The Gods of Ancient Rome and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Gods of Ancient Rome:... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: SHIPS FROM USA: PLEASE ALLOW 10 to 21 BUSINESS DAYS FOR DELIVERY. Very Good condition and unread! Text is clean and unmarked! Light shelf wear to edges/cover from storage. --Be sure to compare seller feedback and ratings before purchasing-- Has a small black line on bottom/exterior edge of pages. Tracking is not available for orders shipped outside of the United States. If you would like to track your domestic order please be sure to select the Priority/Expedited Shipping option.
Trade in your item
Get a £5.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Gods of Ancient Rome: Religion in Everyday Life from Archaic to Imperial Times Paperback – 18 Oct 2000


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£36.00
£25.27 £14.25
£36.00 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Gods of Ancient Rome: Religion in Everyday Life from Archaic to Imperial Times + An Introduction to Roman Religion + Religions of Rome: Volume 2, A Sourcebook.
Price For All Three: £82.87

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £5.50
Trade in The Gods of Ancient Rome: Religion in Everyday Life from Archaic to Imperial Times for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £5.50, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press (18 Oct. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0748613900
  • ISBN-13: 978-0748613908
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 2.4 x 15.6 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 804,610 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

The style adopted by Turcan is accessible and readable. His work covers an immense amount of ground in a very small space. At times his abundance of examples is breathtaking. The reader is given a very real sense of the profusion of rites and ritual that accompanied everyday life in private and in public in the Roman world... The wealth of information in this book makes it a most useful introduction to the world of Roman religion." The style adopted by Turcan is accessible and readable. His work covers an immense amount of ground in a very small space. At times his abundance of examples is breathtaking. The reader is given a very real sense of the profusion of rites and ritual that accompanied everyday life in private and in public in the Roman world... The wealth of information in this book makes it a most useful introduction to the world of Roman religion."

About the Author

Robert Turcan is Professor of Roman History at the University of Paris, Sorbonne.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
There was nothing more specifically Roman than domestic worship; it was what immediately distinguished Roman religion, for example on Delos, from the Greek environment, in the case of the colonists who lived on the island. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Not for the Average Reader 26 Aug. 2003
By WSV - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I recently used this book as part of a Summer-session university course on the Archaeology of Religion. Although it contains a healthy amount of information about little known facts concerning Roman religion, it is not for the average reader. Originally written in French, the translation is somewhat poor and confusing.
The majority of the class was at a loss due to the complexity of the book. Even my somewhat rudimentary knowledge of Roman religion was barely adequate to follow the writings. The book lacks adequate chapter breaks resulting in the reader being forced to read the entirety in order not to lose his place.
It says a lot when the professor privately told me that it was a poor choice for a textbook.
16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
A short but surprisingly detailed view of Roman Polytheism 20 Feb. 2005
By Jill Malter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Roman Pagans were a deeply religious people. Turcan's book shows us a great deal about how they worshipped and what rituals they observed. And this book gives even a secular reader a chance to make some sense of it.

Unlike the monotheist god, Roman Goddesses and Gods are perfections of actual attributes. Romans hailed the Gods and Goddesses casually. But their rituals were often serious and complex, for they had to instill a sense of the importance of a vow to be worthy of a particular Goddess or God. And Turcan's book shows us some of these rituals in detail.

As Turcan mentions, when the Romans stopped worshipping the Gods and Goddesses, the Roman Empire quickly fell apart. I think the Christian religion that replaced the Pantheon with a nailed corpse gave Romans little reason to defend their Empire. The new religion was too nihilistic and atheistic. Turcan does not appear to agree with me about this, but he does cite Zosimus who did hold Constantine's failure to celebrate the Secular Games in 314 AD to be responsible for the ruin of the Empire. Turcan also explains that by celebrating the Secular Games, the Romans were in effect "taking out a new 'lease' with the gods."

This is a scholarly and interesting work. I recommend it to Pagans and non-Pagans alike.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Academic, trustworthy 28 Nov. 2009
By Ingela - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is dry and scholarly at times and yet I still enjoyed it because the subject matter is interesting and I trusted the information contained therein. This is one of those books I know I will be happy to have on my shelf as a solid reference text. I think one of the problems with the book is that is does not discuss each God (not even the major ones) in detail, nor the practices associated with a specific God (except re the mystery cults). It is very much an overview of Pagan practices in ancient Rome and the broad way in which the author deals with the subject probably accounts for the occaisional dryness of the text. It is probably directed more at academic types who wish to improve their understanding of the daily life and mentality ancient Romans (which is a noble subject in itself) more than really looking at the spiritual aspect of Pagan deities and practice.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Personable and Efficient 5 Jan. 2012
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Amaranth Books did an excellent job of keeping in contact with me, and responded to my order quicker than anyone I have ever bought from. The book arrived exactly as it was described and they even included a personalized message thanking me for ordering. I originally chose to order this book from Amaranth on a whim, but now I will always look to see if they have my book before I look anywhere else.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback