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The Function of Criticism (Radical Thinkers) Paperback – 21 Oct 2005


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More About the Author

Acclaimed literary scholar and cultural theorist Terry Eagleton is Professor of Cultural Theory at the National University of Ireland, Galway, Professor of English Literature at Lancaster University, and Distinguished Visiting Professor of English Literature at Notre Dame.

Terry Eagleton is the author of many books including The Idea of Culture (2000), Sweet Violence: The Idea of the Tragic (2002), the bestselling text Literary Theory: An Introduction (1983, 1996, 2008), Trouble with Strangers: A Study of Ethics (2009), and the forthcoming On Evil (2010).

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‘Eagleton is a combative, fiercely articulate and witty Marxist literary critic.’ -- The Nation

‘Eagleton is second to none among cultural critics writing in the English language today.’ -- The Guardian

‘Eagleton is a combative, fiercely articulate and witty Marxist literary critic.’ -- The Nation

‘Eagleton is second to none among cultural critics writing in the English language today.’ -- The Guardian

About the Author

Terry Eagleton is Professor of Cultural Theory and John Rylands Fellow, University of Manchester. His other publications include Ideology; Heathcliff and the Great Hunger; Against the Grain; Walter Benjamin and Criticism and Ideology, all from Verso.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The contraction of the public function of Literary Criticism 21 Jan. 2013
By Shalom Freedman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Eagleton presents a historical overview of Literary Criticism with the aim of illuminating its more marginalized situation at the time of the book's publication. (1984) He proposes that the great period of Criticism was initiated in the late eighteenth century by Addison and Steele. He supposes that in that world of Criticism a public sphere was created in which rational discourse was the central element. He suggests that in contemporary times Criticism has been reduced to being a form of public relations for publishers, and an internal academic affair in which a few experts write for a few more experts. This book was written before the Internet age in which there has been a Democratization of Writing and Criticism . I wonder how Eagelton would understand this development and whether he would consider it a positive development.
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