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The Giver (Essential Modern Classics) Paperback – 27 Mar 2014


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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollinsChildren'sBooks; New Ed edition (27 Mar. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007263511
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007263516
  • Product Dimensions: 19.3 x 12.7 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (206 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,403 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"The Giver, a powerful and provocative novel, is sure to keep older children reading and thinking." New York Times

“Lowry is once again in top form – raising many questions while answering few, and unwinding a tale fit for the most adventurous readers."
Publishers Weekly

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By John on 5 May 2008
Format: Paperback
The Giver by Lois Lowry a children's SF for 8-12 year olds written in 1993 is part of a loose set trilogy set in the same imagined world but not necessarily with the same characters. It deals with a world where your life is one of conformity and happiness. The short novel honestly faces why a society such as this would arise with its benefits and essential failure explored. The core of that failure is that...grief is the price you pay for love. Without sadness, can love and laughter really exist?

We discover a community of unlimited happiness and good manners set in a green and pleasant paradise of high but largely hidden technology. In this world, only 50 children per community are born from genetically approved placements in birth mothers. Regulations define your clothes, toys and your role in society from your first year. From eight you have to volunteer for a range of community duties so that your life long occupation from twelve can start. We join Jonas as the ceremony for 12's is near for the allotment of his calling. Much to his and the communities shock he is not allotted a job but is selected to be the Receiver. In learning what this is, he discovers the hidden pain and dark side of unlimited happiness. This sets off a chain of events as Jonas discovers what being released really means. He faces what growing up means, and consequences whose meaning you have to decide.

The book has over 3000 ratings on Amazon.com alone so we are talking popular and critical success (it won the Newbury Medal- the USA children's literature award). Even so, it is banned in several USA State's School and Library systems because of the dark emotional issues dealt with. Surprisingly doesn't to have attracted the same attention in the UK. If you or your children have not read it then you have missed a classic. But if you have read it then you know why it's enjoyable and highly recommended!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Steven R. McEvoy TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 31 May 2008
Format: Paperback
Lois Lowry is one of those unique authors who has won the John Newbery Medal for children's literature twice. Once for the first book in this trilogy and once for a book about the Holocaust called Number the Stars. (Just as an aside only one other author has ever done that Madeleine L'Engle who I would also recommend highly.) I would begin by recommending any of her books; they are all worth the time and the effort. This trilogy is set in a post apocalyptic world. The first two books each focus on different community's who have recovered from the devastation differently, both have strengths and both have weaknesses. And a young boy must heal them both and the land if either is to survive.

The Giver
Lois Lowry

Jonas is a young boy who lives in a community with a lot of technology and many rules about it. He has only seen an airplane twice for planes were not suppose to over fly villages, it was against the rules. Children of the same age are raised together and each December they move up a grade, when the reach the age of twelve they are selected for occupational training Jonas in talking to his friend states about selections: "Jonas Shrugged. It didn't worry him, how could someone not fit in? The Community was so meticulously ordered, the choices so carefully made." However all the other Twelve's were assigned and Jonas was skipped then at the end of the ceremony it was announced that he had been selected he was chosen to become the `receiver of memory.' He was to learn all the history and story of the people and become an advisor to the council that ruled the village. It only happened every so many generations and only 1 keeper of memories was installed in each village. Jonas and his family take in an infant who is not maturing and growing quickly enough.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Jan. 2005
Format: Paperback
Can you imagine a world where everything is the same? No colour, no music, no hills, no history. This is Jonas' world - where no-one knows when exactly their birthday is, and when children are assigned careers at twelve, without any choice in the matter. Do you think it would be safer? That's what Jonas thought, until... If you want to expand your horizons from our own world, and see how Sameness could rule, then read The Giver. It'll be worth it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By William Mason TOP 50 REVIEWER on 26 Sept. 2014
Format: Paperback
I watched The Giver at the cinema with my 12 year old daughter today. Wow, what a brilliant family sci-fi movie. A utopian future society suppresses feelings and emotions in people, using drugs, to avoid violence, crime, wars, hatred, and love. One man has access to memories and emotions, The Receiver, it's his job to protect the society, and hide the mistakes of the past from them. The Receiver is an old man and standing down, and a teenage boy, Jonas, is being trained up for the job. As he learns more about mankind's past, the more he despises his existence in a bland, colourless, emotionless society. He realises things need to change and this leads to a thrilling conflict. The film is absolutely wonderful, great acting, intelligent script, minimalist but perfectly judged CGI, and the young lad who plays Jonas is outstanding. The story obviously owes a lot to Orwell's 1984 but that's a compliment not a criticism. Watching it had me thinking of the likenesses with Terry Gilliam's Brazil. I've just started reading Maggott Moon this week, which, coincidentally, is a similar tale of a young lad in a dystopian, rigid society with draconian rules. As soon as I've finished it, I'll make sure to read The Giver, because, if it's half as good as the film, it will be a treat.
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