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The German Army at Ypres 1914 Hardcover – 18 Nov 2010

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Pen & Sword Military (18 Nov. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848841132
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848841130
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 16.5 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 399,535 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Jack Sheldon is now firmly established as the leading authority on the German Army in the First World War. A retired soldier he lives in France and is fully engaged researching and writing. His German Army on the Somme was a run-away success and he has built on his reputation with The German Army At Passchendael, the German Army at Cambrai and The German Army on Vimy Ridge, all with Pen & Sword Books. He lives in France.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By The Bard England on 31 Jan. 2011
Format: Hardcover
The best thing about books on the first war is that the majority of them are free of slanted post war politics and unpolluted by politicaly correct over writing and this is no exception .I have a dozen or more excellant volumes written from the British side of the barricade but only 1 prior to my purchasing this one from the German prospective and boy did I strike gold ! Having already read some of the British accounts of the opening moves around Y`Pres reading this was like fitting two pieces of jig-saw together to give an even fuller account of the battle . I`ve already ordered the rest in the series .The book documents the opening skirmish`s around YPres in the early stages of the war which at the time was very much mobile warfare featuring a great deal of cavalry actions as each side attempted to outflank the other and the beginning of trench warfare .It also sheds light on the role the royal navy played in finishing off the Schlieffen plan already diluted by being obliged to draw off resources to fend off the russian invasion of prussia . I bought this in order to improve my knowledge of the conflict which is more or less basic . I suspect the book is aimed at the more serious students of WW1 and I confess I found myself at times out of my depth forever having to scroll back through its pages to refer to maps and even drag out some contained within other books but don`t be put off by this if like me you`re not an expert on the subject . The great thing achieved by the author is that the regimental diary entries are regulary punctuated with a plethora of eye witness accounts taken from letters written at the time of the actions which gives you a real feel of what was happening .Read more ›
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Richard Hargreaves on 21 Jan. 2011
Format: Hardcover
No-one understands the day-to-day trials and tribulations of the German soldier on the Western Front in the Great War better than Jack Sheldon.

The German Army at Ypres 1914 adds to an already-impressive body of work and, for the first time in English, brings this key battle in the Race to the Sea to life 'from the other side of the hill'.

It's packed with extremely vivid first-hand accounts throughout (I doubt if any have seen the light of day in English before), plus useful maps which help you to follow the progress of the men cited.

What really got me, however, was the poem cited on the very last page; the sentiments within are not a million miles away from those expressed by British soldier-poets.

Should be on the bookshelf of anyone interested in either the opening moves of the Great War or the German Army in WW1.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Chris Baker VINE VOICE on 3 April 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is the latest in a sequence of books by Jack Sheldon, examining the German army and its operations on the Western Front. As a body of work they have established Jack as a reliable authority and have justifiably developed a reputation as absorbing and insightful works, bringing balance and perhaps some surprises to British readers.

"The German Army at Ypres 1914" is in some ways a slightly misleading title, for the scope of this volume covers a good deal more than the intensive conflict between the BEF and the Germans in front of Ypres from 20 October to 22 November 1914. The "advance to contact" and early skirmishes as both sides sought to move around and outflank the other in the series of events that made up the so-called "Race to the Sea" take us from the area of Ploegsteert and the Messines ridge all the way up to the Yser line and Disksmuide. As such, this is as much about the Belgian and French engagement with the enemy as it is about the BEF, presenting us with the single most coherent view of the developing battle in Flanders that I have ever read.

The author draws heavily upon published regimental histories, with a leavening of some first-hand accounts and primary documents. As such there is a danger that the source material is a little varnished and likely to have been presented in an optimistic light, but Jack is wise enough to cut through the regimental bull and bravado, to pull out the key facts and ensure that what we have is a reliable telling of the tale.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. Lawes on 3 May 2011
Format: Hardcover
I believe this fifth volume of Jack Sheldon's German Army series is quite the best so far. His style has matured and is now well established and easily recognized. He paints a vivid picture without the use of superlatives, he illustrates his subject by reference to eye witness accounts (almost all of which are previously unpublished) and his narrative holds the reader's attention throughout. "The German Army at Ypres 1914" is a timely and most important addition to the vast amount of existing literature - much of which is not original but merely regurgitations of previous works. It makes an invaluable contribution to modern military history, debunking many misconceptions that have evolved in the erstwhile absence of evidence "from the other side".

Jack Sheldon strips away much of the hyperbole and untruths associated especially with British versions of the events of 1914, and teases out detail in order to present as factual an account as is possible. In this volume, he gets to work immediately on the problems of lack of preparation, inadequate training and deficiencies in equipment which foretell of the disasters yet to come. This dispels the notion held hitherto of the professionalism of German planning and staff work and the Army's ability as a fighting machine. Once into the text the descriptive passages on the difficulties of communication, the loss of officer and NCO junior commanders, order and counter order and accounts of infantry tactical manoeuvre are all described with great fluency by eye-witnesses. In particular, the descriptions of night attacks at regimental level (probably the most difficult exercise of all) show how the German Fourth Army was poorly prepared at this stage of the war.
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