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The Gods of War (Emperor Series, Book 4) Paperback – 7 Aug 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (7 Aug. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007164777
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007164776
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 3.4 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (155 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 223,984 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in London, Conn Iggulden read English at London University and worked as a teacher for seven years before becoming a full-time writer. Married with three children, he lives in Hertfordshire. Since publication of 'The Gates of Rome', Conn has written a further thirteen books including the wildly successful 'The Dangerous Book for Boys'.

Product Description

Amazon Review

After the all-conquering film Gladiator, the streets of ancient Rome are thronging as authors rush to set their tales of violent combat and political machinations there. Conn Iggulden’s Emperor sequence is one of the most prestigious of entries in this avalanche, and the latest, The Gods of War, is the most accomplished yet, coming across like Robert Graves’ I, Claudius with an extra adrenalin rush.

In the first volume in this ambitious series, The Gates of Rome, the author demonstrated a master’s skill in conjuring the savagery and sophistication of the era. Iggulden's youthful protagonists, Gaius and Marcus, pledged their friendship in first century Rome. As they developed their skills in the humanities, their bodies were toughened by a battle-hardened ex-gladiator. And as they grew to manhood they became known by the names with which they will be remembered by history: Marcus Brutus and Julius Caesar.

In the latest volume, we're in the time of Caesar as world conqueror, and if The Gods of War delivers more bone-jarring action than subtleties of characterisation, the character of Caesar is still conjured with great vividness. Pompey, dictator of Rome, is at loggerheads with the youthful general, Caesar. The latter, supported by his four experienced legions, has crossed the fabled Rubicon and is heading, inexorably, for Rome. But how does a Roman general take arms against Rome? The senate remains a crucial factor for Caser--as is his association with Mark Antony, Brutus and Octavian. Is this enough to combat the massive legions, loyal to Pompey, spread throughout the conquered world?

More than most in this massive series, The Gods of War is a continent-spanning epic, with the fierce struggles, forced loyalties and Machiavellian intrigues handled with total assurance.

--Barry Forshaw --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

‘Iggulden is in a class of his own when it comes to epic, historical fiction’ Daily Mirror

‘Iggulden…tells an absolutely cracking story…the pace is nail-biting and the set dressing magnificent’ The Times

‘Iggulden weaves an entertaining tale of this world of men, swords, bows and the call of war and the plains’ Daily Express

‘I felt as if a blockbuster movie was unfolding before me…read the book before Hollywood takes it over’ Daily Express


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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By J. Chippindale TOP 500 REVIEWER on 26 Mar. 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is the last book in the series charting the life of Julius Caesar. I found them all very readable and very enjoyable. Perhaps falling a little short of Colleen McCullough's Roman series of books, but there is no shame in that and these books are extremely enjoyable.

Much has been written about Julius Caesar, but like all great men he had his Achilles heel, in more ways than one. Although history portrays him as a very fair minded man, much loved by his soldiers and the common people. He had a terrible temper, which could be vented at any time and woe betide anyone who was in close proximity when this happened. He also had great problems with the `falling sickness' He did everything in his power to hide this from everyone except his closest confidants and friends.

Caesar has his greatest test yet. To do the unthinkable and march against Rome. His aim is to march against his one time son-in-law Pompey, self proclaimed dictator of Rome. Even after the city itself is taken there are many more battles to fight throughout the Roman Empire, even to Egypt, where brother and sister are fighting like cat and dog.

The book is full of passion, love and hatred. It is a story of ambition, loyalty and friendship. It is the tale of one of the greatest generals the world has ever known. Apart perhaps from Alexander the Great, no one man has had the love and loyalty of his troops in such a way as Julius Caesar.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. Chippindale TOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 Mar. 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is the last book in the series charting the life of Julius Caesar. I found them all very readable and very enjoyable. Perhaps falling a little short of Colleen McCullough's Roman series of books, but there is no shame in that and these books are extremely enjoyable.

Much has been written about Julius Caesar, but like all great men he had his Achilles heel, in more ways than one. Although history portrays him as a very fair minded man, much loved by his soldiers and the common people. He had a terrible temper, which could be vented at any time and woe betide anyone who was in close proximity when this happened. He also had great problems with the `falling sickness' He did everything in his power to hide this from everyone except his closest confidants and friends.

Caesar has his greatest test yet. To do the unthinkable and march against Rome. His aim is to march against his one time son-in-law Pompey, self proclaimed dictator of Rome. Even after the city itself is taken there are many more battles to fight throughout the Roman Empire, even to Egypt, where brother and sister are fighting like cat and dog.

The book is full of passion, love and hatred. It is a story of ambition, loyalty and friendship. It is the tale of one of the greatest generals the world has ever known. Apart perhaps from Alexander the Great, no one man has had the love and loyalty of his troops in such a way as Julius Caesar.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By B. J. Madeley on 13 April 2008
Format: Paperback
The Gods of War is the final installment in Conn Igguldens' series of Emperor novels and it sees Julius cross the Rubicon river and take charge of Rome. He follows the fleeing Pompey across to Greece and Egypt where he meets the enigmatic Cleopatra before returning home to be worshipped, idolised and then treacherously murdered by a supposed loyal friend and supporter.

As with the three previous novels, this is a highly readable and enjoyable book. Iggulden manages to keep the reader glued to the page right to the very end, even though the majority of us already know the details of Caesar's final years and eventual demise. This was on the whole an excellent series of novels, I had never previously read anything by this author, but now I eagerly await every book he produces no matter what the subject.

Now for a bit of a rant, I'm fed up of reading reviews criticising Conn Iggulden's tendency to stray from the facts in order to embellish the tale. If readers want a book that is based on nothing but the facts, then please stop reading fictional novels! These are not intended to be 100% historically accurate as the author willingly acknowledges, they are works of fiction which is generally based on facts but with huge juicy dollops of imagination and intellect thrown in.

Overall, I think this was a fantastic novel and indeed series, I don't believe I can recommend them highly enough, so pick them up and find out for yourself!
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By J. Chippindale TOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 Aug. 2006
Format: Paperback
This is the last book in the series charting the life of Julius Caesar. I found them all very readable and very enjoyable. Perhaps falling a little short of Colleen McCullough's Roman series of books, but there is no shame in that and these books are extremely enjoyable.

Much has been written about Julius Caesar, but like all great men he had his Achilles heel, in more ways than one. Although history portrays him as a very fair minded man, much loved by his soldiers and the common people. He had a terrible temper, which could be vented at any time and woe betide anyone who was in close proximity when this happened. He also had great problems with the `falling sickness' He did everything in his power to hide this from everyone except his closest confidants and friends.

Caesar has his greatest test yet. To do the unthinkable and march against Rome. His aim is to march against his one time son-in-law Pompey, self proclaimed dictator of Rome. Even after the city itself is taken there are many more battles to fight throughout the Roman Empire, even to Egypt, where brother and sister are fighting like cat and dog.

The book is full of passion, love and hatred. It is a story of ambition, loyalty and friendship. It is the tale of one of the greatest generals the world has ever known. Apart perhaps from Alexander the Great, no one man has had the love and loyalty of his troops in such a way as Julius Caesar.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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