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The Harvest Paperback – 23 Jun 1997


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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Belhue Press,U.S.; 1 edition (23 Jun. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 096271237X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0962712371
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 14.6 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,113,691 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Originally from Savannah, Georgia, Perry Brass grew up in the 1950s and 1960s, equal parts Southern, Jewish, economically impoverished, and very much gay. To escape the South's violent homophobia, he hitchhiked at seventeen from Savannah to San Francisco, California (over 3,000 miles)--an adventure, he recalls, that was "like Mark Twain with drag queens." He has published sixteen books and been a finalist six times for Lambda Literary Awards in poetry, gay science fiction and fantasy, and spirituality and religion. His novels "Warlock" and "Carnal Sacraments" both received "Ippy" Independent Publisher Awards from as Best Gay and Lesbian Book. "Carnal Sacraments" was also a finalist for a Best Book of the Year Award from ForeWord magazine.

His newest book, "King of Angels, A Novel About the Genesis of Identity and Belief," set in Savannah, GA, in 1963, the year of J.F.K.'s assassination, has been compared "To Kill A Mocking Bird," and has received rapturous reviews from readers and the press alike. His previous book, "The Manly Art of Seduction," lauded in many reviews, received a Gold Medal IPPY Award as Best Gay and Lesbian Non-Fiction book in a very crowded category. Although "The Manly Art of Seduction" has become the "go-to" book about male-on-male relationships, it has also attacted a universal readership because of its humanity, humor, and approach to actually understanding men and how they approach intimacy.

He has been involved in the gay movement since 1969, when he co-edited Come Out!, the world's first gay liberation newspaper. In 1972, with two friends he started the Gay Men's Health Project Clinic, the first clinic for gay men on the East Coast, still surviving as New York's Callen-Lorde Community Health Center. In 1984, his play Night Chills, one of the first plays to deal with the AIDS crisis, won a Jane Chambers International Gay Playwriting Award.

Brass's numerous collaborations with composers include the poetry for "All the Way Through Evening," a five-song cycle set by the late Chris DeBlasio; "The Angel Voices of Men" set by Ricky Ian Gordon, commissioned by the Dick Cable Fund for the New York City Gay Men's Chorus, which featured it on its Gay Century Songbook CD; "Three Brass Songs" set by Fred Hersch; "Five 'Russian' Lyrics," set by Christopher Berg, commissioned by Positive Music; and "Waltzes for Men," also commissioned by the DCF for the NYC Gay Men's Chorus, set by Craig Carnahan. His latest musical collaboration,"The Restless Yearning Towards My Self," set by opera composer Paula Kimper, was commissioned by Downtown Music.

Perry Brass is an accomplished reader and authority on gender subjects, gay relationships, and the history and literature of the movement towards GLBT equality. He has taught numerous workshops and classes in writing and publishing fiction, and on the hidden roots of an eternal gay culture. He lives in the Riverdale section of "da Bronx," part of New York City, with his life partner of 32 years, but travels widely in Europe and other parts of the world. He can be reached personally through his website, www.perrybrass.com.



Product Description

From the Publisher

"Hart escapes. How can any gay man resist him?" London
Belhue Press sends in some recent excerpts of reviews of The Harvest.

"Brass has a splendid gift for storytelling, and while The Harvest is my first encounter with his work, I know I'd like to read some of his other writing. . . . Savor his sense of place and enjoy those occasional turns of phrase which are the mark of great storytelling. Brass has also peopled his novel with remarkable characters who are full-bodied and flavor this tale, from the fast-talking bar owner to the cult of "True Christians" to Andy Dixon, the Corps policeman whjo enjoys threesomes in the shower." Steven Lavigne in Lavender, Nov. 7, 1997, Minneapolis, MN

"Perry Brass is a man of many literary talents and his writings run the gamut from poetry (Sex-charge) to the heavy-duty Smoky George gayrotic stories (collected in Works). However, if his published works are any indications, Brass's specialty is science fiction. In the 'Ki Trilogy' — Mirage, Circles, and Albert or The Book of Man — Brass created an alternate world of men-lovin' men at odds with our own homophobic society. But good as the Ki books are, Brass clearly outdid himself in The Harvest, his latest and best.... In George Nader's 'Chrome,' the hero dared to love a robot. In The Harvest (a vastly superior novel) Chris Turner falls in love with a vacco, Hart 246043, who realizes his humanity and seeks to escape his fate.... Though cloning is still in its infancy, Brass takes it to its logical (?) conclusion, not to a world of test-tube Einsteins and Ghandis, but to a world where humans are created in order to be destroyed. The Harvest looks at what could happen when science goes amuck and humans allow the almighty State (or almighty Corporation) to control their lives. It is a cautionary tale, and an exciting one." Jesse Monteagudo on GayToday, Dec. 1, 1997

"What The Harvest does have going for it is very hot sexual scenes, decent writing, well-executed and maintaining dramatic suspense throughout the book. Brass does not shy away from sexuality, but at the same time avoids getting pornographic. . . . If you like well-written gay science fiction, you'll appreciate Perry Brass's The Harvest." International Leatherman.

