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Product details

  • Paperback: 143 pages
  • Publisher: Corwin; 4th edition (16 Sept. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1412976375
  • ISBN-13: 978-1412976374
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 417,824 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

"In some places, Third Way politics have barely begun. In others, they have been pushed as far as they can go. It is high time for a new Fourth Way of social and educational reform. In this unique and excellent text, Andy Hargreaves and Dennis Shirley set out this way for the very first time, and also provide crystal clear examples of what it looks like in practice." (Anthony Giddens, Director, London School of Economics 2009-03-23)

"In The Fourth Way, Hargreaves and Shirley draw on their firsthand studies of the highest-performing systems in the U.S. and across the world to demonstrate that our best hope for education in a time of turmoil rests in change strategies that are, at once, both professional and democratic. Inspiring in vision, accessible in style, and solid in its evidence base, this book will be an engine for change in the years to come." (Linda Darling-Hammond, Professor of Education 2009-03-31)

"Andy Hargreaves and Dennis Shirley, always one or two steps ahead of the field, have done it again. An extremely balanced and insightful treatment of the first three ways of change, in which the authors clearly display the strengths and limitations of each model. And then they go to town in mapping out the Fourth Way—a concise and compelling framework for change that integrates teacher professionalism, community engagement, government policy, and accountability. The Fourth Way is itself a powerful 'catalyst for coherence' in a field that badly needs guidance. Read the book and rethink your approach to educational reform." (Michael Fullan, Educational Consultant 2009-02-02)

"The Fourth Way might just offer the best ideas yet for broad-scale educational improvement. Hargreaves and Shirley refreshingly depart from old school arguments. Instead, with the aid of concrete examples, they identify and embrace the successful elements of past education reform efforts while illustrating the flaws in unhelpful efforts. Their careful analysis and insights on lessons learned will be invaluable to anyone serious about making positive, sustainable changes that deliver a great public school to every student." (Dennis Van Roekel, President 2009-05-27)

"Perplexed and demoralized by policies that diminish and routinize their work, many educators fear that public schooling has reached a dead end. In this informed and inspiring book, Hargreaves and Shirley point to a new and promising path for progress. The Fourth Way is not only open to educators, but must be forged by them with shared purpose, foresight, and common sense." (Susan Moore Johnson, Pforzheimer Professor of Teaching and Learning 2009-05-05)

"The new era—the Fourth Way—holds more than just promise. Elements of this approach are underway in different parts of the world at this very moment, and the authors shine light on each as they encourage the reader to tap into the very best practices to ensure that the next wave truly leaves no child, family, or community behind!" (Alan M. Blankstein, President 2009-05-14)

"The authors propose a new vision for transforming public education for the 21st century. They argue that school systems must move away from a culture of high-stakes testing, encourage innovation and creativity, and engage parents and communities in educational change. Their ideas are timely and relevant for educational leaders today." (Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director 2009-04-21)

"In this timely and inspirational book, Andy Hargreaves and Dennis Shirley challenge our current thinking about educational change. Their argument for interdependence, empowerment, collective courage, and professionalism will resonate with all who have wrestled with these issues. It will leave a lasting impression. Read it!" (Steve Munby, Chief Executive 2009-03-23)

"This is a great book! Andy Hargreaves and Dennis Shirley have an incredible ability to describe important issues in incisive and compelling ways." (Dennis Sparks, Emeritus Executive Director 2009-03-23)

"Andy Hargreaves and Dennis Shirley provide inspirational and challenging formations for next schools and their leaders in The Fourth Way. The celebration of personal capacity and the promotion of educational change through deepened and demanding learning, professional quality, and engagement provides hope and catalyzes our best values to regenerate and improve society. An outstanding vision for our future." (Jenny Lewis, CEO 2009-03-31)

Change in schools is generally not well done. Principals and school boards often are so impacted by the press of the present that they cannot see the "big," strategic picture, so they resort to the few well-tried strategies that have served them well in the past. Andy Hargreaves is a highly credible researcher on change in education. In this book, he joins with Dennis Shirley to provide a new, alternative way of re-examining change in schools.

The first three change genre are:
1. Innovation and inconsistency (1945-1975circa) and Complexity and contradiction (1975- late 1980s); 2. The way of the markets and standardisation (to 1995, neoliberalism); and
3. Performance and partnership (1995- present, modified New Public Management).

The authors examined aspects of the first three ways of change and decided what was worth keeping: inspiration, innovation and autonomy (from the First Way); urgency, consistency and all-inclusive equity (from the Second Way) and balance and inclusiveness, public involvement, financial re-investment, better evidence and professional networks (from the Third Way).

Six pillars of purpose and partnership characterise the Fourth Way:
1. An inspiring and inclusive vision;
2. Strong public engagement;
3. Achievement through investment;
4. Corporate educational responsibility;
5. Students as partners in change; and
6. Mindful learning and teaching.

Teacher professionalism, which took a nose-dive in the desperate push towards national standards, is re-asserted in the Fourth Way. Importantly, Hargreaves does not forget the important work that he did on sustainable leadership, and he reminds us of the need for responsibility before accountability.

This book provides a useful sense of direction to everyone imbedded in school change, and it is an important reference for all school leaders.

(Neil MacNeill, Principal 2009-09-29)

About the Author

Andy Hargreaves is the Thomas More Brennan Chair at the Lynch School of Education, Boston College, and the elected Visiting Professor at the Institute of Education, London. He is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Educational Change and serves as leading editor of the first and second International Handbook of Educational Change. Hargreaves is the cofounder and former director of the International Centre for Educational Change at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education in Toronto.

Dennis Shirley is professor at the Lynch School of Education at Boston College. Shirley's educational work spans from the nitty-gritty micro-level of assisting beginning teachers in complex school environments to the macro-level of designing and guiding large-scale research and intervention projects for school districts, states, and networks. Shirley was the first US scholar to document the rise of community organizing as an educational change strategy, and his activities in this arena have led to multiple long-term collaborations and a steady stream of speaking engagements and visiting professorships in the United States, Canada, Ireland, Germany, Austria, Spain, Italy, the United Kingdom, and Japan.

Shirley publishes frequently in Educational Leadership, the Phi Delta Kappan, Teachers College Record, and Education Week. With colleague Andy Hargreaves, he recently conducted a study of over 300 secondary schools in the United Kingdom affiliated with the Raising Achievement Transforming Learning network of the Specialist Schools and Academies Trust. In addition, Shirley and Hargreaves completed a study of the Alberta Initiative for School Improvement, a network sponsoring lateral learning within and across schools in the world’s second highest-achieving jurisdiction after Finland.

Fluent in German, Shirley recently has spoken at and advised the Free University of Berlin, the University of Vienna, the University of Hildesheim, and the University of Dortmund on topics ranging from community engagement in schools to the reform of teacher education. At home in Boston, MA, Shirley is in the fourth year of leading a teacher inquiry seminar along with teacher leader Elizabeth MacDonald that is described in their recently published Teachers College Press book, The Mindful Teacher.

Shirley has received numerous scholarly awards, including fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Bad Godesberg, Germany, and the Rockefeller Study and Conference Center in Bellagio, Italy. He holds a doctoral degree from Harvard University.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mike M on 1 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book unpacks the education of the last decades and leads to the where next conclusion. It is well written and interprets the politics of education and the impact government involvement and policy has had on our education practice and outcomes in a highly readable way. It is not just for academics but for all those interested in the education of children. Should be compulsory reading for all MP's and DfE officials.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David Jenkins on 3 Nov. 2011
Format: Paperback
This is an easy to read and interrogate key ideas concerning how we work as leaders, it is on a similar line to 'Lasagne without the pasta please!' school improvement book. These two go together well full of ideas and easy to dip into at any time providing food for thought and strategies to move provision forward.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Renwick Grant on 6 Oct. 2013
Format: Paperback
I cannot fairly review this as I have only read the blurb and already-posted reviews. However I am appalled that Shirley, who seems to be much admired in Germany, has apparently nothing to say about the German state's continuing use of Hitler-era law to persecute its home-educating families. The situation is against all human rights. See: [...]
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Picking your way through the educational change mine-field 27 Sept. 2009
By Dr Neil MacNeill - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Hargreaves & Shirley: The Fourth Way.
Change in schools is generally not well done. Principals and School Boards often are so impacted by the press of the present that they cannot see the "big", strategic picture, so they resort to the few well-tried strategies that have served them well in the past. Andy Hargreaves is a highly credible researcher on change in education. In this book (The Fourth Way) he joins with Dennis Shirley to provide a new, alternative way of re-examining change in schools.

The first three change genre are:
1. Innovation and inconsistency (1945-1975circa) and Complexity and contradiction (1975- late 1980s);
2. The way of the markets and standardisation (to 1995, neoliberalism); and
3. Performance and partnership (1995- present, modified New Public Management).
The authors examined aspects of the first three ways of change and decided that it was worth keeping: inspiration, innovation and autonomy (from the First Way); urgency, consistency and all-inclusive equity (from the Second Way) and balance and inclusiveness, public involvement, financial re-investment, better evidence and professional networks (from the Third Way).
Six pillars of purpose and partnership characterise the Fourth Way:
1. An inspiring and inclusive vision;
2. Strong public engagement;
3. Achievement through investment;
4. Corporate educational responsibility;
5. Students as partners in change; and
6. Mindful learning and teaching.

Teacher professionalism, which took a nose-dive in the desperate push towards national standards, is re-asserted in the Fourth Way. Importantly, Hargreaves does not forget the important work that he did on sustainable leadership, and he reminds us of the need for responsibility before accountability.

