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The Great Escape Double CD

45 customer reviews

Price: £12.88 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Blur
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£12.88 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Music

Image of album by Blur

Photos

Image of Blur

Biography

Blur are an English alternative rock band. Formed in London in 1989 as Seymour, the group consists of singer Damon Albarn, guitarist Graham Coxon, bassist Alex James and drummer Dave Rowntree. Blur's debut album Leisure (1991) incorporated the sounds of Madchester and shoegazing. Following a stylistic change—influenced by English guitar pop groups such as The Kinks, The Beatles and ... Read more in Amazon's Blur Store

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Frequently Bought Together

The Great Escape + Parklife + Modern Life Is Rubbish
Price For All Three: £20.95

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Product details

  • Audio CD (30 July 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Double CD
  • Label: EMI Catalogue
  • ASIN: B007SAKU14
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 73,439 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
  • Sample this album Title - Artist (Sample)
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Product Description

Blur's fourth album, The Great Escape was originally released in 1995 and was the first Blur album to crack the US charts, as well as going triple platinum in the UK. This special edition is remastered, repackaged and includes a bonus disc with some previously unreleased material.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 May 2001
Format: Audio CD
This was the album that very nearly broke the back of Blur in their native Britain. Released at the same time as Oasis' ''(What's The Story) Morning Glory)'', which sold considerably more copies, Blur became victims of the age old British adage of putting someone on a pedastal so you can knock them down. Suddenly, lead singer Damon Albarn couldn't walk down the street without someone yelling the latest Oasis tune in his ear. It was the mother of all backlashes. Which is strange, because ''The Great Escape'' is a superb album. Fizzling with musical invention, (the ethereal, nightmarish guitars on ''He Thought Of Cars'') and lyrical gems, (''They're on the leather sofa, they're on the patio./And when the fun is over, watch themselves on video'' from ''Stereotypes''), it was a noted progression from ''Parklife''. Guitarist Graham Coxon established himself as the finest of his generation, bending his sounds around Albarns songs in much the same way as a painter colours in the white gaps of a rough sketch (especially on the melancholic ''Best Days''). The grandiose ''The Universal'' is a genuine throat lumper, swelling with Bacharian strings. And ''Entertain Me'' revisits the stomping disco beat of ''Girls And Boys'', matching a cracking tune with yearning lyrics. It's no surprise to learn that The Smiths were idols of Albarn and co.There's even the token punk song, (''Globe Alone''), that Blur always throw on to their records. It's a measure of Blurs self belief that the ensuing backlash following ''The Great Escape''s release didn't break them. And it's a sign of genuis that they went on to make even better records. Because this is an excellent album.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Sept. 2000
Format: Audio CD
Although I can understand why so many people slate this album, I can't agree with them. Sure, it may be somewhat overproduced, but LISTEN to the album instead of going along with the majority and you'll discover a much-maligned classic. Of course there are poor tracks (TOPMAN and and Dan Abnormal for me), but there are also some of the bands best ever tracks (The Universal, Stereotypes, Best Days and the stunning He Thought of Cars).
This album was recorded at the peak of Britpop, just as Parklife when ballastic, and when released, got much more favourable releases than Oasis' What's the Story? It was only when the backlash kicked in towards Christmas '95 that everyone started slating the album. Perhaps the melancholy feel and depressing lyrics (even the Country House lyrics are depressing when you listen to them!) are hard for many to listen to, whilst Oasis' required no real effort on the listener's part.
One day this album will be given the credit it deserves.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Arthur on 29 Nov. 2010
Format: Audio CD
I always liked Blur and had been meaning to purchase all 7 albums and see for myself the wonderful life of Blur. First off as I read the reviews of this album it seems like no one has an opinion and everyone follows whatever the negative reviews say to fit and say that it is Blur at there worst. Are you joking honestly this album is slated because of what a few people think it is not as good as Parklife. Who cares do we really need a Parklife no,Blur needed to move on and thank god they did.There are some pure excellent songs on this album but no one seems to notice and it's a shame. In some ways I really like this album and prefer this to other releases of there's but the negativity hype surrounding this release will sadly never go away I think if you are reading this and you hate the album because your a sheep if i could reach out of my computer screen and slap you with this very album on CD i will be more than happy to.

Charmless Man and Country House are classics and it is easy to see that because these do stick out compared to the other tracks but they have all the good bit of magic to them. I can't stress enough that if you are reading the reviews that talk garbage get this album and see for yourselves.

For the price you are paying i must say just click to purchase when you just about to buy a few blur albums and see for yourself. It is defiantly worth having and thinking about it. Honestly this album makes you think in so many ways..
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Christopher J. Welch on 12 Mar. 2008
Format: Audio CD
Following the huge success of the timeless Parklife, Blur were riding high as the hybrow kings of Britpop. They were as brilliant live as they had become in the studio and frontman Damon Albarn was the Uk's most recognised pop star (alongside the Oasis brother's).
So it's no surprise that soon after the band released the Great Escape, and it's lead single 'Country House', in 1995 that the vultures had began to circle. Blur suffered a backlash that would see them abandon Britpop entirely in favour of a far more extreme and experimental sound. In the long run this probaly saved the band from imploding and certainly got the critics back on side.
So how does The Great Escape stand up today ? Surprisingly well. The perky 'Country House' hit the number one spot but is probably one of the bands weakest singles. 'Charmless Man' and 'Stereotypes' extended Blur's run of smart, melodic and catchy pop hits whilst 'The Universal' still sounds as brittle and brilliant as it always did. There are enough hooks, clever lyrics and tight inventive arrangements (and ken Livingstone !) on The Great Escape to make the album one of the bands most accessible. It isn't anywhere near as consistent as Parklife but neither is it the fractured, over reaching dissaster that history records.
Apparently this is still a favourite of guitarist Graham Coxon who claims The Great Escape as Blur's great lost record. He may well be right.

cw
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