The Future of Faith and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£1.71
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Future of Faith Paperback – 20 Oct 2010


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£1.71
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HarperOne; Reprint edition (20 Oct. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061755532
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061755538
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.5 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,352,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

At this crucial turning point in history, Harvey Cox reminds us of essential religious values and imperatives . . . A timely and prophetic book. --Karen Armstrong, author of A History of God

This important book has not only helped me understand the past, present, and future of this amazing phenomenon called Christianity ... it has also motivated me to keep working to help make actual the possible future Cox envisions. --Brian McLaren, author of A New Kind of Christian

At this crucial turning point in history, Harvey Cox reminds us of essential religious values and imperatives . . . A timely and prophetic book. --Karen Armstrong, author of A History of God --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Harvey Cox is the Hollis Professor of Divinity emeritus at Harvard, where he has taught since 1965, both at Harvard Divinity School and in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences. The Future of Faith is being published to coincide with Cox's retirement in 2009. His book The Secular City, published in 1965, became an international bestseller and has sold over one million copies; it is widely regarded as one of the most influential books of Protestant theology in the twentieth century. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Thurman L. Faison on 14 July 2010
Format: Hardcover
Dr Cox is imminently qualified to take the reader from the beginnings of the history of Christianity up to the present day and he convincingly makes the case for the future of faith which will not and cannot be controlled by religious institutions. He clearly indicates that it will never be "creeds" alone which will determine the future forms of Christianity, but rather the "deeds" which Jesus exemplified as the prime elements of the kingdom. I might suggest that there is also another dimension in this equation which I would include along with this illiteration and that is "needs". The needs of the people play an important role in the changing expression of the church and it could easily be placed alongside of "creeds" and "deeds". The needs of the people who do believe, and many of them thirst for the mysteries and power of the kingdom to manifest in their personal lives. Jesus did say that "those who hunger and thirst for righteousness will be filled". There are those who have thirsted not only for righteousness but for spiritual gifts and powers, whose prayers God has heard. Dr Cox does state this fact in other lines of thought when he refers to the "age of the spirit" and the rise of "Pentecostalism". He makes it very clear that "we need not assume that creedal Christianity is the only option" p78. Here is the crux of the matter, there are other options in the experience and expressions of the Chritian faith that have continued to break out of the molds and constraints of both hierarchical and creedal Christianity.

In chapter three, Dr Cox uses the metaphor, "we find ourselves on a ship that has already been launched" pg 37. We are passengers among many others who are sailing in the midst of spiritual mystery,"but how we live with it differs".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Ray V on 2 Aug. 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
An encouraging and thought-provoking book. I fully agree with the main point, that we are moving from the age of 'belief' to the age of 'faith'. I am not quite so convinced that this is happening in Islam too, but great news if it is.
Unfortunately the book has some irritating flaws. There are a lot of spelling mistakes or misprints, at least in the Kindle edition, which is what I read. There are also places where the author seems to have written carelessly and/or not checked his facts. For instance, 'kyrios' is Greek for Lord, not 'anointed one', which is 'Christ'. I cannot believe a scholar does not know this, so it is evidently a carelessly written sentence.
The reference to John Henson's translation of the New Testament is obviously from hearsay (there is no reference note) and it is very garbled. John Henson is a Baptist minister in retirement, not a 'former' Baptist minister, which gives a different impression altogether. The name of the book is wrong: it is "Good as New", not "Good as News"! This could easily have been checked on the Amazon website. "Barry" is Henson's name for Barabbas, not Barnabas. Also, Cox lumps this translation together with all those who stick to the traditional New Testament canon, but in fact it does not: it omits Revelation and a few other books, and includes the Gospel of Thomas. When an author is so wrong about something you happen to know about, it makes you wonder what else he is wrong about.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Harvey Cox has played a significant role in relation to ecumenism, inter-faith dialogue and the history of ideas. In many ways, this book reflects his breadth of experience and celebrates his life-long contribution. It is beautifully written and easy to read, and so it will appeal to a wide audience. It offers a timely challenge to the institutional Church, as well as a word of hope for those who are searching for meaning. His main concern is the two-fold shift from faith to belief and from dynamic Christian communities to static hierarchical structures. In this light, his reflections on the Emperor Constantine's corporate takeover of the Church in the 4th century are illuminating. Moreover, we all benefit greatly from his broad experience of world religions as well as the Church in the Global south. In short, Harvey Cox's experience is not only interesting, but it also lends weight to his heart-felt plea for faith and freedom.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback