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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on 3 October 2006
The central thought of the book is very strong: that it is easier and more effective to tell stories about brands if those stories are already, in some way, familiar. Using twelve archetypes, the authors discuss how exploiting certain archetypal behaviours and traits strengthen a brand's grip on the "collective unconscious" and makes for a clearer positioning and more "appropriate" advertising. This is good stuff: it makes sense that in an attention economy, marketers use whatever anchors they can to secure a place for a brand in their targets' minds. Unfortunately, the examples and illustrations used are often muddled, or just plain wrong, which has the effect of making the central argument seem less impressive. There's also a bit of laziness in some of the examples: is it really helpful to describe Harvard as "A Sage Brand"? That's its role, not its identity, surely... So: a good theme and central idea, that's weakened somewhat by lazy execution. Read it for the summaries and main outline, but I would suggest that you find your own examples and case studies, especially if you are working outside the USA.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 21 July 2011
Having read and rated Carole Pearson's earlier work on archetypes,I was intrigued by her approach to using them in marketing.The book is a large,hardback which does not deliver on its promise to improve marketing through knowing and understanding one's predominant archetype.What it does do is to lay out the most common archetypes then provide examples of companies using them as their brand.What it fails to do is to suggest practical ways to do this for oneself.For eaxample,I know that my predominant archetype(at least in business )is that of Magician but I'm left asking :so what does that mean? I already know that my clients are creatives who make their own mind up and don't want hype.
Lots of words but litle substance.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 28 February 2011
The idea behind this book - that you can think about brands, using the Jungian idea of archetypes - is powerful. Brands do appear to us as personalities and it's useful to consider just what type of personality is being conveyed through them, and if we're responsible for brand marketing, to consider how well our marketing programmes and initiatives align with the essence of the brand we're trying to put across.

But the thinking behind this book is fuzzy in the extreme. I see no research at all to back up the categorization that's being used. There are some similarities in the way this is approached and the way Cameron and Quinn approached their work on Competing Values. The difference is that Cameron and Quinn's framework is bedded in data that talk to the concepts they use. So, while a marketer or OD person can used their thinking to inform their work, it'd be pretty difficult to take The Hero and The Outlaw into a serious business.
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on 20 May 2011
Great book! Gave me a deeper understanding on how great brands are built. A must read for every marketer who wants to make his job better. It helps you identify the brand core values and connect them to potential customers, also position the brand on a much solid, deeper basis.
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on 29 September 2013
They are onto something here, it answers so much of the reasons that you may have struggled with a positioning statement, or a brand message before. So often you just can't put your finger on it, why it doesn't work, or where to start. This gives creativity good structure.
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on 6 October 2010
This book enables a different approach to promotional communication. By allowing us to work with the archetypes on an easy and practical manner we can achieve a deeper degree of understanding of advertising and brand positioning.
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on 10 August 2013
We used this as a reference source in a recent marketing exercise we were undertaking. It was thought provoking and useful.
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10 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on 5 February 2008
It continues to amaze me that books like this still get published and, worse, read.
It's lazy, ill-researched and just plain wrong. There isn't a competent sociologist alive who would accept this rubbish as coming anywhere near the role of brands in society.
Ho hum...I'll have to write me own book I suppose.
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