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The Fourth Protocol Paperback – 7 Apr 2011

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Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Arrow (7 April 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099559846
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099559849
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 25,465 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Frederick Forsyth is the author of a number of bestselling novels including The Day of the Jackel, The Odessa File, The Dogs of War, The Devil's Alternative and The Fourth Protocol. He lives in Hertfordshire, England. www.frederickforsyth.co.uk

Product Description

Review

"A triumph . . . as good as any Forsyth since The Jackal" (The Times)

"Forsyth's best book so far" (Washington Post)

"The most fascinating, informative and suspenseful spy novel since le Carre's The Little Drummer Girl" (Irish Press)

"When it comes to espionage, international intrigue and suspense, Frederick Forsyth is a master" (The Washington Post)

Review

'A triumph ... as good as any Forsyth since The Jackal.' (The Times)

'Forsyth's best book so far.' (The Washington Post)

'The most fascinating, informative and suspenseful spy novel since le Carre's The Little Drummer Girl.' (Irish Press)

'When it comes to espionage, international intrigue and suspense, Frederick Forsyth is a master.' (The Washington Post) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Maciej TOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 Oct. 2007
Format: Paperback
I am aware that there are many excellent spy books, but in my modest opinion this is the one that describes the best this strange and dangerous universe that is secret war.

Frederick Forsyth wrote a couple of even better books ("The day of the Jackal", "The dogs of war") but they were not exactly about spying. In this book, written in the 80s, he describes a very clever and dangerous plot of KGB, which, if successful, could really break NATO and leave Western Europe vulnerable to a possible Soviet takeover. The description of Soviet inner circles of power are very good, much better that in the usual spy stuff - Frederick Forsyth was one of the few Cold War spy writers who had a really good understanding of USSR and it shows here. The story is very coherent, the plot is plausible and technically possible and its execution is described in incredibly professional way.

There are however other stories circling around the main plot which describe some of the horribly dirty tricks used by the intelligence communities all around the world (the story takes us from United Kingdom to Soviet Union and then to Africa, before coming back to UK). There are no superheroes in this book (although there are superlosers) and this is definitely not a James Bond movie material - there is however a masterly executed description of the gray, shadowy, dirty and smelly world, where virtually nothing is what it appears and every double bottom has a third bottom... I will absolutely not reveal anything about the plot, but prepare to be surprised. Many times. There are humouristic moments in this book, although this is a dark humour - there is much more tragic fragments, some of which can break the heart.

This is a dark, somber, rare and precious jewel, which didn't age at all since 80s.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ramses on 24 July 2007
Format: Paperback
Wen I was young (20 years ago), my two favourite books were this one and Ludlum's Parsifal Mosaic. Hundreds of thrillers later, they remain in the top five. The 4th protocol contains lots of clever twists, it is much better than the (not bad) movie they made with Pierce Brosnan and Michael Caine out of it. It is probably dated now, cold war is over, but it still remains a top book for me. I shall re-read it someday. If you have never read it you should, Forsyth could write good stories at that time (now he has lost his edge but who does not age ?).
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By Maciej TOP 500 REVIEWER on 28 Nov. 2013
Format: Hardcover
I am aware that there are many excellent spy books, but in my modest opinion this is the one that describes the best this strange and dangerous universe that is secret war.

Frederick Forsyth wrote a couple of even better books ("The day of the Jackal", "The dogs of war") but they were not exactly about spying. In this book, written in the 80s, he describes a very clever and dangerous plot of KGB, which, if successful, could really break NATO and leave Western Europe vulnerable to a possible Soviet takeover. The description of Soviet inner circles of power are very good, much better that in the usual spy stuff - Frederick Forsyth was one of the few Cold War spy writers who had a really good understanding of USSR and it shows here. The story is very coherent, the plot is plausible and technically possible and its execution is described in incredibly professional way.

There are however other stories circling around the main plot which describe some of the horribly dirty tricks used by the intelligence communities all around the world (the story takes us from United Kingdom to Soviet Union and then to Africa, before coming back to UK). There are no superheroes in this book (although there are superlosers) and this is definitely not a James Bond movie material - there is however a masterly executed description of the gray, shadowy, dirty and smelly world, where virtually nothing is what it appears and every double bottom has a third bottom... I will absolutely not reveal anything about the plot, but prepare to be surprised. Many times. There are humouristic moments in this book, although this is a dark humour - there is much more tragic fragments, some of which can break the heart.

This is a dark, somber, rare and precious jewel, which didn't age at all since 80s.
Read more ›
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By Mr. Ross Maynard VINE VOICE on 17 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback
Frederick Forsyth gives us a fast-paced thriller with a credible plot (for the 1980's). As usual he writes in a no-nonsense, matter-of-fact style, which doesn't offer any character development or emotional involvement, but the story is superior to many in this genre.

With the benefit of 25 years hindsight large elements of the plot are far-fetched (and reveal Mr Forsyth's right-wing tendencies). I don't believe for a moment that the British people would tolerate a Marxist government, but I do remember the fetid atmosphere of the mid 1980's, and it would have felt more credible then. I notice also that there are virtually no female characters in the book and a few vaguely sexist comments in there.

The story does run out of steam a bit in the final quarter - the plot is revealed: it's just a matter of chasing down the agents before they can unleash hell. For me this lacks tension, but the book is an enjoyable train/ airport read which passes the time well.
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