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The Girl on the Cliff Paperback – 27 Oct 2011

233 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (27 Oct. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0241954975
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241954973
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (233 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 12,170 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Lucinda Riley was born in Ireland, and after an early career as an actress in film, theatre and television, wrote her first book aged 24. Her novel 'Hothouse Flower' (also called 'Orchid House') was selected by the UK's Richard and Judy Bookclub in 2011 and in only four years she has been translated into 30 languages and sold over 5m copies worldwide. She is a multiple New York Times bestselling author and has topped the bestseller charts in four European countries.

Lucinda has now begun an ambitious seven book series, 'The Seven Sisters', which is a story of seven adopted sisters and based allegorically on the mythology of the famous star constellation. Book 1 has already been a top 5 bestseller in Germany, Italy, Brazil and Norway and has recently been published in USA, Greece and France. Book 2, 'The Storm Sister' is to be published globally commencing November 2015. To read more about 'The Seven Sisters' series, please visit her micro website www.thesevensistersseries.com and for her other books, www.lucindariley.com

Concurrently, and in response to demand from her readers, she is rewriting and republishing the eight books from her early career when writing under her maiden name of Lucinda Edmonds.

She lives with her husband and four children on the North Norfolk coast in England and in the South of France.



Product Description

About the Author

Lucinda Riley was born in Ireland. She lives in Norfolk with her husband and four children.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Mr. P. Datta on 23 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback
I appreciate contemporary literature for its beauty and wonderful story-telling. The Girl on the Cliff demonstrates those qualities. It is beautifully written and kept me enthralled until the end. The plot is well developed and thought out. It is about Grania Ryan who returns to her native Ireland following a terrible tragedy and as a result abandoned a good life in America, as she has loving partner and a promising career as an artist. She meets a young girl Aurora in the cliff and develops a special bonding despite strong condemnation from her mother. The special bonding is so touching. Unfortunately, a dark secret changes everything as there is an unwanted history between two set of familes: Ryans and Lisles. The journeys start from Grania great grand-mother where it all begins. How will history change everything? How does the tone of novel change? It is emotionally, poignantly and deeply piece of novel. It shifts between the past and the present, as we take a historical journey to the war-time as the secret spans many years ago. How will knowing the truth change everything? It paints humanity in a negative and positive light. I find the novel absorbing and enjoyable. The characters are wonderfully sketches and connection between past and present is fascinating and intriguing to explore. The novel is brilliant and deserves strong praise in all cylinders.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Lynrow Kernow on 6 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Now, here is a book to curl up with on a cold, dark winter evening.

The story begins with Grania, who has run from her life in New York back to her family home on the Irish coast.

Kathleen, her mother, doesn't understand why. Grania had a wonderful partner, a lovely apartment, she was building a career as a sculptor. But she sees that something has gone wrong and welcomes her daughter home.

And then the girl on the cliff appears. Aurora. A child who has nearly everything: beauty, charm, talent. a wealthy family, a grand home. Everything except a mother.

A very real child, with maybe a touch of magic ...

Grania is charmed by Aurora. And then she is drawn into her life, and her home.

But Kathleen is concerned. Because she knows that the lives of Ryans and Lisles have been entangled before, with unhappy consequences.

And so stories of different generations unfolded, the narrative moving backwards and forwards to build a wonderfully absorbing story.

Every time and every place is captured perfectly. Every story contains a wealth of emotions. Patterns repeat. And themes, around the importance of home and family, echo across the years.

There were times when the story became a little predictable, the characters became a little annoying, the plot a little unbelievable. But it didn't matter.

Because the writing was lovely, and because the author had a lovely way of making you wonder for just the right amount of time before she sets out exactly what you want to know.

There is always a question or two in the air to carry you forward.

Because the plotting, and the way the story builds is so clever. Complex, and yet so easy to understand.
Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Nicola in South Yorkshire VINE VOICE on 17 Feb. 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I really expected to like this book more than I did. It's primarily the story of Grania Ryan, a woman who flees her life and her man in New York to return to her childhood home in Ireland. One day, up on the cliffs she meets Aurora, a young girl. Grania finds her life tied up with that of Aurora, and also realises how entwined their two families have always been.

This is a very readable book. It doesn't require much effort from the reader and is an easy read. But it has such cliched dialogue, in particular the two young girls who feature throughout. I don't believe any child speaks in the way they do. There is also a stereotypical American and the Irish families seem very stereotyped too. And somehow the story manages to jump about five years in the space of one paragraph.

There's a lot crammed into this book in terms of the years it covers, but none of it is particularly well done if I'm honest. It reads a bit like a Mills and Boon sometimes, light romance with a sense of predictability. A bit disappointing.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Lovely Treez TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The Girl on the Cliff has all the elements which usually enchant me in a novel - dual time frame, a variety of interesting locations and characters and a hint of romance. Indeed, the author has packed a lot into this novel - World War I and II, contemporary Ireland and New York, a large cast of characters from a variety of social backgrounds.

In our contemporary story, Grania Ryan has fled her bohemian life (and partner, Matt) in New York following the traumatic experience of a miscarriage. She has returned to the wilds of West Cork to seek solace amid her family, ordinary folk trying to eke out a living on their farm. Her return raises issues which her mother had hoped would remain buried in the past as Grania forges links with their neighbours, the aristocratic Lisle family who have been the cause of much grief to the Ryans. What follows is a rollercoaster ride of a story as we see how the deeds of Grania's ancestors still have a strong influence on the present.

This is an easy, entertaining read and the narrative covers almost a century of family history as well as physically moving from one continent to another, from the sophistication of contemporary New York to the bleakly beautiful coast of West Cork to the grim streets of a London in wartime. There is no doubt that Lucinda Riley is an engaging storyteller.

Unfortunately some aspects made this a good but not great novel for me - I found the dialogue rather stilted at times and the plot predictable. Perhaps there was just too much going on for me to feel connected to the narrative and I didn't feel there was time to get inside the head of any of the characters which is a shame as they could have been so intriguing. A little bit of editing and fine-tuning of the dialogue could have moved it into unputdownable territory rather than an enjoyable enough read. Still a good read for those who enjoy sweeping family sagas, to be sure....
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