"Perry Brass is a hero to gay horror fans and you will not be disappointed by The Harvest. Set in an all too familiar future, one all-powerful corporation runs America and guarantees health, happiness, and prosperity. Tranplants are the norm, but the organs are removed from laboratory-produced humans. Hart escapes and how can any self-respecting gay man resist him?" Jeffrey Baines in Gay Times, London.

From the Author

Important! About the future of cloning and gay relationships
Tired of Corporate gay clone novels about refrigerated "ice box fruits"? The Harvest cuts deeper, into the heart of a strange American future, where gay relationships will be just another part of the Corporate State, where a subset of humans will be cloned and raised to be sources of human body-part material, and where class lines will be drawn in concrete behind a public relations "mask" of universal opportunity. This is a sexy, moving, exciting novel about a future around the corner, but it's time to see it. Readers of the "Ki" novels ("Mirage," "Circles," and "Albert") will find this one just as exciting and memorable.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 July 1997
Format: Paperback
As a relatively new reader of sci-fi, I have found Perry Brass has a way of keeping the reader on the edge of his seat. His trilogy of Mirage, followed by the sequel Circles and concluded with Arthur were beautifully written, as well as erotically stimulating and his imagination unique. He continues his ability to stimulate, excite, and scare the pants off his reader with his book The Harvest. It's not a book one can review in a few lines, it's a book that needs to be read to be appreciated.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
flawed and depressing 5 Oct. 2006
By Furio - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This will probably be my last Perry Brass novel. Full of basic flaws such as continuos flashbacks and explanations of states of mind, it still retains a good sense of story building and telling. But what kind of story are we faced with? A very depressing one, and the only way one can bear such a thing is through an amazingly good writing, which is not the case here.

Halfway between horror and sf the plot is based on two wrong assumption: such a society as it is described could not care less about the sexual orientation of its members; a society owning such refined genic techniques would certainly not need to breed human-like beings to get spare organs.

I am under the impression that while writing this novel Mr Brass wanted to highlight how de-humanizing our society is becoming and is likely to become even more. Nice try, but a try nonetheless.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Great disappointment 28 Nov. 2010
By Joe L Clark - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is my first Perry Brass novel and it will be my last. The writing is mediocre and there is not a single sympathetic character in the first half of the book. I say "the first half of the book" because that is all the time I will give it and that time was wasted.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A Page-Turner! So Many Layers! 11 Mar. 2008
By Jane - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the third Perry Brass Book I have read and loved!
Set some years into the future, laboratory-produced humanoids called vaccos, are created and kept for their body parts. 'The Corporation' controls everyone's lives and Joshua Devereaux controls The Corporation.
He adopts a 15 year old young man,Chris Turner, who was born on the wrong side of town, abused by his father, a hustler of old men, a car thief and finally is incarcerated in 'the hole.'
The mega-wealthy Joshua Devereaux, gives Chris a new home and a new name,Edgar. He also sexually abuses him.
Chris/Edgar now has everything money can buy...except real love and a permanent relationship.Something his adopted-father has forbade him.
Chris crosses paths one night with a man who begs for his help. He will save this man-only to find he is a 'vacco'. Chris?Edgar's indolent lifestyle given to him,suddenly takes on a meaning,and purpose.
He bonds with Hart 256043.
Together, Hart and Chris will do everything possible for their mutual survival,their mutual love.But the cost will be dear.
They have something that no man,no corporation,no Joshua Devereaux will put asunder.
erotic, unbelievable,exciting,
3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
"Couldn't put the sucker down." (The Harvest, Perry Brass) 20 July 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As a relatively new reader of sci-fi, I have found Perry Brass has a way of keeping the reader on the edge of his seat. His trilogy of Mirage, followed by the sequel Circles and concluded with Arthur were beautifully written, as well as erotically stimulating and his imagination unique. He continues his ability to stimulate, excite, and scare the pants off his reader with his book The Harvest. It's not a book one can review in a few lines, it's a book that needs to be read to be appreciated
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