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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 14 December 2014
Ken Wilber hasn't written an original work since Integral Sprituality, which was published back in 2006. For eight years, he has only been repeating everything he already wrote until then. So I was excited to learn that finally the long-awaited second part of the "Kosmos Trilogy" (the first part being Sex, Ecology, Spirituality from 1996) was going to be released. This eBook, The Fourth Turning, is supposed to be a summary of that book, which is forthcoming next year. It's cheap, short, so I was eager to read it.
The contents of this book are nothing new, though. All Wilber does is regurgitate his own materials of the past twenty years, actually even skipping significant strides forward he made in Integral Spirituality, and settling for a summary of his Integral Theory. Don't get me wrong, I admire that theory and have written two books myself based on its framework. It is just disappointing that Wilber has not evolved a bit in the past decade and keeps rewriting the same material over and over again.
Worse, this book is simply badly written, with an emphasis on drowning the reader in vaguenesses, that require you to have read his previous work to get a basic understanding of, but otherwise add nothing new to it. He rambles a lot, claiming scientific proof that is nowhere to be found and basing his views of consciousness beyond the Integral level on nothing but conjecture and his understanding of one or two other writers.
The promise of providing a view of a new type of Buddhism falls flat, because this book is not about Buddhism at all, but is only another promotion of his general theory. The last ten pages of the book do an actual attempt to apply his theory to today's variations of Buddhism, but fail to go into any depth or application. Rather, he refers back to his own theory again, thus repeating himself in his own repetition of himself.
Wilber has nothing new to offer anymore. At least I now know I need not be tempted to buy his next book.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 12 August 2014
This is a promissary note for Ken Wilber's next blockbuster due about next Jan. His work and explanation of it is more refined at each iteration.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 1 April 2014
Interpreting and building upon this wisdom tradition in a way that appreciates and shows respect for it's development over the ages.
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