Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 30 November 2014
This is no time for quibbling. Given the preposterous praise being heaped on Caroline Moorehead’s inept and scurrilous rival account of the rescue mission that occurred in and around Le Chambon—three cheers for Peter Grose’s careful account of those events! (For more information on the problems with Moorehead’s book please see http://www.chambon.org/moorehead.htm.)

Not only does Grose honestly tell the story without false claims to puncturing non-existent myths, he does so in a lively and very readable book, telling a story that one can follow—and that one enjoys following. Needless to say, I am also grateful, especially given Moorehead’s self-serving and malicious attack on my film, for Grose's kind words about my own feature documentary about the rescue effort to which I may owe my life, “Weapons of the Spirit.” It will be joining the fray in 2015 when it is re-released in a new, remastered 25th-anniversary edition, premiering in London on Jan. 24.

Peter Grose and I don’t see eye-to-eye on everything, but our differences seem especially minor in light of the chasm separating Caroline Moorehead’s view of what happened in Le Chambon with the view of those who actually experienced themselves what happened there. This book, wonderfully titled “A Good Place To Hide” in Australia and the United States, is preferable in every respect.

Pierre Sauvage
President, Chambon Foundation
review image
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 4 August 2014
A moving and thoughtful account of how normal people can do extraordinary things. Happily, the detailed and meticulous research doesn't overshadow the individual stories and you get a real sense of what it must have been like both for the refugees but also for the villagers. If I had one criticism it would be that the narrative is almost too modest for the story it is telling. The characters may not assess themselves as either extraordinary or heroic, but a quick look at any current news channel tells you that tolerance and the determination to protect the vulnerable from oppression is still very much in short supply. We could all learn a lot from the example set in Le Chambon and the surrounding villages. A part of history I'm glad I now know about.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 19 September 2014
This is a vividly told story of a remarkable group of people in a small area in central France who decided to protect people threatened by Nazi policy - mostly Jews, many of them children, but not only them. It's a fantastic read; really gripping and full of wonderful original material, much of it taken from recent interviews and contemporary accounts.

Some interesting specifics: firstly, there were a large number of Russians in the German army who then, naturally, didn't prove to be the most loyal members of the army. Secondly, many Frenchmen were being conscripted into working in factories in Germany, so a number of them disappeared into the undergrowth, thereby providing a good source of resistants. This book describes the development of the Resistance well; including the fact that it was very much accelerated towards the end of the war when it was becoming clear which side was going to win.

One of the most interesting aspects of the story is the question of blind eyes being turned. This is analysed as being a combination of different things, including the rugged geography of the area, which obviously helped considerably. But Protestantism is an interesting element of it, as is the shortage of police and general surveillance manpower. Presumably it was worth all the locals (including gendarmes) sitting on the fence to some extent, given they had to live together after the war.

Altogether a fascinating story, well told.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 20 November 2014
How exciting to read accurate history told in such a way that it could almost be a novel !
Peter Grose is an excellent writer. With great empathy and understanding, he takes us through WW II on the remote Plateau Vivarais -Lignon (also called La Montagne Protestante), situated mostly in the department of Haute -Loire in Central France. As he progressed in his research and interviewed witnesses, he developed a remarkable feeling for the local history. Each chapter stimulates our curiosity and makes the reader wonder: and what will happen next? Do I have time to read another chapter?
The Greatest Escape ( also called A Good place to Hide) introduces us to a variety of special characters, all with different backgrounds, all very private and yet they all worked together in a secret underground network. Many rescuers were Protestants , but others simply did what seemed right to them. Others were catholic, agnostic or Jewish. Some were members of the armed resistance. Twelve villages were involved and Le Chambon -sur- Lignon became a hub of activities. How many Jews and other refugees were hidden on the Plateau? No one really knows...
But I better stop here and let you discover for yourselves this special story told with zest and humour for everyone to enjoy.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 10 December 2014
“A Good Place to Hide” by Peter Grose is an excellent, credible, accurate and very readable history of what took place in Le Chambon sur Lignon, Haute Loire, and other localities in that area during World War II. The story of how this Protestant community, once persecuted itself and now giving Jewish refugees protection, is told with heartfelt warmth. I was in Le Chambon myself from mid-August to late December 1942 and knew personally some of the individuals who are mentioned. I owe my life to the compassion and courage of the people who sheltered and hid me and then helped me to escape.

Walter Jakubowski
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 12 September 2014
A thoughtful and incisive accounting of the actions of a small area of France that did more than most to save as many refugees as possible from the murderous regimes that threatened them. Well written and well researched and entertaining if a little sad at times. Heartily recommend!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 23 October 2014
A great example of detailed research written in an interesting and compelling way
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 10 October 2014
A fantastic book which made me realise the sacrifice that so many people went through for the benefit of others. Thank you Peter Grose for writing this book I found it wonderful.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 14 November 2014
Fantastic book it illustrates how much good there was and still is in this world
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 11 January 2015
A cracking good read, containing much inspirational new information for this old guy who already had a good number of books about France in WW 11 under his belt.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.