FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Gaudi Key has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Gaudi Key Paperback – 20 Oct 2008


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£0.01 £0.01
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Gaudi Key + Gaudi: A Biography
Price For Both: £21.98

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Harper (20 Oct. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007281633
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007281633
  • Product Dimensions: 11.5 x 3.4 x 17.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 491,965 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Andreu Carranaza is the author of six novels and three books of poetry. Esteban Martín is an anthropologist and author who founded his own small publishing house, Littera.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

2.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By R. Nicholson-morton on 17 Dec. 2008
Format: Paperback
I tend not to slate books because I know how difficult it is to get accepted. But I'm breaking that rule on this one. The Gaudi Key is dire. Although it's translated from the Catalan, we can't blame the translator. I cannot fathom how this was accepted in the first place; someone at Harper should be thoroughly ashamed of foisting this onto the public. It might be telling that there are no review quotes, even translated ones. In the final analysis, this is an ideal book for writing tutors to use - to show how not to construct a book.
The characters are flat and never engage the reader, because the writers clearly were more involved in the puzzle posed to the heroine Maria rather than fleshing out individuals. There are pages crammed with characters' speech - exposition downloaded from textbooks or other sources; and one character has the nerve to say, 'I hope I'm not boring you.' Well, sadly, the writers bored me with their treatise disguised as a thriller. Part 3 is no less than thirty pages of a history lesson, with the Templars thrown in for good measure. Maria is the main character - yet there are ninety consecutive pages when she doesn't appear!
In many scenes the character point of view shifts from one to another and often we haven't a clue who is speaking; it's as if the writers don't care, they just want to spout the information out of their puppets' mouths. An entire chapter is given over to the villains plotting, but we're not shown anything, it's just one speech after another.
Visualisation in tense scenes is important so the reader can see what's happening - but it rarely exists in this book's pages. The heroes are apprehended in the hallway when in the next breath they're in another room - how'd they get there?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Lucy Felthouse VINE VOICE on 2 Dec. 2008
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed The Da Vinci Code, and preferred Angels & Demons, so thought this book, as it's of a similar ilk, would be fab.

How wrong I was. I abandoned the book several times because I realised I just didn't care what was going to happen next. The characters are flat and dull, and I didn't particularly like them.

Nothing flowed, and although the clues were clever, they weren't laid out in such a way that you'd try and solve them. It was all force-fed to you.

The ending was awful too. I was hoping for a really satisfying ending to tie everything up, but it was just rubbish. There's nothing redeeming about this book at all. The sense of urgency and intrigue just wasn't there for me, and it doesn't look like I'm the only one...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By SAP VINE VOICE on 11 Nov. 2008
Format: Paperback
Everything about this book, on the surface at least, is like Dan Brown's books, most famously The Da Vinci Code. The cover artwork is similar, even the name. 'The' followed by someone famous followed by 'key', which is similar to 'code'. It seems to be the fashion just lately. There are many books on the market that are also blatant and unashamed copies.

However, this one, at least, has tried but failed to copy one aspect of Brown's books. It's not that much of a page-turner. It failed to catch my attention and to pique my curiosity from the start, which is something Brown can do with consummate ease, and I only really started to care what happened with three-quarters of the book behind me! Though the fact that I DID begin to care a little is, I suppose, some praise.

The whole thing is just too contrived. Everything is so URGENT, the clock is ALWAYS ticking, there's a cliff-hanger at the end of every chapter. It feels like some sort of corporate, team-building, orienteering exercise that Miguel and Maria (our hero and heroine) are on. Go here, find this clue, solve this puzzle, which takes you to the next point on the map where you will find another clue and puzzle to solve, ad nauseam.

And the first three-quarters of the book (before Miguel and Maria go on their team-building exercise) just feels like one long lecture on Gaudi and his architecture. Yes, it's nice, I suppose. It looks pretty and quaint, but I don't want a new character to come along every chapter to lecture me on it.

Also, I really didn't understand most of the book. I don't think the puzzles are meant to be solved by the reader. They're usually solved in a feverish flash of (divine?) inspiration that doesn't actually include any rhyme or reason.
Read more ›
33 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tulstig on 6 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback
Having already bought the book, then read the reviews I was a little concerned that I'd not enjoy it at all. However I DID enjoy the book. IT seems that the only way of classifying this type of book is comparing it to 'The Da Vinci Code': so here goes- the story is similar and the pace similar too. The characters are developed just as much as the DVC but the ending is not as unsatisfactory. OK so there may be a few holes in the plot but all in all it is a good read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Cheshire on 4 May 2009
Format: Paperback
Ok it ain't Tolstoy. But who gave the Da Vinci Code a literary prize lately? Ignore the churlish reviews. This is a Dan Brown rip off of course. But didn't he rip off the Holy Blood and the Holy Grail? So down to the basics. Is it entertaining? Yes. Is it fun? Yes - except look out for one amazingly gruesome torture chapter. Is a page turner? Yes. Does it end ok? Definitely. If you've been to Barcelona and done the essential Gaudi tour you'll probably enjoy this. A good bad book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback