The Complete Pat Hobby Stories (Annotated) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading The Complete Pat Hobby Stories (Annotated) on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Pat Hobby Stories [Paperback]

F. Scott Fitzgerald
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: 8.46
Price: 6.53 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
You Save: 1.93 (23%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Saturday, 19 April? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 1.99  
Hardcover 14.99  
Paperback 6.53  
Audio, CD, Audiobook, Unabridged 12.84  
Audio Download, Unabridged 14.85 or Free with Audible.co.uk 30-day free trial
Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Book Description

18 Dec 1995
The Pat Hobby Stories by F Scott Fitzgerald A collection of stories about unscrupulous film writer Pat Hobby, a relic from the early days of Hollywood, looking for success in the changing world of the movies. F. Scott Fitzgerald's collection paints a comic portrait of a man unwilling to accept his fate as a thing of the past, an artless, insensitive writer suffering as the decades leave silent film behind. Hobby keeps himself in a world which doesn't respect its elders, particularly not when they are as lazy and scheming as he. Listings: Pat Hobby's Christmas Wish A Man In The Way 'Boil Some Water - Lots of It' Teamed with Genius Pat Hobby and Orson Welles Pat Hobby's Secret Pat Hobby, Putative Father The Homes of the Stars Pat Hobby Does His Bit Pat Hobby's Preview No Harm Trying A Patriotic Short On The Trail of Pat Hobby Fun in an Artist's Studio Two Old-Timers Mightier than the Sword Pat Hobby's College Days
--This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall & IBD; 1st Scribner Paperback Fiction Ed edition (18 Dec 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684804425
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684804422
  • Product Dimensions: 20.4 x 13.3 x 1.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 767,233 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

F. Scott Fitzgerald was born in 1896 in St Paul, Minnesota, and went to Princeton University which he left in 1917 to join the army. Fitzgerald was said to have epitomised the Jazz Age, an age inhabited by a generation he defined as 'grown up to find all Gods dead, all wars fought, all faiths in man shaken'.

In 1920 he married Zelda Sayre. Their destructive relationship and her subsequent mental breakdowns became a major influence on his writing. Among his publications were five novels, This Side of Paradise, The Great Gatsby, The Beautiful and Damned, Tender is the Night and The Love of the Last Tycoon (his last and unfinished work): six volumes of short stories and The Crack-Up, a selection of autobiographical pieces.

Fitzgerald died suddenly in 1940. After his death The New York Times said of him that 'He was better than he knew, for in fact and in the literary sense he invented a "generation" ... he might have interpreted them and even guided them, as in their middle years they saw a different and nobler freedom threatened with destruction.'


Product Description

About the Author

F Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940) was an American author of novels and short stories, whose works are considered the paradigm writings of his time. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
1 star
0
3.5 out of 5 stars
3.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous assessment of growing old in showbiz! 28 Feb 1997
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
If you read "The Great Gatsby" because you were required to in school, you may want to refresh your memory on reading Fitzgerald for enjoyment. By reading "The Pat Hobby Stories," not only will you reintroduce yourself to the world as Fitzgerald saw it, but you will see the many parallels there are between the past and present in entertainment.
Fitzgerald follows an aging screenwriter, Pat Hobby, through his few successes and his several rejections by the Hollywood community. This is a "Death of a Salesman" in showbiz!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2.0 out of 5 stars The Pat Hobby Stories 10 Dec 2011
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Granted how good the best of Scott Fitzgerald is, I was anxious to read The Pat Hobby Stories as well. I knew, of course, that they reflected his period in Hollywood. But having read them, I have to say that they are very slackly written, and throw nothing like the same light on Hollywood as, say, William Goldman's books. They don't have any great style, or insights, or surprises.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  13 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hollywood Without The Glamour and Glitz 17 Oct 2001
By Christine Lynn Jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Pat Hobby, once a successful Hollywood screenwriter, is nothing more than a pathetic has been. Broke, tired, and scrambling to find work, Pat takes on some unconventional methods to fill his pockets and put his name back on the big screen. But things don't turn out as smooth as Pat hopes. After all, as Pat himself repeatedly states, "I'm just a writer," and, "it's a dog's life." Pat's antics backfire and in almost every story he is left with nothing but humiliation.
The Pat Hobby stories were written between 1939 and 1940, when Fitzgerald himself was struggling to keep afloat in Hollywood. Fitzgerald paints the Hollywood scene as cold, calculating, and manipulative. A place where kissing up is more important than the quality of your talents, a place where the writer gets no respect, and a place that most likely today harbors the same attitude that Fitzgerald so deftly described in his final days.
In reading the Pat Hobby Stories, one can feel Fitzgerald's own sense of poor self-worth, despair, and hopelessness. Yet ironically, a twist of dark humor is thrown into the stories, evoking in the reader an ambiguous response of laughing at Pat Hobby while pitying him at the same time. This collection is not only entertaining and easy to read, but is one that will give you broader insight into the late great F. Scott Fitzgerald.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More Heartbreak from the Dream Dump 15 Aug 2003
By Jeffrey K. Tyzzer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Most people know F. Scott Fitzgerald as one of the deans of the lost generation and an icon of the jazz-age. But toward the end of his life, in the late 1930's, Fitzgerald was also a writer for MGM studios, and these stories represent vividly and tragically this period of his life.

Through the eyes of Fitzgerald's Pat Hobby, Hollywood hack writer, we see a different side of golden age tinseltown, where an extraordinary number of talented writers and artists migrated to in the 1930s and '40s, only to butt their heads against militant mediocrity and the "studio system." As an archetype, Pat Hobby stands in for them brilliantly.

Also recommended: What Makes Sammy Run? by Budd Schulberg, The Day of the Locust by Nathanael West, and The Player by Michael Tolkin.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars If You're Curious About Fitzgerald, Read This Book 17 Jan 2009
By Andrew Corsa - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
While I enjoyed these stories, they don't come close, in quality, to much of Fitzgerald's earlier work. While some of these stories are funny, and while some possess excellent sentences and great, interesting images, none of them shine like "The Great Gatsby" or "The Diamond As Big As The Ritz." When I first finished this book, I found it hard to imagine that the same man who wrote "Gatsby" also wrote this collection of humorous stories about a truly pitiful Hollywood writer.

Prompted by my new fascination with Fitzgerald, I read Turnbull's biography of Fitzgerald title Scott Fitzgerald, and it was excellent. And now, in light of this biography and my experiences reading Fitzgerald, I'm convinced that this book helps to illustrate Fitzgerald's tremendous, personal transformation. In between Gatsby and Pat Hobby, Fitzgerald's life fell apart. His wife had experienced breakdowns and needed psychiatric care, and Fitzgerald himself was destroyed by alcoholism. His personal life fell apart, and he even tried to commit suicide. Fitzgerald, himself, frequently spoke and wrote about his "crack up." And this book, "The Pat Hobby Stories," reads as if it were written by a literary genius whose world had broken apart.

Further, this book seems to be reflective of Fitzgerald's personal life and feelings. Around the time he wrote it, he was working at Hollywood, where he kept getting shifted from script to script. He was discontent, saying: "It's so barren out here. I don't feel anything out here," (Turnbull 1962, 293), and he described Hollywood as "a dump . . . A hideous town, pointed up by the insulting gardens of its rich, full of the human spirit at a new low of debasement" (Turnbull 1962, 317). This book, "The Pat Hobby Stories," which focuses on the silliness and pathetic-ness of Pat Hobby and his embarrassing adventures in Hollywood, probably captures at least a part of Fitzgerald's feelings for himself and the environment in which he lived.

Ultimately, if you find Fitzgerald interesting, then I recommend reading this book - because it really says something about him. But if you just want to read a great book, I recommend you look elsewhere.

---

Two final, fun notes. First, Fitzgerald once wrote that Hollywood was "a strange conglomeration of a few excellent overtired men making pictures and as dismal a crowd of fakes and hacks at the bottom as you can imagine" (Turnbull 1962, 293). This is a neat quote, when seen in relation to Fitzgerald's fictional creation - Pat Hobby, the dismal hack. Second, Turnbull includes two descriptive sentences which relate, amusingly, to one of the Hobby stories: "At the same time [Fitzgerald] was trying to make gin a substitute for energy, and each week his secretary collected the bottles and disposed of them lest they be noticed in the rubbish" (Turnbull 1962, 298). After reading this book, you might see why this is interesting.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fitzgerald's Pat Hobby 30 Aug 2006
By A reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Fitzgerald's early fiction often deals with the case of the young man who harbors elaborate and perhaps outlandish aspirations for success. In the Pat Hobby stories -- Fitzgerald's last published work -- we see depicted a 49-year-old man whose dreams have collided with a bleak reality. Years after his brief heyday as a well-paid film writer in the days of silent films, he is now quite simply a failure.

And yet Pat Hobby is a unique type of loser, one who sympathizes with the bosses and moguls rather than his fellow downtrodden peers at the bottom of the totem pole. Witness for example the startling scene in which Hobby, with righteous indignation, takes a lunch tray to attack an extra who had the audacity to sit at the VIP table in the studio canteen and refused to move. This scene offers a fascinating insight into Fitzgerald's own psychology, if one views Hobby as an alter ego for the author, while also raising broader questions about American culture.

"A Patriotic Short" is the story which best encapsulates these questions, as Hobby bitterly reflects on the contrast between his illustrious past, when he had a house with a swimming pool that was once admired by the President himself, and his current menial assignment editing a lame film script. Here, in just a few pages, Fitzgerald deftly weaves together the American obsessions with celebrity, the presidency, and of course the swimming pool, into a commentary on the idea of success itself.

Any mention of a swimming pool by Fitzgerald evokes the sad fate of Jay Gatsby. And though we might find Hobby a less sympathetic character than Gatsby, in many ways he represents the other side of the same debased coin. Both are tragic figures, equally unable to fulfill their dreams of glamour, and perhaps both equally the victims of the American ethos of success.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous assessment of growing old in showbiz! 1 Mar 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
If you read "The Great Gatsby" because you were required to in school, you may want to refresh your memory on reading Fitzgerald for enjoyment. By reading "The Pat Hobby Stories," not only will you reintroduce yourself to the world as Fitzgerald saw it, but you will see the many parallels there are between the past and present in entertainment.
Fitzgerald follows an aging screenwriter, Pat Hobby, through his few successes and his several rejections by the Hollywood community. This is a "Death of a Salesman" in showbiz!
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xb6da4ea0)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback