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The Hole: Consumer Culture v. 1 [Hardcover]

D Duffy

Price: 14.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

18 July 2008
"The Hole" is a science fiction horror story about the buying and selling of race in America, the simultaneous worship and degradation of African Americans in popular culture, and the tearing down of physical and psychological boundaries.CEO Carla Bonte' wants voodoo to be a national religion - a hyperbolic "hyper voodoo" that uses an advanced technology marketed through a multinational corporation. Papa Legba, voodoo spirit of the crossroads, stands in opposition to hyper voodoo and the consumer culture that propels it.Complete with biting postmodern satire, a visual hip-hop aesthetic, an annotated bibliography, and essays on the academic theory behind the story, "The Hole" stands at the forefront of interdisciplinary education - fearlessly combining African American studies, media and comparative scholarship, horror, science fiction, comedy, and iconic teaching tools.

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; annotated edition edition (18 July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0977868923
  • ISBN-13: 978-0977868926
  • Product Dimensions: 28 x 21.7 x 2.6 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,945,469 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Damian Duffy is editor-in-chief of Eye Trauma Comix and is the writer and letterer of several graphic novels. He has presented extensively at international comics, art, and philosophy conferences and is an active film, music, and television critic. John Jennings is cofounder of Eye Trauma Comix and an assistant professor of graphic design at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a frequent lecturer on visual literacy, popular culture, and visual communication in hip-hop.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Review of 'The Hole' 23 Oct 2008
By Fredricka Holloway - Published on Amazon.com
It seems as though `The Hole' can be read on various different levels. For someone that never really read comic books and only delved into the short strips in a newspaper, I expected that the content within this graphic novel would be a new and inviting experience for me. I quickly learned that I couldn't read this as a simple novel. The leaps back and forth through time and the different character storylines offered more than a basic novel. Plus as a novice comic reader, I had to adjust to taking in the imagery especially of artwork so detailed and graphic. The commonality of the different characters from the very loose and hoe-ish Trina, to the aggressive and angry Curtis though dark and sinister were all representatives of the realities of African American culture and the things we see throughout our communities. Within `The Hole' were representations of the images that we are bombarded with daily and their subliminal messages including the portrayal of the Black Man as violent thugs on tv and in video games (unfortunately barraging our youth), the over sexualized images of Black Women and the references to her defined by her body or demeaned as a [...] or hoe. It's easy to be drawn the details of each image both visually and literally in what the characters are saying or doing, as well as the meaning behind various depiction as in the representation of `Allmart', the Nazi symbol tattooed on Curtis, and the depiction of Voodoo in comparison to Christianity or Islam within our culture. I found myself reading `The Hole' in different modes...at times studying and seeking meaning behind the story as when Trina was swallowed up into Curtis chest and the relevance of drug use. Still at times (as when reading a basic novel) empathizing and just feeling the emotion of the story and anticipating what would happen next like in the case of young Trina wanting to spend quality time with her father and his shopping spree not being a substitute for him being there. When she walked in on seeing her father smoked up/on fire, you couldn't help but wonder about her character but still relate to the reality of how our young girls are impacted by the lack of affection or presence by their fathers and what results when they become adults. This book addresses so many issues from religion to war, the pushing of pharmaceutical drugs to medicate so-called human illnesses (ADA, etc), sex, and race. In reading this book, you can't help but complete it with a feeling that you have to re-read it to find the next level of meaning to what you just read. I don't think you can read this book just for the comic story, or you won't like it and will miss a lot and yet still the book at times can be overwhelming making you wonder did I really understand. Overall, `The Hole' can take you out of your comfort zone with the dark, sexual, and complexity of images and substance and it challenges you to delve deeper, which to me is a pleasant surprise from graphic novel.
5.0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT! a very in depth portrayal of consumerism and African diasporic culture. 25 April 2012
By Chenelle Massey - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
An excellent read. First of all the story is compelling and clever. The use of the african god Legba to represent the cultural appropriation of African / African-American culture was extremely well done. I found myself drawn into the lives of Trina and Curtis. The artwork is excellent, the imagery and symbolism in this book allows the reader to get many interpretations of this reading. I can't wait for volume 2.
4.0 out of 5 stars Hold On to Your Chair ... It's a SMART Graphic Novel! 6 May 2009
By s.5 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Intense, thoughtful, thought provoking, complex, rewarding, engaging ... I couldn't put this book down. I've read fifty or sixty graphic novels, and none of them are as thoughtful as this book. Hole as I understand it is about race and identity, about hate, about the African-American body, about consumer culture (as the title implies), and powerfully about stereotypes. One cool thing about the book is that it persistently challenges stereotypes by adopting and inverting them. And check out the art in this book: it's unconventional, evolving as the book goes along, and the kind of stuff that rewards looking for a long, long time. This is certainly a graphic graphic novel, so be ready for some intense content. But for anyone interested in bodies, in particular, this is one heck of a study of the body as a place for writing, change, and identity development. A very imaginative book ... when is someone gonna come along and make a movie of this one???
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