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The God Problem: Alternatives to Fundamentalism
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on 25 October 2007
Nigel Leaves presents a very readable account of his ongoing study into the alternatives that have been developed by those who feel the pull of religion but cannot deal with aspects of orthodox Christianity.
He covers the work of Bishop John Shelby Spong who retains a belief in God but is highly critical of Church dogma. Then on to the more austere non-realist views of Don Cuppitt and Lloyd Geering. This is followed by grassroots spirituality and religious naturalism. The ideas presented can be complex but are explained in a straightforward manner with the minimum of jargon.
The book is concise, with refreshingly little undisclosed bias and well referenced for the many who will undoubtedly like to read further.
An excellent read.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 31 October 2006
Nigel Leaves has written another wonderfully readable book. This time he deals with the "God Problem": how do we speak about God in a post- 9/11, post- tsunami, postmodern world? He takes four different approaches - panentheism, non-realism, grassroots spirituality and religious naturalism (awe and wonder at the beauty of nature) - and discusses the contribution of each to an understanding of God.

The book is subtitled "Alternatives to Fundamentalism". Leaves is concerned at the violence done in the name of religion and states that his aim in writing is to focus on those trying to reform Christianity from within, is that the world may be a more humane place. Whether the alternatives discussed match up to this aim, he leaves the reader to decide.

The writing is at the same time both clear and engaging. One does not have to be a trained theologian to read and enjoy this book. However, for trained theologians it is also well-footnoted and should prove a useful resource to those looking for a summary of the present state of the debate.

I highly recommend this book.
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on 31 July 2015
The service provided was everything I expected.
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