Start reading The Good Room on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Good Room: Why we ended up in a debtors' prison - and how we can break free
 
 

The Good Room: Why we ended up in a debtors' prison - and how we can break free [Kindle Edition]

David McWilliams
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £8.99
Kindle Price: £4.99 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: £4.00 (44%)
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £4.99  
Paperback £8.50  
Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deal: Up to 70% off
Each day we unveil a new book deal at a specially discounted price--for that day only. Learn more about the Kindle Daily Deal or sign up for the Kindle Daily Deal Newsletter to receive free e-mail notifications about each day's deal.


Product Description

Review

McWilliams has a great knack for bringing a complex economics story to life. He is also funny. In economics, that's a rare and persuasive combination. (Stephanie Flanders Irish Times)

A gifted and often courageous polemicist who has done more to popularize the debate about economics in Ireland than anyone else (Irish Independent)

McWilliams makes a compelling argument for the need for a different approach to Irish and European economic management ... [A] realistic, pragmatic call for innovative policies that take account of proven economic theory (Sunday Business Post)

Product Description

A forensic, entertaining polemic from the author of The Pope's Children.



Ireland is deeply in debt, beholden to the IMF, the EU and the bond markets. Its economy is frozen, and years of austerity are ahead.



It didn't have to be this way - and it doesn't have to be this way. In The Good Room, David McWilliams, who spotted the dangers of the Irish property bubble and imbalances within the eurozone at a time when other commentators were cheerleading the boom, explains the bizarre economics behind Ireland's current predicament, and illuminates a different path for the country. He illustrates the consequences of debt and austerity for ordinary Irish people and explains why austerity can't work. And he shows that history offers numerous useful models for Irish recovery - provided we open our eyes to them.



Economics is about people like you. The Pope's Children was the book that connected the dots between economics and daily life in Ireland during the boom years. The Good Room does the same for the Ireland of the bust, and is - in its call for a completely different approach - an even more urgent and necessary work.



'McWilliams has a great knack for bringing a complex economics story to life. He is also funny. In economics, that's a rare and persuasive combination.' Stephanie Flanders, Irish Times



'A gifted and often courageous polemicist who has done more to popularize the debate about economics in Ireland than anyone else' Irish Independent



'McWilliams makes a compelling argument for the need for a different approach to Irish and European economic management ... [A] realistic, pragmatic call for innovative policies that take account of proven economic theory' Sunday Business Post



David McWilliams is Ireland's leading popular economist, and a columnist for the Irish Independent and the Sunday Business Post. He is the author of the bestsellers The Pope's Children, The Generation Game, and Follow the Money.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 406 KB
  • Print Length: 260 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (25 Oct 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00936RTME
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #117,054 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.


Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
4.2 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Good Room - David McWilliams 26 Oct 2012
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
A great read and one that matters. David McWilliams manages to combine a light-read novel with providing insights into the current economic crisis in Ireland and the rest of Europe. The two of them are cleverly intertwined, emphasizing the so obvious but often forgotten fact that economy is about real people. We meet Olivia Veckers, a young, popular history teacher. She loves her job but doesn't agree with the Leaving Cert system, encouraging her students to think for themselves rather than regurgitate textbook lines. We follow her all through her pregnancy of her second child, meeting many colourful relatives, friends and colleagues on the way. Like so many others, she's struggling with her mortgage of her house in Wicklow, bought during the boom. Her husband lost his job, her own working hours are reduced and their mortgage interest has gone up, all in all resulting in their outgoings being much larger than their income. Olivia and Sean talk to the bank to try and negotiate a deal but to no avail. A lawyer-friend offers to help them and together they decide to take on the banks in court.
`The Good Room' was a room many ordinary Irish people used to have, used only when very important people - the doctor, the priest - came to visit. In the good room, everyone pretended. The ordinary people pretended to be more posh than they were, the posh people played along. The Good Room is becoming rare, but its spirit lives on, according to DMW: Irish negotiators in Europe behave like his granny facing the local doctor in her Good Room, `adopting a subservient position desperately clinging on to a notion of respectability. Are we more concerned with the perception of respectability than with reality? Why, when evidently bust, didn't we call it like the Icelanders and tell the creditors where to go?
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very relevant, needed better editing 21 Jan 2013
Format:Paperback
As others have already commmented, a very good commentary on Ireland's current economic problems, written in a homely eady-to-read style. Anyone who follows his blog will already be familiar with many of his arguments.

I felt that the idea of intertwining the economic analysis with the real-life problems of a typical fictional victim of what went wrong with Ireland, didn't always work. Eg, did we really need to know about flatulating in a shop during her pregnancy?

Some concepts were brilliantly explained; other, such as the "discount window" were not explained at all. Using Iceland as an example of how the crisis might better have been solved may be correct; however Argentina, also going through a similar crisis has also tried to stiff its creditors, and is now effectively shut out from the world bond markets. There were also some minor editing errors, for example Belgium does not have the EU's highest national debt, either nominally or as a precentage of its GDP.

Still, all in all, a good read.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyed the read, not so sure of the theories 20 Mar 2013
By Greg
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I've given it four stars because it's fun to read and up-to-the-minute and a bit controversial.
I'm not so sure I enjoy his economic suggestions. They seem to be so against the mainstream that I am doubtful about them. He seems to favour action which will "avoid hitting the ordinary man-in-the-street" unlike the Irish government's apparent attempt to spread the pain. But if we hit the so-called wealthy in their savings investment vehicles then surely we are truly hitting the ordinary people who have their pensions, savings plans etc invested in these very schemes?
A good read and very illuminating.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book is easy to read and the content is good. Ther timeframe and events are up to date ( autumn 2012). It's layman economics and very easy to understand and follow. The comparsions with the three life style situations, hit the nail on head and many thousands of people in Ireland could identify with the charactures in the book. Worth buying if you want an insight on the irish economic situation at the moment.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent 4 Aug 2014
Format:Kindle Edition
another McWilliams masterpiece - framing economics in the lives of ordinary people -and their struggle with the recession - identifying the causes and ramifications of too much greed in the banking system - from bankers and their customers.
definitely worth the read
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category