The Ghost Stories of Edith Wharton and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Ghost Stories of Edith Wharton Paperback – 27 Oct 1997


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 27 Oct 1997
£0.73


Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1st Scribner Paperback Fiction Ed edition (27 Oct 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684842572
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684842578
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.8 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,540,698 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Book Description

Rich and strange, these stories reveal a seductive and little-known aspect of this superb writer. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Edith Wharton was born in 1862 into one of New York's older and richer families and was educated here and abroad. Her works include "The Age of Innocence, Ethan Frome, The House of Mirth, " and "Roman Fever and Other Stories." As a keen observer and chronicler of society, she is without peer. Edith Wharton died in France in 1937.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
It was the autumn after I had the typhoid. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By The Holy Ferret on 25 Jan 2009
Format: Paperback
To my knowledge, this is the first complete paperback collection of Edith Wharton's ghost stories, and a solid collection it is too. There are the famed chillers 'Afterwards' and 'The Triumph Of Night', but even the weaker tales have their merits, which is what raises Wharton above many of the other authors who wrote horror in the style of Henry James (by whom the tales in this volume are very clearly influenced).

Her stories are completely devoid of antiquarians and scholars, as in the modern ghost story tradition, being concerned instead with inter-personal relationships and the way the supernatural impinges on them. The deconstruction of the husband-wife relationship in 'Pomegranate Seed' is a good example of this, in its examination of the wife's fear of the-other-woman. Wharton is at her best when she's at her most under-stated, whereas her weakest work is when she merely recycles gothic staples. 'The Eyes' for example, with it's looming evil eyes that appear by a bed, isn't sufficiently chilling for a modern reader.

The prose is surprisingly accessible. You don't need a humanities degree to enjoy Edith Wharton's stories, so if you're new to ghost stories I think you'll find her work more easy going than some of the other NAME writers. There's a nice balance of description and dialogue and the issues she addresses, for these are stories about people first and ghosts second, are universal. She doesn't have command of the chilling structure of Le Fanu, but her endings are always enjoyable and give you a good sense of the "ah, so that's it", which any good short must do.

This is a thoroughly enjoyable book. Great for a rainy Saturday afternoon and I'd say it's an obligatory purchase for anyone who likes a good ghost story. Of the few truly great American ghost story writers, Edith Wharton is very, very near the top.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By C. M. Collier VINE VOICE on 9 Mar 2004
Format: Paperback
Edith Wharton is best known for her classic books such as Ethan Frome and The Age of Innocence,but she also wrote superb ghost stories.She has the knack of making her characters so believable that it really seems these things could happen.M R James is the same,which is why I love his stories too.
These are not stories that drip with gore,but when it dawns on you what is going on you get a definite frisson down the spine.
I particularly liked Miss Mary Pask,with its surprise ending.But then,most of these tales do have a surprise ending!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By The Holy Ferret on 25 Aug 2008
Format: Paperback
Any collection of tales is a mixed bag, for each will have a handful of excellent stories as well as a somewhat larger amount of unmemorable ones, at least such is the general rule, and the best way to judge any such collection, strange as it may sound, is to assess the quality of the lesser tales, for if these are worth reading in spite of their flaws then you have a splendid collection.

The Ghost Stories Of Edith Wharton is not exemption from the above mentioned axiom. There are the famed chillers 'Afterwards' and 'The Triumph Of Night', but even the weaker tales have their merits. Wharton is almost as far from the M.R. James school as you can get. I would not say her work is as explicitly psychological as Vernon Lee or Henry James, but her stories are completely devoid of antiquarians, being concerned instead with inter-personal relationships and the way the supernatural impinges on them. The deconstruction of the husband-wife relationship in 'Pomegranate Seed' is a good example of this, in its examination of the wife's fear of the-other-woman.

Wharton's prose is surprisingly accessible. You don't need a humanities degree to enjoy her stories, so if you're new to ghost stories I think you'll find her work more easy going then some of the other aforementioned writers. There's a nice balance of description and dialogue and the issues she addresses, for these are stories about people first and ghosts second, are universal. She doesn't have command of the chilling structure of Le Fanu, but her endings are always enjoyable and give you a good sense of the "ah, so that's it", which any good short must do. This is a thoroughly enjoyable book. Great for a rainy Saturday afternoon and I'd say it's an obligatory purchase for anyone who likes a good ghost story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mrs W Waugh on 2 May 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I didnt enjoy this book very much,she is a good writer but I prefer the more modern ghost stories these days,however they are readable but I wouldnt want to re-read them,I bought this one as a friend recommended her to me,.............
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By B. J. Crossley on 5 Feb 2008
Format: Paperback
There is a story about vampirism which is great, some other good ones too. a couple of clunkers.
Her style is wonderful and elegant. if your a fan of short horror fiction you must read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By H. J. Rowland on 9 Nov 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Edith Wharton's ghost stories are most unusual. They leave the reader suspended in a state of puzzlement and unease. Atmospheric, but, for me anyway, not quite ghostly enough. Definitely worth reading!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Harris on 30 Oct 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have not finished reading this book yet but i would say that Edith Wharton is one of the best ghost story writers of her time and a fine author generally.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback