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The Girl Who Played with Fire Audio Download – Unabridged

4.6 out of 5 stars 1,929 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 20 hours and 49 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Whole Story Audiobooks
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 8 July 2009
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002SQ8XH6

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By acid_win VINE VOICE on 6 Jan. 2009
Format: Hardcover
An outstanding and dare I say superior sequel to "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo". Having read the first story of the trilogy this summer I was eager to know how the sequel would compare. In the girl with the dragon tattoo, Lisebeth Salander is definitely an enigmatic character and there are subtle hints that there is a lot of back story to her character. Am I glad that this back story has been developed and interwoven into this sequel. Too often we say "I couldn't put a book down" but in this case it is definitely a book you will be glued to.

The story comes to life when Salander is wanted in connection with some murders that have been commited. From this point the story moves on at a frenetic pace with all characters connected to Salander such as Blomkvist the journalist and Armansky her former employer defending her and trying to get to the bottom of the case alongside a national police investigation.

Ultimately this book is about why is Salander the way she is. What drives her and what is she willing to do to get to the truth?

Enjoy and look forward to the third part of the trilogy which should hopefully be translated from Swedish before the end of the year. If you're lucky (not me) and can read Swedish then why not get the third installment asap. Having said that if you're Swedish you've probably already read it.
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Format: Paperback
When I first read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Philosophy: Everything Is Fire (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series)I was so impressed. Here was a very unique book written by a MAN who seemed to be genuinely sensitive, understanding and empathic to women who have, far too often in history, been the victims of violence from anything emotionally/verbally, physically and sexually abusive at the hands of their significant others to being brutally assaulted sexually and murdered by serial killers who they had never even had previous contact with. Stieg Larsson really got it! Oh happy day!

This book, a sequel to the abovementioned novel, is EVEN BETTER if you could believe that were possible. It gets down and deep into the life of a one Lisbeth Salander who early on became the victim of sexualt assault, falling through the cracks of an inefficient and overburdened child welfare system in Sweden only to be sexually assaulted again. Much as something like this could happen in the United States,she is labelled and discarded as a psychopathic lesbian Satanist while such "pillars of society" as judges, police officers and journalists run free exploiting women from Eastern Europe deceived into the sex trade. Of course when three individuals are found murdered, one of them Salander's former guardian who had sexually assaulted her previously, it is automatically assumed that Salander is the perpetrator. How reminiscent of the more intelligent, skilled and resourceful women in history who the minute they showed ANY backbone in their own defense they were often labeled "witches" and it was justified by "the system" to have them burnt at the stake!
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Format: Paperback
I tend to be a little cynical of so called international booksellers, but still want to know what the most popular books are about and what their appeal is. Being told that you do not have to have read the first in the trilogy, I read The Girl Who Played with Fire, although the length of the book was a little discouraging. I wonder if anyone has done any research into why fiction books are getting longer ?
Having started reading the book, it was initially a little slow as it was not possible to put the opening scenario in any context. However, quite soon it was difficult to put the book down. The book is very well written ( a good translation in English) and like a good crime novel the story is gripping. The whole situation is intriguing and while many readers have complained about the number of characters, as the book progresses it is easier to identify with the different characters. The development of the story is very well done.
The book has now become more interesting as I have learnt more about the author and I wish I had done that before I read the book. Many of the themes in the book are very relevant. Computer hacking is an ongoing concern for anyone who uses the internet for personal or business reasons. Crimes such as sexual abuse including rape, and the manipulation of young people are highlighted. At the same time, the role of journalists, especially the so-called liberal individuals, is shown to be very important in society, although at times very dangerous for them.
Reading the other two books in the trilogy is now something to look forward to. But a map showing the location of the different places mentioned would have lessened the type of irritation that the reader may also have initially with the large number of characters.
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Format: Paperback
After being slightly underwhelmed by the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, I tentatively carried on with the trilogy. I can honestly say that I'm pleased that I did and I enjoyed the sequel much more than the first book.

This book is much more fast paced than its predecessor and the subplots link together much better creating a more cohesive novel. There are numerous characters within this book and I note that other reviewers have mentioned the confusing nature of all of the names. In my opinion if you could keep track of the Vanger family in the GWTDT you will be fine with this one!

The girl who played with fire is set a year after the end of the first book. It gets going once a triple murder is committed and Lisbeth Salander becomes the prime suspect. The book follows the police and Blomkvist's investigations into the crimes and in doing so reveals a deeper insight into Salander and her past. There is much more focus on Salander within this book, which I enjoyed as some of the male characters can appear slightly over the top (as noted by several other reviewers). I'm loathed to give away too much of the plot as it is this that keeps the reader entranced and desperately wanting to know what happens next. I must admit I raced through this book as (once it gets going) it is a real page turner.

The reason I have only given this 4 stars and not 5 is due to the amount of unnecessary detailed descriptions contained within the book. I enjoyed a lot of the Swedish references, but do feel that some of the descriptions went over the top a bit! I also thought it was a bit far fetched in places,which didn't bother me too much. However, I don't quite understand why Larsson felt the need to give his female lead a boob job at the start of the book (?!
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