeo was asking were too treacherous and further many of those who claim to have been in the Resistance are "simply liars."

Obviously, Mazzeo did not listen to that advice for here it is - dare you to put down this fascinating tale of "Life, Death and Betrayal at the Hotel Ritz in Paris." There was also quite a bit of subterfuge, love and illicit liaisons. And what a cast of characters! When France fell to the Germans the Ritz became headquarters for the high ranking German officers such has Reichsmarschall Hermann Goring who occupied the most luxurious suite and had an outsized tub built to his specifications. It was also home from time to time to very rich patrons, war correspondents and the glitterati.

Paris is occupied but picture, if you will, Coco Chanel's table in the dining room where you might find playwrights, screen writers, ballet stars, even Jean Cocteau and his good looking boyfriend. More often Chanel could be seen about town with her handsome lover, a ranking German soldier. Hemingway hung out at the bar as did photographer Robert Capa (Ingrid Bergman's lover for a time). Picasso and Proust were often seen there as was Marlene Dietrich. Add to this mix the staff who pretended to be serving Hitler's officers while actually supporting the Resistance. Particularly outstanding was a Jewish bartender who passed coded messages.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback