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The Red Horseman (Jake Grafton Novels) [Audiobook] [Audio CD]

Stephen Coonts , Benjamin L. Darcie
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

4 Mar 2014 Jake Grafton Novels (Book 6)
The bestselling author of Flight of the Intruder and Under Siege presents another Jake Grafton novel that blows the lid off an issue of inte rnational urgency. Dispatched to Moscow to destroy 20,000 tactical nuclear weapons before they fall into the wrong hands, Grafton learns that he has been targeted for assassination.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (4 Mar 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1480515388
  • ISBN-13: 978-1480515383
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 15.7 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Book Description

Non-stop action and suspense in this terrific Jake Grafton thriller from the bestselling author of LIBERTY --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Stephen Coonts is a former naval aviator who flew combat missions during the Vietnam War. His previous novels have been worldwide bestsellers. A former attorney, he resides with his wife and son in Las Vegas, Nevada. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stephen Coonts flying high at a low altitude 13 Jan 2005
Format:Paperback
The high point of "The Red Horseman" is the aerial dogfight between Jake Grafton (flying a Russian Su-25 "Frogfoot") and four Russian Su-27 "Flankers", with most of the action taking place below 200 ft. altitude! Stephen Coonts is very good at writing about this kind of combat, and you really feel that you're right there in the cockpit with Jake.
This book is the fifth or sixth (depending on how you number them) book in the Jake Grafton series. By now Stephen Coonts had established himself as a worthy competitor to Tom Clancy, and in my opinion his books are better than Clancy's. In particular, the characters in a Stephen Coonts book are real people, and people you enjoy learning more and more about.
In the first two-thirds of "The Red Horseman" the story unfolds slowly, but satisfactorily, as an international political thriller. Jake, now a Rear Admiral in the American Defense Intelligence Agency, is sent to Moscow to help monitor the Russian dismantling of their nuclear warheads. The CIA is also involved, but not in the way we would expect, and of course some warheads go missing.
The last third of the book becomes a techno-thriller. The hunt is on to retrieve the missing warheads and to ensure that no more will be stolen. In addition to the great dogfight mentioned above there is a very detailed description of how a major military operation to secure an enemy airfield would be done nowadays.
I found this last section of the book to be the most interesting and exciting part. The whole thing is rather unrealistic, but the reader is willing to ignore that because it's so exciting. Unfortunately, I thought that the ending was a bit too far out, and this is part of the reason for the lack of the fifth star.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Any one seen my nuke? 15 Jan 2014
By SBno1 TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Not one of the best Jake Grafton books I have read, but also not one to be missed in the series.

The Soviet Union is collapsing and its arsenal of 20,000 nukes are to be destroyed. Jake Grafton is tasked with seeing to their safe destruction, but others have different ideas, some of which are his fellow countrymen. There is money to be made in the black market of nukes and as Jake stands in their way, he is ear marked for assassination.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Where do we go from here? 22 Aug 2008
By Michael Watson TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
I try to enjoy Stephen Coonts's books. I remember reading 'Hong Kong' years ago and was well pleased. But recently, I find his books are all pretty much the same. I love military aircraft, gadgetry, defeating the ragbags the free world usually has to face in these books and yet, somehow, they take me nowhere.

The best I can say, really, is that, if you're on your hols and it's raining or you're lying in the shade kicking the sand, his books will certainly pass the time. If you're looking for a hi-tech action thriller, forget it.

I can think of quite a few authors who now churn out books at the drop of a finger on the keyboard. If only some of the lesser-known authors could be given more publicity..........
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  46 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stephen Coonts flying high at a low altitude 30 Dec 2004
By Rennie Petersen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The high point of "The Red Horseman" is the aerial dogfight between Jake Grafton (flying a Russian Su-25 "Frogfoot") and four Russian Su-27 "Flankers", with most of the action taking place below 200 ft. altitude! Stephen Coonts is very good at writing about this kind of combat, and you really feel that you're right there in the cockpit with Jake.

This book is the fifth or sixth (depending on how you number them) book in the Jake Grafton series. By now Stephen Coonts had established himself as a worthy competitor to Tom Clancy, and in my opinion his books are better than Clancy's. In particular, the characters in a Stephen Coonts book are real people, and people you enjoy learning more and more about.

In the first two-thirds of "The Red Horseman" the story unfolds slowly, but satisfactorily, as an international political thriller. Jake, now a Rear Admiral in the American Defense Intelligence Agency, is sent to Moscow to help monitor the Russian dismantling of their nuclear warheads. The CIA is also involved, but not in the way we would expect, and of course some warheads go missing.

The last third of the book becomes a techno-thriller. The hunt is on to retrieve the missing warheads and to ensure that no more will be stolen. In addition to the great dogfight mentioned above there is a very detailed description of how a major military operation to secure an enemy airfield would be done nowadays.

I found this last section of the book to be the most interesting and exciting part. The whole thing is rather unrealistic, but the reader is willing to ignore that because it's so exciting. Unfortunately, I thought that the ending was a bit too far out, and this is part of the reason for the lack of the fifth star.

Also on the negative side, I found Stephen Coonts opinion of post-glasnost Russia overly derogatory. He has his characters saying "nothing works here" and "Russia is on its way to the stone age" so many times it becomes silly. This is especially true with the hindsight we have now that Russia did survive the Yeltsin era and is slowly but surely becoming a developed country by western standards.

A very interesting sub-plot in "The Red Horseman" involves the death of a British newspaper mogul named Nigel Keren. Stephen Coonts has very clearly modeled Nigel Keren on the real-life Robert Maxwell. Even their dates of death are identical!

In conclusion, a very good techno-thriller, up to the usual Stephen Coonts standards. If you like military techno-thrillers with lots of political skullduggery, then this is for you.

Rennie Petersen
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but poorly written 20 Feb 2004
By "leomontg" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I can't believe I made it through the book, this is the first book in a long time that I have been tempted to drop in the middle. The plot is very interesting and at times kept my attention. It also got more and more improbable as the plot grinded its gears through the book. Jake Grafton is apparently some kind of god and can do anything and go anywhere apparently without authority from anyone else but himself. The book would have been alright if these were its only flaws, after all it is a novel and I expected to put my disbelief on hold while I read (not everyone can write like Clancy).

The major problem with the book is the writing. All the characters are extremely one dimensional except maybe Jack Yocke. The dialogue is awfully written and can't Coonts think of any other word for helicopter besides "machine"!? There were numerous plot holes, but I will concede that Coonts made an effort to fix them though somewhat lamely.
This book may be OK for people who have read the other books in the series and have already gotten used to the characters, but if this is going to be the only Coonts book you read, steer clear because it could be your last.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Implausible thriller 12 July 2001
By Rottenberg's rotten book review - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
In "The Red Horsemen", Admiral Jake Grafton travels to post-Soviet Russia to monitor the dismantling of that country's nuclear arsenal. Stephen Coonts, Grafton's creator, brews up a tale of crooked Russians, homocidal CIA agents and black market nukes being sold amid the disintegration of Russia. Unfortunately, the story bogs down quickly when Grafton gets to Russia - mostly because the plot becomes overly complicated, but also due to the sheer implausibility that Coonts inserts into the story - like Grafton's single-handed destruction of a formation of highly agile Su-27 fighters while himslef flying only a hoggish Su-25; the novel's climax has the hero meet Saddam Hussein face-to-face and exact a measure of justice in an ending that seems incredibly pat for Coonts. Even that ending would seem worse had it not capped off a book full of plot twists that don't come together. Coonts' original "Flight of the Intruder" was a great book because it resisted the temptation to become the sort of technothriller that "Horseman" is. Instead, take out "Cuba" in which Coonts returns to form.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars In a word, "WOW!" 8 April 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Jack Yocke wants to make his name big in the Washington Post as a top reporter. He found himself in Russia near a nuclear meltdown. Over a million dead to simply hide the fact of twenty thousand tactical nuclear weapons were missing.

Rear Admiral Jake Grafton, Deputy Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, is dispatched to Moscow. He and his team are to ensure that all the weapons are destroyed before they disappear into a Middle East terrorist pipeline. Grafton soon finds that some American officials want him to fail.

British billionaire Nigel Keren was murdered. His body was found floating in the sea near his yacht. Contacts in Israeli intelligence have proof he was actually the victim of a hit squad from WITHIN the CIA. Grafton soon knows way too much and has been targeted for assassination.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This one deserves 200 STARS! 27 Sep 1998
By Forbeswarren@btinternet.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Stephen Coonts's very best so far! A well-researched, fast-paced and easy-to-read thriller which deals with the story of a nuclear power plant explosion, caused by a renegade general intent on using the disaster to gain him access to a tactical nuclear weapons storage depot, to sell them to Saddam Hussein. Meanwhile, members of the CIA are dropping down like flies in a binary poisoning plot which claims the life of a British newspaper tycoon(a thinly fictionalised Robert Maxwell) and could have been lifted from THE X-FILES. The flying sequences are as ever, as brilliant as Dale Brown with all the autheticity and fully-explained technics you could want, and it's interesting to see Jake Grafton handle Russian fighters for a change! The final scenes in Saudi Arabia and Iraq provide an excellent backdrop to the mission to retrieve the stolen warheads, and the Moscow scenes are also authentic and well-researched. Once again, like Tom Clancy's CARDINAL OF THE KREMLIN, it brought back memories of my visit there. Well done Stephen Coonts, and an ideal starting point for those new to this excellent author's work!
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