This book provides a useful sense of direction to everyone imbedded in school change, and it is an important reference for all school leaders.
Useful 8 July 2014
By Marissa Potts - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Can be dense at times, but overall a good book and resource for teacher leaders and school admin.
Needed for class 6 July 2014
By Theresa Danielle Driscoll - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a book I had to purchase for class. It was informative about how education has evolved over the years and how the US might still be stuck in the 3rd way. Interesting read.
6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
summary and critical notes 16 Mar. 2010
By AnnaJ - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This fairly short book is split into four chapters. The first chapter is titled the three ways of change and aims to set out a recent historical overview of trends in educational policy, what their goals were, and how they changed. `The first way of innovation and inconsistency' is characterized as having occurred between the end of the Second World War and the mid 1970's. Then, according to Hargreaves and Shirley, there was `the second way of markets and standardization,' which began in the late 1980's and continues to characterize education today. Finally, the `third way of performance and partnerships' is described as beginning somewhere in the mid 1990's and continues through the present. Though the trends are presented clearly, the evidence is not really satisfying. Events in the United States and Great Britain are the trendsetters and further evidence for the so called innovation, inconsistency, complexity, and other adjectives to describe the periods, are based on longitudinal research titled `change over time'. The `change over time' study is used to characterize the further three chapters and forms the primary inspiration of what should characterize the fourth way. Given the important role of the `change over time' study, it is surprising that no attention is paid to describing the length, scope and depth of the study.
As the third way ideals in effect were meant to bridge the gap between the first and second way, the second chapter, `the three paths of distraction' seeks to address three reasons why the third way failed. Firstly, the path of autocracy is said to have occurred when the people in control have sought to impose the third way with no room for schools and teachers to implement the third way in a context appropriate manner. I think the path of autocracy is historically a problem that all states have faced and continue to face: how much to interfere and prescribe in education. Secondly, the path of technocracy is described as the data collecting phenomenon where moral and social economic issues are converted to statistics and schools held solely responsible for `closing the gap'. Technocracy is a problem well described by the authors in this chapter and easy to identify with. Thirdly, the path of effervescence is described as a situation where schools and teachers are encouraged to share good practice, but the solutions found are usually short term and of a euphoric nature. Overall, this chapter has some good insights, but does not stand strong as three ways distracting from implementing the third way, as these reflect wider and more historical problems in society as a whole.
The third chapter `the four horizons of hope,' includes four case studies from which the authors have derived their inspiration for the fourth way for educational change. The first case study reflects on the education policy in Finland, considered to be the best education system of the world. Among the many lessons the authors derive from the Finnish example, two primary ones are that the state has a steering, not prescribing role, and that in Finnish society education is considered a collective responsibility and thus the teaching profession as a whole is greatly valued. The second case study is the `Raising Achievement Transforming Learning' initiative in the United Kingdom which involved networking and peer support between schools. Key lessons the authors derive from this approach is that development, professional responsibility and energetic involvement were key factors leading to change in schools in contrast to negative characteristics such as a focus on delivery, administrative accountability and bureaucratic alignment. Thirdly, though not a specific case, `democratic movement' is given as a horizon of hope, which shows examples of how community organization in the United States has supported educational improvement. Finally, `the turned around district' is the case study of a suburb in London which, due to demographic changes, became a low performing education district. This situation changed when the local education authority began to employ community development methods affecting the wider community, leading to educational improvement. The chapter's title, presents these four horizons of hope as if they were something novel. However, community development and community organization, lead to social cohesiveness which improves the whole community and this is not and should not be a novel realization for education and for the broader realms of policy making. Neither should the primary lessons from the RATL as derived by the authors, come as surprising, unique, new lessons for educational practitioners. The case of Finland is great, but obviously will not be directly applicable in other contexts. Thus the third chapter, though interesting, does not contribute strongly as a foundation for a new fourth way in educational change.
Finally, the last chapter describes the authors answers to the failings of the first, second and third way in educational policy. This is done by outlining six pillars of purpose, three principles of professionalism and four catalysts of coherence. After the numbers and lists that were used as frameworks in the first three chapters, it is difficult to add these six pillars, three principles and four catalysts to the overall framework. Instead of presenting a clear picture of the fourth way then, this chapter is the most difficult to read and comprehend. Inspiring vision, public engagement, investment, corporate responsibility in change, students as partners in change and mindful learning and teaching, are not at all new pillars of purpose. In all the trends in policy from first, second to third way, these have all played a role, if not at the policy level then definitely at the individual school level. Which school has not aimed or wanted to include these six pillars of purpose? That students are seen as agents of change, is interesting as the first three chapters do not lead to this conclusion because they are focused on teachers. Though, maybe it was included precisely for that very reason. High quality teachers, powerful professional associations and lively learning communities are deemed the new three principles of professionalism. It sounds appealing with the recent trends towards `life long learning', but seriously, which country or school has not aimed to have good quality teachers? Finally the four catalysts of change are described as sustainable leadership, integrating networks, responsibility before accountability, and differentiation and diversity. Overall, in my opinion, the fourth way presents nothing novel for educational policy but attempts to recreate the ideals which have stood at the core of education throughout history.
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The Holy Grail of Education 24 Dec. 2010
By indreshc - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is most certainly the "Holy Grail" of how to bring sanity, creativity, and life back into one of the most important human processes in society -- education. Hats off to both the authors! What a great service they have done to society not just in the US but around the world!
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