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The Giants' Dance Paperback – 4 Jul 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (4 July 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007169256
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007169252
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 4 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 541,884 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robert Carter was born in Staffordshire, near Etruria, the place made famous by Josiah Wedgwood, but was brought up in Sydney, Australia and later in Lancashire, England. Robert studied astrophysics at Newcastle University, where he started the student science fiction society. Writing novels has always played a part in his life, and he's seen enough of the world to be able to write fiction through personal experience.

After university, the US oil industry was booming so Robert went to Dallas, Texas, later on working on rigs in various parts of the Middle East and the war-torn heart of Africa. He was aboard the Ron Tappmeyer, a rig that blew out in the Persian Gulf, killing 19 men. It was dangerous work, but well-paid, and it took him to places that outsiders rarely see, like the Rub-al-Khali of Arabia and hard-to-reach parts of equatorial Africa.

When Robert left the oilfields, he spent time on travel, first to East Berlin and Warsaw, then to Moscow and Leningrad. From there he took the Trans-Siberian railway to Japan. In Hong Kong, Robert worked on a road survey, took tea with the heir of the last king of Upper Burma near Mandalay, and on the path to Everest base camp just happened to run into Sir Edmund Hillary. After traveling around most of India, Sri Lanka and Indonesia, Robert returned home and took up a job with the BBC. Four years later, he left BBC TV to write. Robert finally settled in London, but he still like to head off to interesting parts when time allows.

Robert does a lot of research for his books and loves to share the best on his blog - take a look at http://novelcarter.blogspot.co.uk/

Product Description

Review

Praise for THE LANGUAGE OF STONES:

‘Full of charm and the magic of landscape … an enjoyable read' AMAZON

'A compelling tale that fully utilizes its beautifully crafted characters' DREAMWATCH

‘Carter’s prose is smooth, and he has a real feel for the countryside. His plot keeps the pages turning’ STARBURST

‘Just the right mix of magic, mystery and mud … Images of terrifying supernatural forces are carefully wrought as Carter weaves his spell’ LADS MAG

Book Description

The 15th Century as it should have been

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By ilmk on 16 Mar 2006
Format: Paperback
Carter’s sequel to ‘The Language of Stones’ is as stunning as his first. From the eccentrically brilliant quarter turn of the British Isles map to the continuous warping of actual history and names this is one intellectually startling alternative history fantasy novel.
The sequel takes place two years after Willand’s apparent destruction of the Doomstone at the Sightless One’s monastery. He has retreated to his personal shire where a glee has hidden the village from prying eyes and blessed its people. Having married Willow and bringing up a daughter Bethe, Will finds himself calling on Gwydion one night when he sees a strange light in the sky coming from the village of Little Slaughter. Their resultant investigation and Gywdion’s confession that Maskull has returned from enforced exile encourages Will to grow in stature as an assuming and protesting wizard as both he, Gwydion and the new character of Morann spend some time trying to ascertain the depths of Maskull’s latest intrigues. Will is now an acknowledged lign and battlestone scryer and his maturity is reflected in the fact he is able to progress matters on his own and now dares to openly question Gwydion who’s status as omniscient takes a severe battering in this second novel.
The plot of the sequel steps things up a notch as several battlestones seek to draw the warring factions of the weakly King Hal and his ghastly queen who are driven by the malice of Maskull to hunt down Richard, Duke of Ebor and strip him of all he owns. We are privileged to see one battlestone wreak its havoc on the field of war, another ensnares Will as he fights it in an icy lake, another manipulates him at the climatic battle.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lesley-anne Murray on 9 Jan 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is a fantastic sequel to The Language of Stones The Language of Stones and well worth the read. If you like Tolkien you're going to revel in Carter's work!

Willands story continues, now married to Willow and with a young child he finds himself diving into danger once again. Reunited with Gwydion they go in search of the Battlestones, trying to keep war at bay and out of Maskulls clasp. But how far can the man prophesised as The Great Arthur go, with no knowledge of his past and an assassin on his tail.

Just as gripping as the last, with a few shocks along the path.
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Format: Paperback
as an amateur historian who specialises in the Wars of the Roses, this series has been a must and I have loved them. The main characters from that time are drawn into the mass of myth and magic which surrounds everyone, magic which follows its own inexorable rules and never deviates, which is fantastic. The great death stones, the battles, the power struggles, and poor Willard trying to cope with it all, are just great reading.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Startlingly brillant 17 Oct 2005
By ilmk - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Carter's sequel to `The Language of Stones' is as stunning as his first. From the eccentrically brilliant quarter turn of the British Isles map to the continuous warping of actual history and names this is one intellectually startling alternative history fantasy novel.

The sequel takes place two years after Willand's apparent destruction of the Doomstone at the Sightless One's monastery. He has retreated to his personal shire where a glee has hidden the village from prying eyes and blessed its people. Having married Willow and bringing up a daughter Bethe, Will finds himself calling on Gwydion one night when he sees a strange light in the sky coming from the village of Little Slaughter. Their resultant investigation and Gywdion's confession that Maskull has returned from enforced exile encourages Will to grow in stature as an assuming and protesting wizard as both he, Gwydion and the new character of Morann spend some time trying to ascertain the depths of Maskull's latest intrigues. Will is now an acknowledged lign and battlestone scryer and his maturity is reflected in the fact he is able to progress matters on his own and now dares to openly question Gwydion whose status as omniscient takes a severe battering in this second novel.

The plot of the sequel steps things up a notch as several battlestones seek to draw the warring factions of the weakly King Hal and his ghastly queen who are driven by the malice of Maskull to hunt down Richard, Duke of Ebor and strip him of all he owns. We are privileged to see one battlestone wreak its havoc on the field of war, another ensnares Will as he fights it in an icy lake, another manipulates him at the climatic battle. In the midst of it all he befriends a ked, discovers his twin brother is the Dark Child, spends much time in disguise as the Maceugh and grows an ever more powerful wizard whilst still not understanding his destiny.

Carter spent much of the first novel creating this superb alternative Britain, aptly showing how word of mouth tellings can subtly warp stories as they are handed down. In this second he delivers an improved story telling performance. The plots are entirely crisp, the characterisation effortless and fifteenth century England lingers in the senses throughout the entire novel as it delivers punch after punch, maturing as his main character does. A simply stunning series is in the making here and you would be well advised to read it.
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